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My old GMC has a modifIed 1973 454 in it. DH’s 1988 F-350 dually has a modified 1988 460 in it.

With either truck, it doesn’t matter if they’re empty or loaded to the max and pulling my stock trailer with three horses or pulling the car carrier with the old Caprice on it ——- the 454 gets 8.5-9 MPG and the 460 gets 9-10 MPG.

I never even dropped MPG’s when I would haul up to camp in the Allegheny Mountains years ago. I can’t speak to the new trucks but the older motors/drive trains were consistent, empty or loaded.

Those MPG’s are what I averaged moving from PA to SoCal in 1998 and what both trucks averaged coming back from SoCal to TN in 2003.

With my old truck, if I started getting less than 8 MPG, the plugs needed changed.

The phrase is we have to “sneak up on them with the keys just to get them started” but it’s worth every penny because they do their jobs and do them without blowing up.

It’s possible you are unconsciously driving the truck a lot different with horses in the trailer than when it’s empty, costing you gas mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
It’s possible you are unconsciously driving the truck a lot different with horses in the trailer than when it’s empty, costing you gas mileage.
LOL, not likely. Because I am CONSCIOUSLY driving the truck differently with the horses in it. I forced myself to change my usual mindset, which is "mileage mileage mileage" to "I don't care what mileage I get, I'm going to drive as softly as humanly possible for my horses." So that may very well be accounting for some of it.
 
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My old GMC has a modifIed 1973 454 in it. DH’s 1988 F-350 dually has a modified 1988 460 in it.

With either truck, it doesn’t matter if they’re empty or loaded to the max and pulling my stock trailer with three horses or pulling the car carrier with the old Caprice on it ——- the 454 gets 8.5-9 MPG and the 460 gets 9-10 MPG.
Long long ago, in a Kingdom not too far away, I owned and abused an '86 Ford F250 flatbed (I prefer a flatbed on a work truck) with the 460cuid engine, and a four-speed stick. Three-speed, actually, 'cause 1st was a granny gear, and not particularly useful in everyday driving. Stock it had this huge carburetor on it, and consistently got around 8MPG :p (Gas was ~$0.50/gallon back then IIRC.) It also had dual gas tanks, with a total capacity of 40 gallons, allowing it to drive on past a gas station once in awhile.
A Motocross buddy talked me into installing an early aftermarket Electronic Fuel Injection on it, which brought the fuel economy up to around 11MPG, and made the old pig considerably more driveable.
That truck had the same properties you describe, Walk; it made 11MPG empty, with a light load on the bed, or heading up into the mountains maxed out with two snowmobiles on the flatbed, and 5 or 6 more on a heavy flatbed trailer. I used it for heavy hauling until it finally rusted out from under me in the early 2000s. As final nostalgic tidbit, I seem to recall spending about $9K for the truck brand spanking new, and the dealership tossed in a set of heavy-duty rear leaf springs.
 

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I think the modern F250's are specifically for use (my son had a 2018 or 2019 - I can't remember which) gas F250. it was a really nice truck and he used it to do what it was meant to do and that is pull heavy loads. Most people that buy large heavy trucks like that are not as concerned with gas milage - they are concerned with torque and hauling ability. @ACinATX I don't think you are ever going to be happy with the milage you get from your new truck. It was not built or designed to be a gas conserving machine. Optimistically where you are hauling now I think 11-13 mpg is about what you will get. I confirmed with my son that he never got much better than that hauling his tractors and pulling truck. To be honest when I haul (and I haul horses weekly 1-3 x per week, and a mowing trailer with 2 commercial mowers on it 3-4 X per week) I don't look much at my mileage. On a great day with my F250 diesel (2012) I can get 15mpg. Most days are not great days
 

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@ACinATX , Now you know why people charge so much to haul someone else's horses. My 2005 Dodge diesel 2500 gets 20-21 empty but. is down around 12-14 mpg. The 2001 5.9 dodge 2500 gas truck gets 14 mpg empty and 10 mpg pulling a trailer. The freedom and convenience off having my own setup and not having to depend on someone else is worth it. My old cowboy buddy Bull had a saying covering this and a whole multitude of horse related item. " Ben, you know why horse poop is green? It's because they eat $20 bills" . No truer words were ever spoken!
 

