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Hi folks,
Does anyone have any tips for teaching a young horse to neck rein, once they have the direct reining down? It always seems to take a long time, but I can't think of a faster way of doing it (basically I apply neck rein before I direct rein until the horse gets it).

Thanks!
 

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What I did was still direct rein but also press my hand against the horse's neck while he turned. Then I switched to the reins instead and began to phase out the direct reining.
 

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This is how I was taught to teach my horse to neck rein- say we are going left...I lay the right rein on her neck, then open the left rein (direct rein) while I put a little outside pressure on her shoulder with my heel. As soon as she makes the move to go left, I release the pressure from my heel and drop the direct rein. 3 tries and she got it.
 

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Here is a good video of the basic way that I do it.

And here's another good one by another guy. (If you want to skip right to where he's showing how on a horse, go to about 2:20)
 

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Thanks!

Smrobs, how long does it take your horses, in general (assuming each horse would be a little different).
 

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I have never actually purposely trained a horse how to neck rein. Mine just end up magically doing it on their own. If you follow the correct steps, they will learn on their own.

I teach mine to move off leg, turn on the haunches, move their shoulders, etc and the neck reining just follows. It's actually quite simple if you understand the fundamentals.
 

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I have never actually purposely trained a horse how to neck rein. Mine just end up magically doing it on their own. If you follow the correct steps, they will learn on their own.

I teach mine to move off leg, turn on the haunches, move their shoulders, etc and the neck reining just follows. It's actually quite simple if you understand the fundamentals.

^^This.

I don't like to use the term "neck reining". I much prefer to use "leg steering". The horse has to accept leg contact and be taught to move away from pressure of the leg/seat cue.

There should be 3 areas on each side of the horse that will initiate a reaction. One spot at (or very close to) the girth to get the horse to move his shoulders. One spot where the rider's leg hangs naturally straight down to move the horse's rib cage/middle section. One spot slightly farther back that will move the horse's hind quarters.
 

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Thanks!

Smrobs, how long does it take your horses, in general (assuming each horse would be a little different).
On a pretty normal horse, they would be fairly consistent in the basics after just a couple of sessions of working on it but it generally takes a few weeks and sometimes a few months for them to be really consistent about doing it right. If I've got some job that I'm doing with them, like working cattle, they seem to pick it up a lot faster. I spent a fair amount of time working in a feedlot on a pony that I broke last year and he was neck reining (and leg yielding/side passing) like an old, broke horse by the time he had about 12 rides on him.
 
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