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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys think of this? To me personally it looks like abuse, but I thought I'd just ask
 

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So I didn't watch all of it. But I got right down ****ed off at 5:45 where she says "He's a very nasty horse"

Umm.. Some guy he doesn't know is continuously yanking on his head and pulling it down. You would be ****ed off too. I'm assuming he's doing this to show the horse, "hey this is what's going to happen if you pull back" and I'm also guessing he's pushing on his body to see what the horses reaction is. And it's in the snow, on a slight slope. Dangerous much?

I'm just really unhappy. Could they not put off the farrier for another month and trained this guy a bit. If a horse doesn't understand, what do you expect. Poor horse.
 

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Well, since we didn't see any dangerous behavior to start, I don't know why they began with aggressive methods. It might be that they have seen what the horse does first but the guy holding him in the beginning made it sound like he picks up the front but simply didn't try the back.

The way this video is shot it is as though they are trying to fight with the horse. I tend to not like fighting. I will if needed but they are setting this horse up to be defensive. Why wouldn't the horse try to kick the guy, he started with aggressive behavior toward the horse the second he met him and kept the pressure on.

I think there are a lot better ways to get that job done. The way they did it, risked the health of the horse and someone getting kicked but good. Also, by rough handling him, they are not teaching him to trust and be comfortable with handling, they are teaching him people are aggressive. That could end poorly.

There are way too many videos on youtube of people using flooding techniques, I think people think it is the only way to get the job done. I find that very sad. I think this horse would have responded better to some steady, calm, fair ground work. Who wouldn't?
 

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I watched all of it. It was very crude, once he started he didn't stop at all. Maybe I'm bleeding heart, but I would have given the horse a break once he held his leg up. Given a good pat and told him he was good. That is a lot for a horse in one session.

I'm REALLY hoping that horse was a rescue and that's why he's never had his feet picked up. There is no excuse for not basic training. Even a pasture puff, basic manners and training need to be done.

I agree with Inga. We don't know. But that guy was really rough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I kind of lost it when he tied the horse up and started using the plastic bag on it... It's like he's saying "I don't care if you're scared, I'm the boss and you're not gonna get away. You're gonna take this!"
 

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I agree with Inga. We don't know. But that guy was really rough.
But the horses feet didn't look like he was in immediate need of critical attention. Someone must have trimmed the horse. The only acting out I saw from the horse was when he was being treated aggressively. I suspect they could have gone about this in a much better way without incident. There are many people that jump into the most aggressive/assertive manner of training right away or at the first sign of hesitation on the horses part. Man handling is not my favorite way of getting a job done. Also, the horse is 10... I wonder why they need to suddenly toss shoes on him. I didn't see a mean horse in this video. I saw a horse that didn't know what was expected of him. I always find that sad so... add me to the bleeding heart club. :cry:
 

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This is about as far as I got into the video.

Camera Lady: "Have you ever seen him pull back?"

Owner: "I've never seen him pull back."

Other guy: "I've designed this for horses who pull back."

?????
No kidding. I too thought ??? The horse seemed to be a relatively willing horse based on what was shown. The fact that the horse tried to nail the jerk that was man handling him at that point doesn't show me he is mean. I just find these types of "handlers" to be a bit sickening really. I felt bad for the horse for the most part and when a human is looking at something like that and wondering... "what is he asking the horse to do?" Then how in the world is the horse supposed to know? The owner shouldn't have let anyone like that come and treat their horse in such a manner. He obviously wasn't concerned with doing a good job of shoeing either based on what I saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think the biggest question in this is, how did any of what he did before he touched his feet even have anything to do with teaching it to accept being shod?
 

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I didn't watch much of it because of what happens have been made, but it is obvious the horse is unsettled from the get go of the video.

Typical "manly man" approach of "You are GOING to listen to me, regardless of how you react." It's obvious being aggressive doesn't fix this problem and his approach only exacerbates the problem.
 
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That was supposed to say "What comments have already been made."

TV + typing = fail.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That was supposed to say "What comments have already been made."

TV + typing = fail.
Lol xD
I also noticed that on that particular video comments are not allowed on youtube
 

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If you look on youtube, this lady and this hispanic man have several videos on using this halter to teach a horse…______ (fill in the blank) I only watched a couple, and am not a fan. Some allow comments, some do not. Definitely NOT something I would ever use. It teaches the horse nothing, IMO. I watched the trailer loading one-the poor mare was trying with her owner, and probably would have been fine given time. It is also amazing the guy doesn't get himself killed. I am surprised the horse doesn't jump right on top of him. Here is the link. SHe has 14 videos. UGH.

 

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If you look on youtube, this lady and this hispanic man have several videos on using this halter to teach a horse…______ (fill in the blank) I only watched a couple, and am not a fan. Some allow comments, some do not. Definitely NOT something I would ever use. It teaches the horse nothing, IMO. I watched the trailer loading one-the poor mare was trying with her owner, and probably would have been fine given time. It is also amazing the guy doesn't get himself killed. I am surprised the horse doesn't jump right on top of him.

