The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
a normally sure-footed trail horse to start tripping pretty frequently?


I'm 90% sure it's something my farrier did, as it started after her last trim, but I just want to see if it could possibly be something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,166 Posts
If a horse suddenly starts to do something that he never did before, you need to look at what changed. If he just started to trip and it happened right after your farrier's visit, that is where I would start.

I would call the farrier and ask him to come out to recheck my horse. He could have a nail that went in wrong, he could have an abscess, or got a trim that was a little too heavy, etc.. That is where I would start looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
do the feet have long toes? did he change the angle of the feet drastictly? a huge change in angle of the feet can cause a horse to that
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Her toes aren't long, but her heels are short. My last farrier was trimming them way too short (especially in the back), and my current farrier is trying to fix it. It wasn't that bad in the front, though. I'll get the farrier back out. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
I agree with iride. She could be a bit sore if it was a recent trim on soft feet, or it could have been that something didn't go 100% right, how long ago was the trim? If you're working on changing her angle, that might cause it for a few days or so, until she gets used to the small changes. Abscesses can also cause this without obvious lameness, if it is just brewing and not ready to break out yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Her last trim was two weeks ago and she's been tripping ever since. He trimmed her six weeks before that and she was fine after it. He was doing the same things with her angles then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,061 Posts
As others have said the farrier has to be the first port of call.

But: try videoing on level ground the horse's leg and foot action trotting and walking directly towards you.

Some modern vets do keep a high speed video camera for doing gait analysis but probably they then charge a fortune for performing the analysis. However gait anlysis will show up an unbalanced foot action - which the farrier can then correct by counter balancing the shoe (like rebalancing car wheels with weights). However a good video will show you most of what you and probably the farrier need to know.

An 'English' rider would ask himself whether the horse had 'dropped onto the forehand'. Solutions for that condition are more complex.

but there is another simple reason - that the horse is tired or unfit.

B G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Does your horse land heel first? or is he stubbing his toes then snapping down the heel? Heel first is the correct way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Does your horse land heel first? or is he stubbing his toes then snapping down the heel? Heel first is the correct way.

I would assume she's coming down toe first, but she hasn't done it except when I'm riding her, so I haven't seen it happen from the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,166 Posts
I would assume she's coming down toe first, but she hasn't done it except when I'm riding her, so I haven't seen it happen from the ground.
If nothing else, such as tack, has changed, then I really would suspect something done by or irritated by the farrier. If your horse is fine without a rider, but tripping with you aboard, then I would think she is off balance.

Have your farrier back out and have him watch the horse with and without you riding. If she is in shoes, then I might ask to have them pulled to check underneath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
I would have how she lands studied before deciding any course of action. See if the landing is heel first when not mounted as well as what is happening when mounted. Video? may help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
If nothing else, such as tack, has changed, then I really would suspect something done by or irritated by the farrier. If your horse is fine without a rider, but tripping with you aboard, then I would think she is off balance. Have your farrier back out and have him watch the horse with and without you riding. If she is in shoes, then I might ask to have them pulled to check underneath.
Nothing has changed. She might do it when she's not being ridden... I haven't really paid attention to that.


I would have how she lands studied before deciding any course of action. See if the landing is heel first when not mounted as well as what is happening when mounted. Video? may help.
I can take a video. Should it be from the front or the side or both?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
When my horse was very trippy it was because his toe was too long. But thats just my personal expreince

definitely check feet and for any kind of stiffness that might be a subtle lameness
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
When my horse was very trippy it was because his toe was too long. But thats just my personal expreince

definitely check feet and for any kind of stiffness that might be a subtle lameness
Her toe was too long, but my farrier has been evening it up over the past two trims. It just doesn't make sense that she would suddenly start tripping while her toe is being shortened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Honestly I'd like to see pics of the trimmed hoof. Low heels are not the culprit tho long toes certainly are. Toes need to be backed up, tho not necessarily shortened. Backed up from the front/top, not from flat bottom. Make sense?

I'd say a video from the side would help you study the landing best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Oh, and she tripped today when I was walking her back to the barn after riding. It was the first time I saw her do it without a rider, but that doesn't mean it hasn't happened. I hadn't been looking for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Have you tried a flat shoe and set the shoe back in the toe as far you can? That is what i normally recomend to start with and then go to rolled or square toe if needed.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top