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" Ben, you know why horse poop is green? It's because they eat $20 bills" . No truer words were ever spoken!
Feed prices are up. $100 bills these days, and they prefer the old soft ones, 'cause they don't have to chew around that security strip :-D
This why I get a bit touchy about someone saying "Free Horse".
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
@ACinATX , Now you know why people charge so much to haul someone else's horses.
Yes, I do, now, LOL! But yes, having the freedom to do what I want with them is amazing. I am not a person who likes to have to depend on others. And hopefully once I drive them around more I'll start relaxing a bit.

@carshon yes, it's true, my truck is a truck that's built to haul things, and I love it for that. I'm super glad I was able to keep the Civic as my normal car, though -- it gets around 40mpg if I drive carefully.

I guess part of me just started to worry about that trip through the mountains -- gas tank holds I think 30 gallons, I expect mileage in the mountains to be below 10mpg. I imagine myself stopping every couple of hours to get gas. Bleah.
 
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My truck is a '93 C3500. I really love my truck, but the last time I checked mpg I was getting maybe 8 when hauling 2 horses! I quit tracking my mileage- I'm gonna go where I want to regardless of what it cost me in gas.
Granted, I think the truck could use a tune up, that might help me out a bit.
 

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The accurate consensus is a truck that is built to work and work hard without blowing up will never get good gas mileage.

Gas or diesel, they sit home until they’re needed and we know it’s going to cost extra to go somewhere.

I used to keep $100 squirreled away in my truck, in case I needed it for a horse emergency or I had to load them up and evacuate. That money stayed hidden in my truck from the 80’s up until a few years ago:alien:
 

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I used to keep $100 squirreled away in my truck, in case I needed it for a horse emergency or I had to load them up and evacuate. That money stayed hidden in my truck from the 80’s up until a few years ago:alien:
I do/did that too walkin.
Actually every vehicle had $40 hidden in it for the uh-oh moment you leave the house only to realize the money is in your other pants pocket..
Now that "plastic" is easier to use than cash, well,... the money is still hidden in the truck but the cars, not anymore...
I spent it!! :p
🐴...
 

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I do/did that too walkin.
Actually every vehicle had $40 hidden in it for the uh-oh moment you leave the house only to realize the money is in your other pants pocket..
Now that "plastic" is easier to use than cash, well,... the money is still hidden in the truck but the cars, not anymore...
I spent it!! :p
🐴...
it’s still good to have some cash money in “the well out back”, in case we need fuel for vehicles, generators, etc and there is a gigundus power failure, since cards won’t work in machines if there isn’t any power:alien:

These days, we also try to keep several gas and diesel cans full just in case — not that I don’t trust our power grid but I don’t, lollol
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
These days, we also try to keep several gas and diesel cans full just in case — not that I don’t trust our power grid but I don’t, lollol
How long can you keep gas in a can before it goes bad, and what do you do with it if it does go bad?
 
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How long can you keep gas in a can before it goes bad, and what do you do with it if it does go bad?
It should never go bad as long as there was no moisture in the gas at the pump or in the cans to begin with. I have kept gas for six mo ths when I was single and realized mehbee I ought to use it. That was when I lived in SoCal and only had weeds to mow for two months out of the year, lol

In TN, we empty gas cans fast because there’s so much mowing and we run the 4-wheelers every day. Keeping gas in can over the winter won’t hurt anything, as long as it’s safely stored.

BTW, I think it was already mentioned to carry a spare five gallons when you move, just in case.

My old GMC only has one 18 gallon tank. I would have run out coming across New Mexico both times, had I not had a spare can. Who would imagine down there in oil country that gas stations would’ve been so sparse on the interstate that I couldn’t make it from one station to the next in one region:sick::sick:
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
BTW, I think it was already mentioned to carry a spare five gallons when you move, just in case.
Yes, I will absolutely do that. I don't know, maybe even two. I think the only thing worse than running out of gas in the middle of nowhere would be running out of gas in the middle of nowhere towing live animals.
 

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Gas does go bad. Especially gas with ethanol in it. You should drive your vehicle at least once per month or put a fuel additive in it if you are not planning to drive it for long stretches (lets say winter and you are not hauling your horses anywhere) We have a mowing business and use about 20 gallons of gas per week in our mowers and trimmers. We MUST run the fuel out of the tanks or drain them when we store for winter or the fuel degrades and causes running issues in the spring. A truck tank is much larger and may take longer to degrade but it will happen. Especially if you live in a wet climate - the gas tank will attract moisture.
 

