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That's kind of a broad question, honestly. Why are you asking?
 

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That's like saying what foods are bad for humans.

Just like with humans, some foods are only good as occasional treats, some are useful in small amounts but can be overdone, some are basic and standard. Some horses can't eat some things other horses can.

And some things are toxic in any quantity.

You are asking for an equine nutrition textbook -- you'll need to be far more specific.
 

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Red meat. Cholesterol. Plus makes it more likely that they will try to eat humans.
 

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Chicken strips are just fine though.
Pork. The other white meat.

In all honesty there are a lot of stuff horses should not eat. But if you are just wanting to know about proper nutrition for one then a lot of variables factor in. Are they on a grass pasture? What do you use them for? What's their current condition including age, weight? Some horses gain weight by looking at grain while others need a little something extra.
 

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Weirdly enough, my DH used to have a jumping pony when he was young that loved chicken on bread rolls. Never seemed to hurt him as he lived into his 30s!
That is weird. :chicken2: Wonder how that would break down in digestion. I think wondering is all I'll do. :razz:
@Avna nailed it. We'd need to know more. There are horse-safe feeds out there that aren't good in "over this amount per the weight of your horse" quantities, and there are undesirable pasture plants out there that won't cause problems if the horse eats a small amount before you find it (IE: clover - https://www.manitobacooperator.ca/livestock/clovers-can-affect-horse-health/ .) I mean, I could say generally...green grass pasture and grass hay is the staple of the equine diet, and it's easy to start there. But even green grass pasture and grass hay might be high in iron or nitrates (not desirable.) So, as everyone's pointed out, you're looking at a broad topic. Here are some more specific questions you might consider asking: "What are some toxic pasture plants common for my area, and what affect do they have on the horse?" - "Which whole-nutrition supplements have proven consistently badly proportioned for horses?" - "Is it possible to feed too much alfalfa?" - "How do I know if my grass hay is good for my horse? Has anyone ever encountered toxic plants in their grass hay?"
 

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I have a horse that has stolen chicken strips, pepperoni pizza and any bag of chips anyone sets down. He's still alive, but I too also wonder how it breaks down in digestion. I have horses who love Cheerios and another who loves orange Skittles. Oreos, bananas, watermelon and peppermint candies get handed out on rare occassion as a treat in strict moderation. Too much would probably be a bad thing, and they would gladly scarf it all up.
 

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Red meat. Cholesterol. Plus makes it more likely that they will try to eat humans.
Haha! Why is there no 'laugh' button??

My donkey used to love beef jerky - do you think that's why he used to charge at my boyfriends??
 

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Re meat & other non-herbivore foods, I too don't know how their body handles it, can't imagine it's great for them, but remember reading about foods 'traditionally' fed to horses in different places in the world & spiced meat was apparently common in India or some such.

As for feeds bad for horses, whole 'it depends' still applies, a commonly fed & commonly bad for the horse ingredient is most cereal grain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Re meat & other non-herbivore foods, I too don't know how their body handles it, can't imagine it's great for them, but remember reading about foods 'traditionally' fed to horses in different places in the world & spiced meat was apparently common in India or some such.

As for feeds bad for horses, whole 'it depends' still applies, a commonly fed & commonly bad for the horse ingredient is most cereal grain.
Thanks for your info!
 

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^I bet! What a terrible waste of good chocolate!!!

As for the horses perspectperspective, unless the person was feeding it a heap, or the horse is insulin resistant & chocolate is particuparticularly sweet, can't imagine it would be a problem.
 

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I had a pony who loved PBJ sandwiches, Oreos and beer.

If it's a show horse entering a show where a drug test is likely, you do not want to feed chocolate.

If you want a list of plants toxic to horses just Google Plants Toxic to Horses. It helps to have the knowledge to identify the plants.

The best rule to follow is If In Doubt, Don't Feed.

(Ahem...my horse would have to want chicken strips awfully bad to get them away from me.)
 

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I shared my Chips Ahoy and later, Pecan Sandies with Trigger this weekend. But he also got carrots, apples, and peppermint horse treats. They all did - but I only share my personal snacks with Mr. Trigger as a Big Reward when we get back from a ride or are taking a break on the trail.


He liked the sandies far better than the Chips Ahoy.


I might mention - MOST mass produced (Nestle, Hershey) chocolate in the US does not have much actual cocoa in it. That's why Europe has far superior chocolate. Because...it's actually chocolate, not cheap substitutes being called chocolate. Milk chocolate in the US, made by Nestle or Hershey, does not have a high toxicity when it comes to canines. I personally wouldn't chance it, but likewise, I wouldn't panic if my dog ate part of a Nestle Crunch or my horse snarfed down a Mr. Goodbar.


Mmmm - peanuts.



BTW - White chocolate (At least in the US), isn't chocolate at all. There's not one crumb of chocolate in it. It is 100% safe for dogs.
 

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My old gelding would steal hot dogs from kids at shows and fairs. He LOVED them. Especially with mustard. I had to keep a few bucks in my pocket all the time to give to people who got too close and got their hot dog swiped... he also loved grape soda, beer, and lemondrop candies.

In Europe, it is very common to feed leftover bread to horses. Even some top dressage/jumper barns do it. But that's also good, crusty, European-style bread without a dozen unpronounceable ingredients in it!

My mom remembers her grandpa wintering horses over on not just hay and oats, but pumpkins, turnips, and peas--- the peas were cut and dried while still on the plant, and were fed like hay-- so the horses and cattle got stalks, leaves, and peas. Her dad's task as a boy was to take an axe and cut pumpkins and turnips into chunks to shovel into the feed bunks every evening with the grain, and to fork down a couple of servings of dried peas with the morning's ration in addition to hay at each feeding. Apparently the cutting of the pumpkins and turnips was a lot of fun until they froze solid, then it was work...

My gelding adores those chewy sugared orange gummy slices. He knows if I have one in my pocket and comes running.
 

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I shared my Chips Ahoy and later, Pecan Sandies with Trigger this weekend. But he also got carrots, apples, and peppermint horse treats. They all did - but I only share my personal snacks with Mr. Trigger as a Big Reward when we get back from a ride or are taking a break on the trail.


He liked the sandies far better than the Chips Ahoy.


I might mention - MOST mass produced (Nestle, Hershey) chocolate in the US does not have much actual cocoa in it. That's why Europe has far superior chocolate. Because...it's actually chocolate, not cheap substitutes being called chocolate. Milk chocolate in the US, made by Nestle or Hershey, does not have a high toxicity when it comes to canines. I personally wouldn't chance it, but likewise, I wouldn't panic if my dog ate part of a Nestle Crunch or my horse snarfed down a Mr. Goodbar.


Mmmm - peanuts.



BTW - White chocolate (At least in the US), isn't chocolate at all. There's not one crumb of chocolate in it. It is 100% safe for dogs.
White chocolate has cocoa butter in it. But that's all.

One time a corgi of mine got on the table and licked out a jar of Dove chocolate spread as far as her tongue would reach. I got all panic stricken but the vet told me she could have eaten the whole jar and it wouldn't have enough cocoa in it to affect her.
 
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