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Discussion Starter #1
I went to see this little 5 year old mare the other day, and she is such a sweetie!
Full of personality, seems well trained to lead, ride and offer her feet, and is quite the puppy dog mare. She was busy nudging my coat pockets and giving me kisses. Just the kind of horse I'm looking for.

I was told she is paint and saddlebred. (her father was a paint and mother was a paint/saddlebred X. )

I'm thinking of getting her, but there is one thing I'm a little concerned about. When she was being born, her mother had to be put down because her uterus tore and she was bleeding to death.

Could this be something that is hereditary? I'm wondering if in a couple years I decide I'd like to breed her, is it possible that she might have the same problem?
 

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She's a cute little mare. You'll have to check with your vet about the uterus thing, though I know that personally, I would not breed her.

Get a vet check if you buy her - I really don't like those front pasterns one bit. That lead to soundness problems, and I wouldn't want to pass that to a foal. Get a vet to look at her for sure.

She is cute though! Hope it works out!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, I'm glad you mentioned the front pasterns! Being a newbie I didn't notice that. (blushing and hanging head)
 

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It happens to the best of us - we meet a horse we love and look past what could be fatal flaws.

Bottom line, you just want to make sure that she will be sound and healthy for using. If the pasterns will be a problem, I'd pass on her. But if the vet tells you she's fine for riding, then go for it, but I wouldn't breed her either way. Just don't want to risk passing that on to a foal.
 

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I don't like that the front pasterns seem so long, and the back relatively shorter. Not to mention her back leg is pretty straight (not a good thing--no bend in the gaskins/hocks).

But if you're going to just trail ride her... she shouldn't be too bad at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, and being a novice, it will take time for me to learn how to spot flaws quickly.
I would like to find a mare that I could breed later on for a foal or two should I decide to do so.

That is why I'm glad I have a great place to post and ask for advice. I really appreciate all your knowledge and comments. So I hope you all don't mind me posting pics of various horses I find, for your feedback.


It happens to the best of us - we meet a horse we love and look past what could be fatal flaws.

Bottom line, you just want to make sure that she will be sound and healthy for using. If the pasterns will be a problem, I'd pass on her. But if the vet tells you she's fine for riding, then go for it, but I wouldn't breed her either way. Just don't want to risk passing that on to a foal.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, I see what you are talking about. As sweet as she is, I think I am going to have to pass. She'd be ok for a nice companion and a little riding, but I don't want to take the chance that I might have problems later on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, I see what you are talking about. As sweet as she is, I think I am going to have to pass. She'd be ok for a nice companion and a little riding, but I don't want to take the chance that I might have problems later on, since she would be my main horse for now.
 

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If you are looking for a mare to breed, I would suggest some kind of purebred registered mare that would be worthy of breeding. I like that mare, she is cute and her front pasterns would likely be fine for moderate riding but she is not something that I would want a foal out of. If you wanted, you could post pictures of your possible buys here and people can give you an honest opinion of what flaws they may have and whether we believe that they would be worth breeding. As you have probably noticed, some of us can be rather blunt but it is said with the best of intentions for both you and the horse. :D
 

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I'd also advise that you separate your riding ambitions from your breeding ambitions.

As a novice, finding somthing that's safe and appropriate for you to ride, AND a good broodmare prospect AND affordable will likely be very difficult.

I'd recommend finding a sweet, useful, novice friendly pleasure horse now, and when you get to the point you want to venture into breeding, look for a good broodmare prospect. Finding both in the same package will be difficult.
 

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Smrobs is for sure right about getting a registered mare for breeding. I do not know what your plans for the foal are, but a registered foal will ALWAYS trump a grade foal in a sale. There are just too many grade horses, and irresponsible breeding is what gives us those flaws like long pasterns, etc.

Maura also brings up an interesting point. A horse that will be safe/beginner friendly AND suitable for breeding's going to come with a price tag.

If you're not even sure about your breeding plan, I'd say hold on, and maybe search for a mare or gelding that will teach you, and suit your immediate needs. Should you decide to breed later on, look for a good broodmare when you know a little more about breeding and conformation.

And Smrobs is right, fee free to post other possible buys. :]
 

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Discussion Starter #12
LOL! Yes I noticed the bluntness, but it tells me you are passionate about your horses and only want the best for them, so I know I will get good, honest advice. I'm all for that. :)



If you are looking for a mare to breed, I would suggest some kind of purebred registered mare that would be worthy of breeding. I like that mare, she is cute and her front pasterns would likely be fine for moderate riding but she is not something that I would want a foal out of. If you wanted, you could post pictures of your possible buys here and people can give you an honest opinion of what flaws they may have and whether we believe that they would be worth breeding. As you have probably noticed, some of us can be rather blunt but it is said with the best of intentions for both you and the horse. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes, I think you are absolutely right! I am running away with my dreams here. First and foremost I want a sweet, loving companion/riding partner to bond with.

smrobs, your comment is true as well. I don't need to try to pack everything into my first horse. If I feel I want to venture into breeding later, I can cross that bridge with a proper mare.


I'd also advise that you separate your riding ambitions from your breeding ambitions. .....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes you are all so right!
So, gelding or teaching mare it is. :)


Smrobs is for sure right about getting a registered mare for breeding. I do not know what your plans for the foal are, but a registered foal will ALWAYS trump a grade foal in a sale. There are just too many grade horses, and irresponsible breeding is what gives us those flaws like long pasterns, etc.

Maura also brings up an interesting point. A horse that will be safe/beginner friendly AND suitable for breeding's going to come with a price tag.

If you're not even sure about your breeding plan, I'd say hold on, and maybe search for a mare or gelding that will teach you, and suit your immediate needs. Should you decide to breed later on, look for a good broodmare when you know a little more about breeding and conformation.

And Smrobs is right, fee free to post other possible buys. :]
 

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This might be the first critique thread that every piece of advice has been listened to - and appreciated.

Can I get a "Hallelujah!"?
 
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