The Horse Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,565 Posts
If it appeared suddenly it could be:

Allergic reaction to a tick bite.
Spider bite.
Any type of biting bug.
Warble, if the horse is in an area where there are cattle or sheep.

If the size stays the same or gets bigger, you might have the vet look at it. If it is a warble (grub) the vet can remove it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JCnGrace

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If it appeared suddenly it could be:

Allergic reaction to a tick bite.
Spider bite.
Any type of biting bug.
Warble, if the horse is in an area where there are cattle or sheep.

If the size stays the same or gets bigger, you might have the vet look at it. If it is a warble (grub) the vet can remove it.
Oh my gosh YES there are several cattle farms nearby! There is one directly across the road from the farm where our horses are boarded. I believe the vet is coming this week for another boarder’s horse so I will have him get a look at the lump and remove the warble(s). Sounds like it will be gross to watch. Yuck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,565 Posts
Oh my gosh YES there are several cattle farms nearby! There is one directly across the road from the farm where our horses are boarded. I believe the vet is coming this week for another boarder’s horse so I will have him get a look at the lump and remove the warble(s). Sounds like it will be gross to watch. Yuck!
Don’t panic yet but it’s great the vet is coming to the barn anyway. Make sure your horse gets an appointment ahead of time:)

Reaction to tick bites can get that big on some horses and they do get hard. They will generally seep, however.

I’ve also seen spider bites get that hard but not that big. Some types of spider bites will cause the skin to peel back in layers.

Both of these bites will itch, causing the horse to rub or bite the spot a lot.

I have only seen a few warbles. The horses did not seem bothered by them and left them alone, but they do need removed if that’s what you’re dealing with:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: sharon1927

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
Were it one of mine, I'd wonder if it's an abscess. Horses can pick up a splinter or a locust thorn, just the craziest things... and the skin heal up before you see the entry spot... then it abscesses. They're usually hot from fever in the area, and tender... usually need to be lanced and drained.


Also: Subbing to see what Vet says.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sharon1927

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had the barn owner look at my horse. I figured he's been in the horse business for 40+ years so he had probably seen something similar at some point. But nope...he was baffled. He said he has never seen anything like it. The vet is coming out on Thursday afternoon, so I will let you all know what he has to say.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,046 Posts
Modern workers would kill a warble before it reached the skin.

I have seen many warbles, mostly in cattle, but always on the upper some of the host.

When the lump gets as big as your looks, there will be a small partially formed scab in the centre of the lump signifying it is ready to burst out.

Now the gross part is, if you pick that scab off you will see two eyes looking at you. Squeeze and the grub will pop out. They can be quite big!

I remember a friend getting some cattle from Ireland, about three months after arriving they developed lumps along their backs. I knew what it was but owner said it was an allergic reaction to something they had eaten. Got them into the pen and crush and proved him wrong. Best part was the children watching were all saying how gross, but days later were wanting to get them out.

Dr Pimple Popper eat your heart out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
I've unfortunately dealt with warbles(we just cattle them cattle grubs round here) on Mocha over the past few years. My vet recommended Ivermectin at regular intervals to get rid of them. I also check for eggs when I go out to feed. Catching them before the eggs hatch is the best, they look kind of like bot eggs and tend to be on the lower leg, but every once in awhile I miss one and get a grub. At least in our case here they tend to like her under belly and throat latch area. Never had them get that as big as the bump the OP posted or in that location though and like @Foxhunter said they have a scab in the middle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Modern workers would kill a warble before it reached the skin.

I have seen many warbles, mostly in cattle, but always on the upper some of the host.

When the lump gets as big as your looks, there will be a small partially formed scab in the centre of the lump signifying it is ready to burst out.

Now the gross part is, if you pick that scab off you will see two eyes looking at you. Squeeze and the grub will pop out. They can be quite big!

I remember a friend getting some cattle from Ireland, about three months after arriving they developed lumps along their backs. I knew what it was but owner said it was an allergic reaction to something they had eaten. Got them into the pen and crush and proved him wrong. Best part was the children watching were all saying how gross, but days later were wanting to get them out.

