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I got this idea by reading another post and i thought this would be helpful to perspective new horse owners!


Let them Ripp!
 

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The list could be a long one, but one of the most common problems I read about is new owners trying to get and/or chase down registration papers after buying. Never turn over your $$s until you have verified the registration papers (e.g. correct horse and current owner), have the signed registration transfer papers, and a bill of sale (which is your proof of ownership) in your hand.
 

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Don't buy without a WRITTEN contract. Get EVERYthing in writing!

Don't be late. Early can be enlightening.

Don't lie about or imply inaccurate personal abilities on/around a horse.

Don't (try not to) be swayed by the "Horse will go to auction this weekend if you don't buy him NOW" or the famous "I have sixteen other people looking at him/her today" ploys. Generally, if someone DOES lay that on you, door is open for YOU to negotiate a lower price. Try not to be influenced by love at first sight, either.

Don't assume ANYthing.

Don't go alone, regardless of ability to recognize a quality horse. Four eyes will see one thing four different ways.

Don't see a potential candidate just once. If you like the horse, go see again, several times and in different conditions (rain/am/pm/ group/alone/ring/trail) if possible. We all have good days....and bad.

DON'T show up in a brand new Jag : )
 

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Don't get emotionally attached to the prospective horse. It'll cloud your judgment and you might end up buying a completely unsuitable horse or make it that much harder to walk away if the horse isn't right for you.

Don't buy any horse without a pre-purchase exam.

Don't buy a horse you've only looked at once.

Ironically, I've made the mistake of doing all three of those. :?
 

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If the owner is trying to push the horse on you (Ie. Horse is on a trailer tomorrow to be sold! You have to decide today!) don't get rushed by this! The owner is trying to cover up an issue and dump the horse on some sucker. I have seen this happen so so so many times. Whenever an owner says that to me I reply "great, good luck sale-ing the horse".
And always, always get a PPE, no matter how much you are paying for the horse, it is always worth it!! Someone once told me that you should pay 10% of the purchase price of the horse on the PPE. So if you're buying a $30,000 horse, budget $3,000 for the PPE.
 

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Don't get emotionally attached to the prospective horse. It'll cloud your judgment and you might end up buying a completely unsuitable horse or make it that much harder to walk away if the horse isn't right for you.

Don't buy any horse without a pre-purchase exam.

Don't buy a horse you've only looked at once.

Ironically, I've made the mistake of doing all three of those. :?
Yes do not get emotionally attached to the horse. Oh also be leary of sellers who won't consider a trial period, even if it's for three days if they are confident that the horse is well behaved and "BEGINNER SAFE" as they advertised ( you can tell I had this experience) then why worry as long as you assume the risk to purchase it if you injure the horse or something happens.
Don't buy after first look, visit horse and ride it atleast 4-5 times, in morning, in afternoon, in evening if lighting permits. walk horse around all three times on lead to see if they drag you around the property or are pushy, etc and groom each time and tack up to see if they are sensitive to things or crazy in crossties, etc. Also, riding in new place will tell you if they are a freak out of their comfort zone or if they have a reasonable mind and how big they spook if they do, things you need to know that you won't see at their comfort zone. but ride ride ride to see how adjustable they are and how respectful they are of their rider.
Again, I didn't have the option with my first horse and the no buck, no rear, no spook, no bolt beginner safe horse they advertised ended up doing all four things on me after the first week. Too late I already gave them my money and was stuck for 3 months with an impossible horse that was not a good match for me. He was a dream at his barn but once moved to a new location his real side came out..dominant, disrespectful, high strung and dangerous for a beginner. We joke that the drugs must have worn off but really should have pulled blood on him at PPE.
 
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