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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ride at an Arab stables, and most of their horses are 'pure' Arabians. What are the different variations of Arabians? Like the shape of body, face, etc. not coat...
Do you think if it's not show worthy, or not a pedigreed Arabian it would sell for less? ;-)
 

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If a horse is registered it can add value, but it just depends. For instance, just because a horse is registered doesn't mean it's a good horse. It could be registered but could just be used for trail riding or something. :)

Also, here's what arabianhorses.org says about their appearance:

Characteristics

Although no individual animal will possess all of the qualities described below, the composite, nevertheless, epitomizes the finest specimens observed:

  • His skeleton is characterized by a relative shortness of skull, a slenderness of the lower jaw, a larger size of brain case. Also to be noted are fewer vertebrae in the back and tail, and more horizontal pelvic bone position.
  • The Arabian's head is a real thing of beauty, the upper half being larger in proportion to the whole size of the horse, especially in the depth across the jowls.
  • The head has a triangular shape which diminishes rapidly to a small and fine muzzle, which is so small that it can be enclosed in the palm of the hand. The lips are fine and thin. The nostrils are long, thin, delicately curled, running upward, and projecting outward. In action or when the horse is excited, the nostrils may become greatly dilated.
  • The eyes are set far apart and are large, lustrous, and , when aroused, extremely attentive. They are set more nearly in the middle of the head.
  • It is interesting to note that the distance from the top of the head to the top of the eyes is often within one inch of the distance from the lower eyelid to the top of the nostril. The overall appearance of the Arabian head is frequently enhanced by a slight protrusion over the forehead and extending to just below the eyes, called the "Jibbah" by the Arabs, and greatly prized.
  • The cheek bones spread wide apart at the throat, often between five or six inches, enabling the muzzle to be drawn in without compressing the windpipe, and permitting the animal to breathe easily when running.
  • The ears, smaller in stallions and of good size in mares, are pointed, set evenly together in an upright position, and of great flexibility.
  • Generally speaking, the head should be lean, somewhat well chiseled, and showing energy, intelligence, courage, and nobility. The neck is long and arched, set on high, and run well back into the withers.
  • In height, the Arabian horse generally measures 14.1 to 15.1 hands at the withers, although there are horses which measure above or below this height.
  • The animal's coat is thick, close, fine, soft, and silky. The mane and tail are long, and very fine in texture.
  • In weight, the Arab may be from 800 to 1,100 pounds, according to his size, but there are individuals who exceed this weight occasionally.
  • In color, Arabians are bay, gray, chestnut and black, with an occasional roan. Common markings are stars, strips or blaze faces, as are also snip noses, a white foot or more, or white stockings.
  • Arabians that appear white are actually gray, since white looking Arabians have black skin. White hair on horses grows out of pink skin as can be found under an Arabian's white markings. Click here to learn about Color & Markings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Most look like this right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Her head looks more like this
(Not my pictures, all credit to owners)
 

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I have always liked this breakdown of commonly used stallions in the Russian arabian breeding programs and what they brought to the table.

I don't have time to post pix right now. I have five Arabians ranging from pure polish- to crabbet/polish - polish/Russian to straight Russian.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

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Arabians are a very diverse breed! There are several different bloodlines, including Egyptian, Polish, Russian, French, Crabbet (English), etc.

I adore the breed but I'm no Arabian bloodline expert; Just a casual admirer. :lol:

From what I've gathered, Egyptian Arabians are often your halter type- quite fine boned with a more drastically dished face. The other bloodlines are typically thicker boned and what you might see in performance a bit more.

My mare is a purebred Arabian from mostly Polish and French lines (some French Arabians sort of resemble Thoroughbreds in my opinion!). She has Arabian characteristics, but she doesn't have the drastically dished face and she has pretty decent bone.

Just to show you the diversity in the breed, I'll post a photo of her.



She's been mistaken for a cross bred more than once!

Do you think if it's not show worthy, or not a pedigreed Arabian it would sell for less? ;-)
I would assume registered horses often sell for a little more, but really I've seen Arabians for sale at all prices. Registered or not.
 
