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Discussion Starter #1
We might be breeding my mare in the future who has had many foals with her previous owners. She is a registered sorrel quarter horse with great bloodlines and she is beautiful! She is turning 15 next year and due to previous injuries she can only be lightly ridden at a walk and trot. We had her checked out for the vet and she actually recommended to use her as a broodmare. So the question is: Is there any possible way to get a buckskin foal out of a sorrel mare? If not, what about a palomino? Thanks :D
 

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To produce your best chance of buckskin, she should be bred to a perlino. Breeding to a perlino guarantees a buckskin, palomino or smoky black foal, with buckskin being the highest percentage of the option. Breeding to a double cream (perlino, cremello or smoky cream) guarantees a dilute foal. Depending on whether she or the stud throw agouti, it can be a toss up between a palomino and a buckskin (smoky black is a lot less likely, just as buckskin would have better chances if the mare also carries agouti).

You could also have a chance at a buckskin by breeding her TO a buckskin, but this is a lot less of a guarantee - then you have the option of buckskin, palomino, smoky black, bay, chestnut or black.

Obviously though, color should be the last thing you're breeding for. Perlino is a somewhat "rare" color, you definately don't see it as commonly as the others, and I think it would be a crying shame to sacrifice conformation just to get a colored foal.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks so much for the information. of course I would never breed for color, I was just curious to see what color stud was needed. Thanks! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What does "BREEDING FEE: P/T L.C.F.G" mean?
 

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>>>What does "BREEDING FEE: P/T L.C.F.G" mean?

Private Treaty- Live color foal guarantee

It means they guarantee that the foal will be born a specific color/color(s)---most likely offer a refund or a breed back if you don't get whatever color(s) they guarantee-- but since he is double dilute they can be pretty confident what colors he will sire.

Private Treaty means that they negotiate each breeding fee individually with the mare owner, usually pricing the breeding according to how much they like the mare, and/or how likely a foal from the mare will make their stallion look good-- for example if the mare is a champion or champion producer, if the mare owners have a history of showing and promoting the foals they raise, etc.
 

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The other perlino stallion that I like a lot is RFF Starbuck located at Red Fox Farm in TX ... he has thrown some really nice foals in the past

If you do breed your mare to a cremello, then you will 100% get a palomino foal - there is no other colour option possibility ... :)

Does anyone know of any nice smoky cream stallions out there that can also be recommended?
 

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>>>> I just found him

I would like to see a conformation photo of this stallion, and more about his foals. I looked at the website for him --
Our Stallion

and I am confused about what they are stating he "is" genetically-- they state he is homozygous for AA, EE, cream and DD-- yet they also say he has sired palomino, dunalino, and grulla foals (and some of the foal photos they are calling dun look like regular buckskin to me)-- if he has sired palomino and dunalino foals he cannot be homozygous EE, if he has sired grulla foals he cannot be homozygous AA, and if he has sired palominos and buckskins who do not have dun factor he cannot be homozygous DD.

Their website also mentions alot of foals sold without papers-- not sure why that would be something you would mention on your website like it was a GOOD thing?

I dunno-- this one just has my radar up. He might be a nice horse and his owners are just getting into the swing of things, and/or were given bad/inaccurate information, etc-- but IMO be sure to see him and his offspring in person or thru good photos and videos, and also request a breeding contract and go over it very carefully-- if at all possible find mare owners who have bred their mares to him and see what their experience has been.(All of the above is a good idea no matter what stallion you are breeding to IMO.)
 

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Green as in cash. If you want a Buckskin best way to get it is buy one.
 

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>>>> I just found him

I would like to see a conformation photo of this stallion, and more about his foals. I looked at the website for him --
Our Stallion

and I am confused about what they are stating he "is" genetically-- they state he is homozygous for AA, EE, cream and DD-- yet they also say he has sired palomino, dunalino, and grulla foals (and some of the foal photos they are calling dun look like regular buckskin to me)-- if he has sired palomino and dunalino foals he cannot be homozygous EE, if he has sired grulla foals he cannot be homozygous AA, and if he has sired palominos and buckskins who do not have dun factor he cannot be homozygous DD.

Their website also mentions alot of foals sold without papers-- not sure why that would be something you would mention on your website like it was a GOOD thing?

I dunno-- this one just has my radar up. He might be a nice horse and his owners are just getting into the swing of things, and/or were given bad/inaccurate information, etc-- but IMO be sure to see him and his offspring in person or thru good photos and videos, and also request a breeding contract and go over it very carefully-- if at all possible find mare owners who have bred their mares to him and see what their experience has been.(All of the above is a good idea no matter what stallion you are breeding to IMO.)
I agree. Can we say color breeder who knows nothing about color or breeding or even horses from the looks of it.
 

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To get a buckskin from a sorrel, I won't even pretend to know the answer to that. But, to get a palomino from a sorrel, breed to a cremello, and the only color you could get would be a palomino.
 

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Please excuse my ignorance. I have always read (in english horse books) that a dun is a light brown/cream coat with dark points. Later on in life I came across the term Buckskin which sounded like another term for dun. I thought that buckskin is the American term and dun is the English term for the same colouring. Could someone clarify the colour differences for me please.
 

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Please excuse my ignorance. I have always read (in english horse books) that a dun is a light brown/cream coat with dark points. Later on in life I came across the term Buckskin which sounded like another term for dun. I thought that buckskin is the American term and dun is the English term for the same colouring. Could someone clarify the colour differences for me please.

Taken from the International Buckskin Horse Association:

"A true colored buckskin should be the color of tanned deerhide with black points. Shades may vary from yellow to dark gold. Points (mane, tail, legs) can be dark brown or black. Buckskin is clean of any smuttiness. Guard hairs which are buckskin colored grow through the body coat up over the base of the mane and tail."

"Dun is an intense color with a hide that has an abundance of pigment in the hairs. The dun color is a duller shade than buckskin and may have a smutty appearance. Most dun horses have dark points of brown or black. Dun horses sport the "dun factor" points which include dorsal and shoulder stripes, leg barring, etc."

Definitely two different colors. A dun can have sootiness, whereas a buckskin is a clear coat. My guy in the avatar is a dun, even thought at first glance he looks like a buckskin. He has shading on his shoulder, forehead and has leg barring - a buckskin shouldn't have that.

Some say that a dorsal stripe = a dun. No stripe = buckskin. However, some buckskins can have a dun stripe, it will just be very clearly defined with no sootiness on the outside if clipped.
 

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Dun and buckskin are genetically different. Dun is a seperate gene then "cream" which causes your palominos (chestnut with cream), buckskins (bay with cream), smoky blacks (black with cream) and double dilutes such as cremello (chestnut), perlino (bay) and smoky cream (black).

Dun is a gene that can affect ANY color - in fact, genetically, you can have a buckskin dun (a lot of people call them "dunskins"). Dun is a "primitive" gene that will always cause zebrea striping on the legs and a dorsel stripe. It really has very little to do with actual color, because dun and cream can both affect ANY color. The tell is in the markings, and from past lineage.

 

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As a note, sooty can affect ANY horse. So while your standards bay duns (the ones that look like buckskins) are usually softer and somewhat sooty in appearance, sooty can affect buckskin just as easily and make them look "dun". Your best tell is in the zebra striping and checking past lineage.
 

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