Dr Pimple Popper eat your heart out!
I was actually going to ask about wormers. I worm my horses regularly. The most recent deworming was administered on January 2nd with moxidectin (Quest gel, to be specific). So you would think that a horse on a regular deworming program would not be susceptible to a warble, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I was actually going to ask about wormers. I worm my horses regularly. The most recent deworming was administered on January 2nd with moxidectin (Quest gel, to be specific). So you would think that a horse on a regular deworming program would not be susceptible to a warble, right?
I don't actually know, but to kill any meningeal worm that might make it into our llamas (the same as brainworm in moose, for any of you in the northern tier) we have to inject ivermectin or dectomax; oral administration isn't supposed to work. Of course oral ivermectin is supposed to kill neck threadworm larvae but has to be dosed at double the normal strength. All of which makes me wonder if oral ivermectin or related, at the regular equine dose, would work against these or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
It would depend on what stage the grub was in when the wormer was administered. If it were still just an egg then it wouldn't effect it because likely the chemicals will have cleared the system before it hatches and burrows under the skin. The creepy thing is that the larva migrate thru the muscle tissues to the spot that they will incubate and eventually emerge from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,319 Posts
When the lump gets as big as your looks, there will be a small partially formed scab in the centre of the lump signifying it is ready to burst out.

Now the gross part is, if you pick that scab off you will see two eyes looking at you. Squeeze and the grub will pop out. They can be quite big!

I remember a friend getting some cattle from Ireland, about three months after arriving they developed lumps along their backs. I knew what it was but owner said it was an allergic reaction to something they had eaten. Got them into the pen and crush and proved him wrong. Best part was the children watching were all saying how gross, but days later were wanting to get them out.

Dr Pimple Popper eat your heart out!
Mmmmmhhhh, @Foxhunter! I feel a sudden urge to eat a late supper. Maybe some invertebrates... :Angel:

The grossest thing I ever saw or smelt was a type of abscess in a rabbit that, when it was getting emptied, looked like toothpaste coming out of a tube - and easily half a tube's worth of the stuff - except it smelt of... imagine Roquefort crossed with a cadaver that's been in the sun for a week... :winetime:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,656 Posts
Warbles in addition to normally being on the topline, also have an airhole and that discharges a pinkish oozy yuck before they get scabby and ready to emerge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The vet was out this afternoon. He palpated the lump and said it is definitely not attached to anything internally (like a rib) so that's good. I haven't been able to sleep because I've been worrying that it is some kind of tumor or cancerous growth. I realize it's unlikely for something like that to suddenly appear overnight, but still...this horse means the world to me so I've been very anxious about this. The vet said he believes it is a hematoma most likely caused by my guy running around in the pasture and bumping into a fence post (or getting run into a fence post by his pasture mate). If that's really what happened, then I think it's strange that there are no marks or other indications of trauma on my horse. No scrapes, no hair rubbed off, nothing. I did ask the vet if maybe it's a warble, but he said no because warbles are usually along the topline and also would have a scab (like some posters mentioned here).

The vet told me to continue monitoring it. He said if it does not start to shrink in the new few days, then he will come back. But at this point he said to leave it alone. He said if I want to use something topically, I could apply DMSO to it. So that's where we're at right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,319 Posts
Warbles in addition to normally being on the topline, also have an airhole and that discharges a pinkish oozy yuck before they get scabby and ready to emerge.
OK, who has read Neil Gaiman's The Ocean At The End Of The Lane? It has this fantastic scene of a boy removing a worm from his foot...

The author reads it at the start of this interview. :Angel:

https://youtu.be/VBRLDi5wZ98?t=235
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,656 Posts
I thought of you this morning when across my page came an ad for the never ending garden book. How you can feed yourself for free, forever with never any input. Thread promised hearty breads, savory veggies and luscious fruit desserts. There were baskets of produce from all of these perennial plants to provide all of this..... of course all the baskets held fruit. No grains or veggies to be found. I would love to be fruitarian but my body may not cooperate.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top