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I generally keep 5 gallons of gas in the garage as well.
Gasoline stored in a sealed container will last at least a year with no noticeable degradation. A full container that is; a pint of gas languishing at the bottom of a 5 gallon can won't fare as well.
But these things do happen, and if you have some stale gas to dispose of, just dump it in on top of a mostly full tank in a vehicle.
Water in gasoline is not your friend, and other debris will enter as well. I have a funnel/filter that will separate out any water and grit, and if I have a can of questionable gas, I put it thru this before adding it to a gas tank. You can probably find one at a NAPA store, but here is one on Amazon:
Just in case the need ever arises, if you go to a local non-commercial airport, you can get the "100LL" aviation gas (100 octane low-lead), generally from a 24hour credit-card pump. This is good stuff; clean, no alcohol, and it contains a proven fuel stabilizer. This stuff will last practically forever if stored properly. It's a bit expensive, but if you are stockpiling fuel as a hedge against apocalypse or whatever, it's worth the trouble to get it.
We used to fill a couple of 55 gallon drums at the start of the season, and run it in our racing snowmobiles. We'd use up whatever was left over in our dirt bikes the following springtime. My little 4-stroke XR Honda ran so well on the 100 octane fuel that I would make the drive out to the airfield for 5 gallons of it rather than filling up at the gas station.
And I just know someone is gonna chime in with: "Oh, you can't put 100 octane gas in a regular car; you'll blow up the engine . . ." Politely put: "That turns out not to be the case." Higher octane fuel actually burns cooler, and thus resists detonation. You can get away with more timing advance, higher compression, and leaner jetting running high octane fuel. Or rather, I should say: "If you want to run jetting close to stoichiometric, higher cylinder compression, and high RPM/advanced timing, you will also need to use high octane fuel." However it will work just fine in your econobox, or even in your lawnmower. But it's kind of like feeding your dog Tenderloin.
Now you know The Rest of the Story ;-)
 

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Very true George...we use to run racing fuel sometimes if we overbought and the car did not accept/need it...
The truck could always have a drink. :rolleyes:
Except for the price of extravagance, nearly $10 a gallon at the time, it seemed to clean out the gunk and the truck ran cooler, with more power and I think smoother for several months after.
Never did we do pure racing fuel, but on a 40 gallon tank more than 1/2 full we would add 5 gallons of 114 octane fuel.
The "no-alcohol" is what makes it run so well...

How long can you keep gas in a can before it goes bad, and what do you do with it if it does go bad?
AC we use "fuel stabilizer" in our gas and diesel cans following directions for how much to how many gallons.
It can be bought in most any store, the brand we buy is a reddish color.
We do keep on hand 15 gallons of diesel during hurricane season as we never know what could arrive and how much we need the tractor to dig us out from being buried alive in debris.
Gas we have 30 gallons in approved containers at the ready for generators along with always 10 more gallons for the lawn mowers and cars if needed.
Once we are well out of hurricane season we then use that gas kept in ready and no, the additive does not harm the engine.
Much depends on how you store your product how long it keeps "fresh" and yes, it can make a difference in brand of additive product used.

If your gas product should go bad, you take it to a repair shop or recycling center and dispose of it in their waste containers so you not poison your drinking water supply.
By us businesses will accept within reason what you bring and not charge you so you not pour it out on the ground {some places the water table is 3' below the surface} and that is our drinking water with so many on wells here.
Since businesses must now pay to have hauled away used products of oil, antifreeze and gas mixtures they are not as happy to accept but think the laws force a certain amount per person per day.
🐴...
 

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We have an 02 Ford one ton super duty. We didn't get it to polish on it, it's a work truck. He has a bunch of stuff in the back, fuel tanks, tools, sometimes tires, mostly whatever he's working on that day. It loves it's diesel. It's a 7.3. I think it's a 5 speed. Then we took an older stock trailer, and converted it into a portable shop. He's got a compressor, torches, more tools, everything he would need out where he farms at. Put the two of them together, and it's not impressive. Then add the price of diesel.
Would love to update it, but the price of the newer ones is beyond belief.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Drink coffee while you drive. You'll be GLAD to stop every few hours....
Ugh, I REALLY don't want to have to stop anywhere for that reason. Yuck. Maybe that will be a whole new thread -- given my proposed travel route, where would I find clean bathrooms?
 
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