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My horse has only ever gotten hay and whatever she can graze on in the field- usually nice green grass in the spring until they trample it. She doesn't have a hard time keeping weight on, in fact she has a hard time getting it off after a long winter. I know that there is a celenium (sp) deficiancy in the area because a lot of the calves are born with white muscle, so I was wondering what you all feed your horses and why, and if you think it would be good to put willow on a special type of feed or something.
 

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Rena gets myrestol (for her joints) because her cannon bones arent lined up or something, so we give her that to just make it easier on her legs. and then she gets mash,and oats,and hay. :p
 

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Hay, hay, hay. That's all our mares eat. Natural, good for the gut, and for the teeth.
 

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12 pounds of hay
1 cup flax seed
cocosoya
1 pound beet pulp
cosequin
Grandvite

And she is on pasture (but everything is dead right now)
 

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Oops! I posted without finishing!

I feed flax seed because (I just copied this off a website lol I am so lazy) it is high in omega-3 fatty acids and enhances overall health in horses. The only natural, unsupplemented source of omega-3's in the equine diet is fresh grass.
It can help reduce inflammation, which can relieve symptoms associated with sweet itch and other skin conditions. It can also alleviate symptoms of allergies.
Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it also helps in cases of arthritis or joint stiffness. In some cases, it helps so much that it can replace the use of commercial joint supplements or regular doses of bute.
It also boosts the immune system and can help regulate thyroid function, making it an ideal supplement for metabolic horses as well as aging horses.

I feed the cocosoya for weight as well as the beet pulp.

I feed the cosequin for her joints and the Grandvite for all the vitamins and she is missing from her diet that she isn't getting from grain.
 

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I have a mix of ponies, a paint and a draft cross so I feed grass hay (Bermuda and orchard) to keep everyone healthy. We're also in CA where the alfalfa is very high in calcium so I avoid it. My guys also get Purina Strategy for horses on grass hay and also a big scoop of flax meal. Keeps them looking nice and shiny, healthy hooves. That's it! Right now we have grass so they're enjoying that but 80% of the year, they're on dirt.....
 

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they all get alfalfa and
my weanling gets LMF development
my mare gets LMF senior with Equiberries Choice
my stallion gets Omolene #100 with Equiberries Choice a
my race horse gets Omolene #100 with Equiberries,but he is going to be switched to Purina Race Ready with Equiberries.

I have had good luck with Purina Enrich with vitamins as well.

Also rice bran for weight and BOSS for coat/weight.

buuuuuuttt.....some horses to perfectly fine on just hay:wink:
 

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Rosie gets a gallon and a half of Purina Molene 200 in the morning and the evening, along with 3 flakes of orchard grass hay in the morning and evening. Before we found out she's in foal, it was one gallon in the morning and evening and 2 flakes in the morning and evening.
 

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Alfalfa and only alfalfa. In the summer, sometimes we will get alfalfa/grass combo but that is getting hard to find. They are fed range cubes as treats occassionally.
 

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4 set feedings of hay, 1 flake each
1-2 flakes spread throughout the day between feedings (in handfuls and quarter flakes)
3 buckets of water in his stall, kept filled. One is heated.
Vitamins:
1/2 scoop of Safe Choice feed
1 cup of NW supplements
1/2 oz of Easy Boy (for the magnesium)
1 oz of Bio-mos
4 oz of Neighlox, 2 oz fed in the morning and at night
1/2 cup of corn oil
for 7 days each month, one scoop of psyllium

1 Himalayan salt block
various tidbit treats at times, such as carrots, apples, beet treats, lmf, alfalfa pellets, and imported bananes treats. I put these in a ball occasionally and he rolls it around for a while getting them out.
grass when I can graze him

I have a bunch of stuff on here so I don't want to explain them all out if necessary, but if you want to ask me about something you are more than welcome to. My horse is post-ulcer, so his feeding is a little more complex than what I would normally feed.
 

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Both on Coastal grass hay to their hearts content.

Aidan, 2 qts Banks Mill Endurance 12% 2 x day, 2 scoops super 14, 1 scoop corta flex (going to be switching to smartflex I next month) for joint support

Sonata, just 1 qt 2 x day Banks Mill Advance
 

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You can feed hay pellets with a vitamin that has Selenium in it. That would be a simple way to cover your bases, without having to feed much. You could just give 1/2 scoop of alfalfa or other hay pellets, then mix in your vitamins. That's what I do and it works very well. I can feed my "fat" horses less pellets and my harder working horses more, while they all get the same vitamins.

Look for a supplement that has 1-2 mg of Selenium per-serving. Nutri-Plus++ is one that is 100% complete for all vitamins and minerals recommended, including high level of amino acids. You can feed just the smaller 1oz serving to most horses. Equine Products Inc - Top quality equine supplements Use thier ingredient list to compare with other vitamins and even feeds that you're interested in using.
 

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4 set feedings of hay, 1 flake each
1-2 flakes spread throughout the day between feedings (in handfuls and quarter flakes)
3 buckets of water in his stall, kept filled. One is heated.
Vitamins:
1/2 scoop of Safe Choice feed
1 cup of NW supplements
1/2 oz of Easy Boy (for the magnesium)
1 oz of Bio-mos
4 oz of Neighlox, 2 oz fed in the morning and at night
1/2 cup of corn oil
for 7 days each month, one scoop of psyllium

1 Himalayan salt block
various tidbit treats at times, such as carrots, apples, beet treats, lmf, alfalfa pellets, and imported bananes treats. I put these in a ball occasionally and he rolls it around for a while getting them out.
grass when I can graze him

I have a bunch of stuff on here so I don't want to explain them all out if necessary, but if you want to ask me about something you are more than welcome to. My horse is post-ulcer, so his feeding is a little more complex than what I would normally feed.
Corn Oil has shown to incerase inflamation. If you switch to flax, rice bran, fish oil, or some other oil/fat supplement without any corn oil in it, you may see better healing in his ulcers.
 

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My adult horses are on the reccommended amounts of Blue Seal Carb Guard for their weight/activity level. My yearling is on Blue Seal Contender, according to her needs.

My hardkeeper TB gets soaked alfalfa cubes with her pm feed.

All have 20-25 pounds (which is pretty much 24/7 for them) of timothy/orchard grass hay a day.
 

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NELSON GETS:

  1. Hay 24/7. He is infront of a round bale all day during turn out, and hay in his stall all night.
  2. 5 pounds of Purina Senior X 2. He gets fed A.M and P.M, 5lbs each = 10lbs a day
  3. 1/4 cup of CoCo Soya per feeding
  4. SmartGut from SmartPak for his tummy and digestion and ulcers
  5. Corta-Flx and Absorbine Flex +
  6. Mineral/Vitamin lick in his stall, plus what is in his Purina Senior Feed
  7. Glucosamine IM once a month
 

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Hay, hay, hay. That's all our mares eat. Natural, good for the gut, and for the teeth.
amen. so do i, lol. My gelding was on grain for a few weeks to gain weight because when we got him he was underweight, but nothing else.
 

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Three leaves of hay in the a.m.
Some alfalfa in the a.m.
One leaf of hay for lunch.
Three leaves of hay in the p.m.
1.5 lbs. packer pellets (not grain)
1 cup of Mazola corn oil
2 scoops of MSM

During summer when there is mostly turn out, the hay is cut back.
 

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Corn Oil has shown to incerase inflamation. If you switch to flax, rice bran, fish oil, or some other oil/fat supplement without any corn oil in it, you may see better healing in his ulcers.
His ulcers are actually gone, and his vet said corn oil was the best choice for him after considering various oils. He is quite healthy at the moment.
 
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