The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next summer I will be starting the major groundwork training and in the winter I will be breaking her.

I'm a 4-h member and Twista is my training project. If you aren't familiar with a 4-h Training Project Program, we have to train the horse on our own. We can get help/guidance but we are the only ones who can train.

She has some basics down- leading, tying, picking up feet, standing for the farrier, brushing, lunging at walk/trot, and some desensitizing. But as I live in Minnesota, we get quite a bit of snow and we don't have an indoor arena so I'm kind of letting her have the winter off. We will still do basics every now and then.

One of the things we have to do is ground driving, I usually start ground driving horses in a halter then in a bit. But in 4-h when we show our training projects we have to have a bit in.

* I have broke another horse, actually this one's sister, so I do have experience with working with young horses and people are guiding me *

I have a Single Jointed Plain D-Ring, Single Jointed Roller D-Ring, and a Single Jointed Plain O-Ring. But I am looking for suggestions... I have heard that sidepulls work well.

Opinions/Suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,303 Posts
We have always used single jointed d-ring eggbutts.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Snaffle bit is a good go-to for most any discipline. O or D ring, either one works and a good horseman can ride in just about any headgear. Personally I prefer to invest in one single good bit by a real bit-maker such as Jeremiah Watt than have a wall full of mass-produced stuff because you'll get a lot better result with good gear. Real bit-makers understand the horse's mouth and their products are more expensive but well-worth it in the long run.

The only major weakness to a standard snaffle is the way that it breaks in the center will poke the roof of their mouths, but a dog-bone style mouthpiece will help alleviate that particular problem.

It sounds like you've already done quite a bit of good work with her and the same kinds of things I do with every horse now. It's hard to do too much of regular day-to-day handling, brushing, saddling, leading around and teaching to stand tied patiently. As she becomes familiar with a greater variety of situations and simply gets in the habit of going to work on a regular basis she'll become more and more settled. It's very easy to overdue things like lunging and round pen work, work at liberty, basically anything that requires significant mental and physical energy and focus from the horse so I apply a 90/10 principle to it. This includes groundwork and arena work. If you do 90% regular handling and bonding and 10% 'training' your horse is much more likely to become settled, confident, relaxed, reliable, and serious about her work than to overdue the training and fry her brain. Expect a young horse to have a lot of energy. Count on it in fact, and have a plan to get her enough exercise (but no repetitive lunging) so that her mind gets to working for you. Go for walks, take her places, and transition into riding her as she's ready for it and YOU'RE ready for it.

How old is the mare? What's her breed, her energy level, disposition, other characteristics?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank You!

We moved her to a bigger pasture so I'm not able to do a lot 'training' time anymore until we bring her back next spring.

She is almost 14 months, I would like to hold off on breaking her until she is 3 but with 4-h and my main show horse getting older I have to start her earlier. Twista is a 1/2 Thoroughbred X Quarter/Arab. I had the choice to choose between her, and 2 other foals and I chose her because she looks exactely like her mom. She has a really good work ethic, super curious about everything, willing to learn, extremely friendly. I also had a friend who shows higher level AQHA watch her movement and he said she amazing movement and loves how relaxed and easy going she is when she works. He said he would have offered me $1500 for her but she isn't a QH. My goal is just to do basics in the beginning and future I would like her to be my all-around horse. When I mean all-around I truely mean it, Halter, Western Pleasure, English Pleasure, Trail, Gaming, Cow Horse, and possibly Jumper if I have the time. My main show horse is a 15 year old Thoroughbred that I did most of the training on my own on, she barely knew the basics and does everything above (except jumping) and places high in everything.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top