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Some places i've checked i've got to ride a clydsdale, but do I. I weigh 300 and going down but is that too much for my horse ,She is 16 hands and1200 lbs and 10 years old
 

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The 20% rule is bogus! Don't follow that, it all depends on your judgment, how well you ride, and on your horse in particular. Is she fine boned or heavy boned? Does she have a well built topline, strong coupling? Is she conditioned and in shape? Do you feel like she has a problem holding you? Can you ride nice and balanced without flopping around? Do you ride lightly? Does your tack fit well? Have you considered a pad that will evenly place your weight on her back?
 

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Agree and agree. Get a vet or another equine professional to evaluate you and your horse under saddle, you may be absolutely fine.

Kudos to you for asking the question, and also for committing to your riding.
 

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Also maybe invest in a Skito pad or something of the like, they are designed for heavier riders to provide adequate spine relief...
 

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tHE 20% rule is used for static wieght like you would get with a pack saddle. I have put 150 pounds of salt on a good stout horse and seen them struggle with it because it doesn't move with the horse and throws them off balance a little easier.
 

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Yep it all depends on the rider. I was talking to my trainer about this because I am a bit of a bigger girl but at the barn I use to be at I was the most experienced rider and was being asked by the owner to try out smaller horses to evaluate them for potential homes. Long story short, she told me that she looks at it as how good of a rider are you, are you dead weight, or are you moving with the horse, that makes a big difference.

Things like special padding to help distribute your weight as well as properly fitting tack come into play as well along with what kind of build your horse has.

Good luck you on the weight loss, let us know how it goes!
 

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I have always heard people say, even some of the highend trainers around here, that they would rather put a 300lb rider that is balanced and has a light seat on their horse, then a 120lb rider who bounces all around, the lighter rider will do more damage.

I'm 270 and have ridden horses as little as 15.2 hands and 1100 pounds with no problems. I judge how I ride based on the horse. Say I was riding a 1100 tb, I wouldn't do any jumping, long trail riding etc. But when Im on my 1400lb gelding who ive been riding for 13 years, I know I can do anything I want with him. It really all depends on the horse. I rode a big, but lightly build warmblood once who had trouble with my weight, but on the opposite side I also rode a 14.3 hand spotted draft pony, who could haul me around on trail rides and everything with no problem what-so-ever.
 

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I was always taught/told, that a horse can handle 1/3 of their weight comfortably.
So a 1200lb horse in theory could handle around 270 lbs.

But again, I do agree that it should be based on condition/soundness of horse, plus the ability of the rider to "assist" the horse with proper balance etc
 

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I was always taught/told, that a horse can handle 1/3 of their weight comfortably.
So a 1200lb horse in theory could handle around 270 lbs.

But again, I do agree that it should be based on condition/soundness of horse, plus the ability of the rider to "assist" the horse with proper balance etc
I don't know about Canada but here in the States 1/3 of 1200 is 400. Minus 60 pounds for tack (that would be alot of tack) and your looking at 340#.
 

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Lol...yes Kevin you're right. I meant to put 370lbs not 270. I also had to convert from Kilograms, to pounds...so that is why I said around 370...but yes I missed that I put the 2 instead of the 3...my bad!
 

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And of course 340lbs seems like alot to me, but I think this theory is merely based on walking, and light riding not a 4 hour ride up steep terrain etc. So thoerys such as that must be taken with a grain of salt....

I have one roping saddle that weighs probably 50lbs! the thing is a beast!
 

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i've been told that 1/4 is comfortable and if you're approaching 1/3 its too heavy

i tend to judge by conformation and what not, but still not more than 1/4 of their weight for long rides, and not more than 1/3 for short rides.
 

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i've been told that 1/4 is comfortable and if you're approaching 1/3 its too heavy

I tend to judge by conformation and what not, but still not more than 1/4 of their weight for long rides, and not more than 1/3 for short rides.
Yes, I would tend to lean this way as well. Like I said I was always told 1/3, but again, never really based much value on it.

Imo it weighs (sorry for the pun) heavily on what type of rider you have, length of ride, type of ride/terrain, and the ability of the rider.
 

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Yes, I would tend to lean this way as well. Like I said I was always told 1/3, but again, never really based much value on it.

Imo it weighs (sorry for the pun) heavily on what type of rider you have, length of ride, type of ride/terrain, and the ability of the rider.
very true, even a light rider can do a lot damage if they can't use their own muscles in the saddle instead of relying on the horse
 

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A whole lot depends on the riders shape as well! A 300lb man who is 6'5" and in some degree of physical condition is much different from a 5'6" man who resembles "Boss Hog" - an apple on 2 sticks!


Biggest concern I have is people that have such tall horses that they cannot even mount them from the ground. When you are away from your mounting block, what do you do - Walk?
 

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ive always been told at barns around me, you cant be over 250.
which was always unfortunate for me because my boyfriend is 260 so he was never aloud to borrow a horse from a riding stable.
maybe their just trying to be on the safe side, who knows.
 

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Riding stables have to set a maximum weight allowance because the majority of their clients aren't riders. I don't see a problem with this at all.

Their horses are ridden by a lot of different people every week, so they need to have some standards to guarantee the longevity of their animals.

As far as riding your own horse the 20% rule is merely a guideline, it's not set in stone. As has already been stated the breed of horse, its conformation, state of health, and how well the person can ride are all part of the equation.
 
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