This is my problem with any of these "gimmicks" that people try to sell as the be all and end all of horse fixes. They do not teach the horse anything and do not allow the horse to bond with and learn to trust it's person. I have had horses that I believe I could do most anything with. I didn't force things, I gave them time to understand what I was asking. Once you have that bond, the horse will do anything for you. Trying to force a large animal to do something generally has the opposite effect.

I wouldn't wish anyone to get killed but... I wish I could have been the horse in the first video with that guy. I wouldn't have missed when I tried to kick at him. Just enough to give him something to think about. Oh, I hope that didn't sound evil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This is my problem with any of these "gimmicks" that people try to sell as the be all and end all of horse fixes. They do not teach the horse anything and do not allow the horse to bond with and learn to trust it's person. I have had horses that I believe I could do most anything with. I didn't force things, I gave them time to understand what I was asking. Once you have that bond, the horse will do anything for you. Trying to force a large animal to do something generally has the opposite effect.

I wouldn't wish anyone to get killed but... I wish I could have been the horse in the first video with that guy. I wouldn't have missed when I tried to kick at him. Just enough to give him something to think about. Oh, I hope that didn't sound evil.
I don't think it's evil at all, at least not your thoughts lol. First time I saw it I wished the horse had kicked him in the head
 

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Well, I might get some flak for this comment, but I totally understood what he was doing. When I was 12 I got my first horse and -unbeknownst to me- she was a monster when it came to having her feet touched. Her hooves were absolutely awful when we got her so one of the first things we did was have a farrier come out. She beat him up pretty good, but I learned a lot that day. Being a farrier is a dangerous job because it doesn't matter what a horse's manners are like: the hooves still have to be taken care of. Watching the video I saw a highly reactive and un-trained horse acting very similar to mine. Some of you said that the horse was reacting to someone new asking it strange things, but I don't think that's an excuse. The horse obviously had been allowed to get away with behaving in this way. While I wouldn't have gone about it the same way this farrier had, I also understand that for whatever reason these people have not put time into this horse yet, but still expected him to be shod. The farrier has to do what should have been done slowly over the course of several weeks -or months- in a single day. So, yeah, it's not pretty and gentle, but it gets the job done without hurting the horse.

In response to the OP, who was asking how what he was doing applied to shoeing: maybe I can help explain. When he was pushing against the horse he was measuring how it reacted to pressure. In order to shoe it, he would have to be in close vicinity of the animal's hooves, and he needed to know how it would respond. The bag flapping was a safe way to desensitize it to the contact and noise/movement while staying out of range of the hooves. As the person in the video said: "He will kick you." It was the same with him patting the horse all over and jumping up and down around it. The horse needed to be less reactive before he could safely even think about picking up the hooves and shoeing them. He ran the stick down the legs to get the horse used to something touching them, and so that later he could pick the leg up get the hoof without the horse freaking out. Even though I wouldn't use his methods, I can still respect them. He shoes the horse and in the end the animal walked off calmly with neither of them being hurt.

All I can add is that I really hope those people work with that horse a whole lot so that the next trip will be less eventful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well, I might get some flak for this comment, but I totally understood what he was doing. When I was 12 I got my first horse and -unbeknownst to me- she was a monster when it came to having her feet touched. Her hooves were absolutely awful when we got her so one of the first things we did was have a farrier come out. She beat him up pretty good, but I learned a lot that day. Being a farrier is a dangerous job because it doesn't matter what a horse's manners are like: the hooves still have to be taken care of. Watching the video I saw a highly reactive and un-trained horse acting very similar to mine. Some of you said that the horse was reacting to someone new asking it strange things, but I don't think that's an excuse. The horse obviously had been allowed to get away with behaving in this way. While I wouldn't have gone about it the same way this farrier had, I also understand that for whatever reason these people have not put time into this horse yet, but still expected him to be shod. The farrier has to do what should have been done slowly over the course of several weeks -or months- in a single day. So, yeah, it's not pretty and gentle, but it gets the job done without hurting the horse.

In response to the OP, who was asking how what he was doing applied to shoeing: maybe I can help explain. When he was pushing against the horse he was measuring how it reacted to pressure. In order to shoe it, he would have to be in close vicinity of the animal's hooves, and he needed to know how it would respond. The bag flapping was a safe way to desensitize it to the contact and noise/movement while staying out of range of the hooves. As the person in the video said: "He will kick you." It was the same with him patting the horse all over and jumping up and down around it. The horse needed to be less reactive before he could safely even think about picking up the hooves and shoeing them. He ran the stick down the legs to get the horse used to something touching them, and so that later he could pick the leg up get the hoof without the horse freaking out. Even though I wouldn't use his methods, I can still respect them. He shoes the horse and in the end the animal walked off calmly with neither of them being hurt.

All I can add is that I really hope those people work with that horse a whole lot so that the next trip will be less eventful.
I have done everything he did in the video but in a way different method. Never once have I had a horse even think about kicking me for it. And to put it into perspective, I'd kick someone too if they tied me to a post and poured a bucket of spiders on me.
 
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