The Horse Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 3 yr old that will be showing next year and would like to get a nice show saddle but I don't know what is best for him. He is 16.1 not very wide and the vet said he has a lot of growing to do because of his blood lines. Would a close contact be better since he is still growing or wait to let him finish growing before I buy an expensive saddle???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Wait till he is done growing before you look into spending a lot of money. He will go through many body changes and if you go and buy a saddle you may end up selling it down the road for less as it may not fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
My Thoroughbred uses a FQHB barrel racing saddle. With his height, & more growing to do, I'd say he will need a full quarter horse bar saddle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
"A nice saddle" will depend on what kind of showing you want to do. Do you want to do reining? Western pleasure? Barrel racing? They all require a slightly different kind of saddle and have different fashions/what's "in".

I would wait 'til he's finished growing (5 is usually safe) before investing too much, and by then you'll have an idea about what's he's really good at, and what direction you want to take him in~
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
My opinion is to only buy custom-made saddles, and only ever have (except when I lived in Jordan), and in doing that you can get a huge amount of information from the saddler. The question is if you are willing to scrape and save the money for a good custom-built saddle. It might be tough doing it, but, as someone who has bought three custom built saddles (2 for me and 1 for my brother[I built another myself]) I can tell you that it is more than worth it if you find a good saddler. If they are well built (and looked after) they will outlast your grandchildren; and mine have never made a horse sore.
The problem is that what many people think about saddle fit is actually nonsense, and any advice you are likely to get from non-professionals should probably be taken with a large grain of salt. If you go to a good saddler and explain what you want he/she will be able to tell you what is possible, the range of different horse shapes and sizes that will fit into what range of different tree measurements (because it is a range, and type of horse) and so on. When I say go to a good saddler, I don’t mean go to a saddle shop and ask them, they will most likely just want you to buy a saddle from them, find an actual saddle maker.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top