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Photoshop helps, too, lol!

minuitmouse, that chestnut is just beautiful! She may not have an extreme head, but she has a lovely eye. Can you post her full name?

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Photoshop helps, too, lol!

minuitmouse, that chestnut is just beautiful! She may not have an extreme head, but she has a lovely eye. Can you post her full name?

Nancy
Wait.. What? I..don't..have a horse :-| oh! That's not mine hehe :oops: photobucket lol
 
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My arab doesn't have a real dished face either but everything else is arab about him. i bought him as a colt and seen both his parents but he still gets mistaken as a cross breed just because of his face.
 

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she has a pretty face. i think the new look and super dished face and large upright nostrils make them look rather deformed. and before the arab people get upset, I also do not the look of the quarters with the jacked up butt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think I like the dramatically dished face either lol
 

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The dish isn't as common as you'd think. There are a lot of Arabians at my barn and none have the dramatically dishy face (and yes some are very well bred). I am definitely an Arab person but the extreme dish is just unattractive. They are already beautiful enough without breeding for the dishy face.

My two guys...neither of them have the big dish.
 

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There are a number of different variations of Arabians. All are registered as Arabians, but within that breed there are several different types and within those types there are even more strains. All of these have different characteristics.

There are Egyptian Arabians, Polish Arabians, Spanish Arabians, Crabbet Arabians, etc.

You've asked a very loaded question, but if you're looking for a brief overview then:

  • Egyptian Arabians tend to have a lot of type and refinement. They are very dainty and are prized for their small ears and tea cup muzzles. They tend to be a little on the shorter side, rarely going over 15 hands, though there certainly are exceptions. Ansata Arabians bred a very particular type of Arabian, which has a very classic look and each generation is stamped with this look; though, in the show ring these days the winners have strayed from this classic look onto a more modern look. Look up images of Ansata Arabians and you will notice this look.
  • Within the Egyptian Arabian breeding there are several strains including Saqlawi, Kuhaylan, etc. Each subsequent strain has different characteristics. For example, the two that I have listed are very different. Saqlawis tend to have the refined looked, whereas the Kuhaylans are more masculine and muscular in appearance.
  • Polish Arabians have a little more substance, though they are still bred to be refined and beautiful. Breeders in Poland take bone size into consideration more so than breeders of other strains. Polish Arabians tend to make excellent performance horses.
  • Within the Polish Arabian type there are several lines, similar to the Ansata line of the Egyptian Arabians, such as the famous "E" line, which includes horses such as the famous Eukaliptus, Emandoria, etc. Like the Ansata breeding, the "E" line of Poland has a very particular type that, due to it's genetic strength, is continually and consistently passed on to resulting foals.
  • Crabbet and Spanish Arabians are similar in that they are very well proportioned, more like what other breeds are bred to look like. They aren't so focused on extending the neck, or long legs. They tend to be more square in appearance; though, still very beautiful.


*Please note that the above are very brief descriptions designed to demonstrate the variety of appearances within the different lines.


Today's modern Arabians have a mixture of several of these lines. It seems as though there are spectacular examples of every breed, but that the horses dominating in the show ring are the result of strategic breeding of the best qualities of each line. Thus, there are multiple different types that can be found within the breed. The Arabian Horse Association has a sort of "guideline" that I believe was posted earlier by someone else. This is what the current standard is, but there is no such thing as the perfect horse, and as such, there is certainly a multitude of differences.


Besides all of these different types, Arabian Sport Horses are also becoming a trend. Breeders are specifically taking the most athletic horses and breeding them for more performance based careers, rather than halter. However, conformation and type remain a key factor in these breeding programs and becomes a challenging balancing act. Some of these Arabian Sport Horses have come so far as to appear as smaller, typier Warmbloods.


I hope this helped a little. I know I talked a lot, but it is a definite point of interest for me. I tried to keep it all brief to allow you to search and discover some aspects for yourself, as I am by no means an expert. I am simply an Arabian enthusiast and owner for many many years.
 
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