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I guess, but I'm not liking that face very much...
 
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I think the face expression reflects the horse's thoughts, look at the bit on him and how snug the reins are. He is prepared for anything that might happen as it could result in a nasty jerk on his mouth
 

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1. The horse, according to authoritative writing was a Kentucky Saddler, alleged forum er to KMSHA鈥檚.

The Hatfields had the means to buy the best horses and most comfortable saddle horses in the late 1800鈥檚 and they allegedly owned over 7,000 acres (25 square miles) so buying stock with an easy gait makes sense.

2. Devil Anse is sitting on an ancient form of plantation saddle and the bit is what was used on 鈥漵mooth riding鈥 horses in those days鈥 the lady I bought Joker from had one of those old bits.

3. Devil Anse was documented to be 6鈥 tall when he died at age 82. Knowing we all shrink with age, he was not a small man in his youth. If he is sitting on his favorite horse Fred, Fred was a good sized horse.

4. The expression on the horse indicates he is ready for whatever might happen but that is a gorgeous big ole head that also looks to be the forerunner to the modern day Tennessee Walker 鈥 which was not established as a breed until sometime in the 1920鈥檚.

5. The documented information on the Hatfields and the McCoys is far more interesting than the movies and the documentaries that I have watched.


^^^This site is not secure so maybe not the wis3st thing to open if one doesn鈥檛 have some sort of strong antivirus.
 

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See to me, that horse is on alert and "listening" intently to his rider in voice and body posturing cues...

A bit aggressive/annoyed look, but....horses are not dumb and know what would be a normal day of work & feuding could mean and be...
The animal is also already feeling the bit and hands of his rider...
Bet a picture of him with ears forward would be startling in how really nice a animal he was...:unsure:
馃惔...
 

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Devil Anse is one unfriendly looking guy, would not want to pick a fight with him, even if he didn't have that big rifle in his hands.
Actually, looking at the picture again, I feel like he and the horse sort of have the same face. So, yeah. Maybe they've been partners for a while and the horse just picked up the nasty face from his rider! You know, how people and their dogs supposedly start to look similar...
 

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I see it and think he鈥檚 simply a nervous horse chewing on the bit. He鈥檚 probably a pretty ambitious sort. A picture is just a brief glimpse into time. You can make any horse look great or awful by specifying that moment.

I think he鈥檚 a big dude, or the guy is small. It seems like a lot of the pictures from the old days make the horses look big, but those antique trees are really small. I think people used to be a lot smaller. The old beds at the ranch seem child sized.
 

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I think he鈥檚 a big dude, or the guy is small. It seems like a lot of the pictures from the old days make the horses look big, but those antique trees are really small. I think people used to be a lot smaller. The old beds at the ranch seem child sized.
When Devil Anse passed at age 82, he was documented at 6鈥 tall. He was likely a bit taller in his younger days, so that horse is pretty big. Thoroughbreds had been introduced into Virginia in the 1600鈥檚 by England, so there鈥檚 a chance the horse also has some TB in it.

The horse is pretty, IMO. I鈥檝e seen that foto elsewhere 鈥 the horse appears to be solid black. His hooves look pretty good given it鈥檚 1888.

I tried to enlarge the pic to see more of the saddle and I couldn鈥檛. Even for 1888, the saddle looks almost like a home made plantation style saddle - it鈥檚 an ugly thing, lol

Did you notice the big wide stirrups? Looks like they鈥檝e been around a whole lot longer than the ones that have come on the market in recent years, lollol
 

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This is a picture of "Devil Anse" Hatfield but look at the chest on that horse!!!
View attachment 1131422
Based on size (not just height), time period, geographic location, popularity in the eastern US, and availability (being the most popular military mount with Southerners in general and with most General officers in both Union and Confederate armies...R. E. Lee's mount, Traveler, was one...look at one of his pictures) I'd say that it is a what became known as the Saddlebred (once it was given a name as a breed). Today the breed, like the TWH (the Saddlebred predates the TWH and was one of the breeds used in creating the Tennessee Walking Horse), is nothing more than a pale shadow of what they originally were. At the time all Saddlebreds were gaited (having been created by the original crossing of Narragansett pacer and later "saddler" mares (a gaited type of horse, not an actual breed as "breed" was not a big deal back then and what become the Saddlebred were often referred to as "saddlers" early on) and the gaited offspring of a TB crossed with saddler. The goal had been to create a gaited horse that was taller than a saddler and larger (in size, not height) that TB had started becoming. Hugely popular during the War of the Great Rebellion and would have been commonly known about and available to Anse Hatfield (Lee's Traveler came from that general part of the country).

Depending on when the photo was taken the TWH may not have existed yet (the late 1880's) or would have been in its infancy and more common in Tennessee. Not as likely to be found in WV much at that time.
 
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