The Horse Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yikes, you wouldn't think a horse would tie up from being boisterous in a windy day??
A GF and I handwalked our horses that day - my guy was being especially fractious, plunging around. We did the usual things we do when we came in (stretching, beet pulp) and all was fine when we left.

The next day (Sunday) I thought I might do a trail ride seeing as how he was being sent back Tuesday. I arrived to find a horse that refused to walk out from his paddock. His back end was really stiff and sore, and I've never seen a horse with that issue before.

I called the trainer over and she suspected tying up. I called the vet and he came, did palpations, and gave the horse banamine and something else I can't pronounce. Stall rest, no concentrate, I have to give him 3 doses orally over the next 2 days of again something I can't pronounce (sorry!) and today (Monday) the vet returns to pull blood - I'll get the results on Tuesday to confirm his muscle enzymes.

Gah! I am glad this horse is going home! Unfortunately he will miss the scheduled trailering on Tuesday but I expect he's well enough to go for Thursday. I also wonder if he has undetected kidney issues. I've never seen a horse drink so much water. ...and pee so much.

Looking at causes of tying up I am seeing more about PSSM 1 and 2. Its kind of scary wondering how common this is in horses. There are many horror stories out there!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,907 Posts
Tying up can be nutritional(I believe it very commonly is) and is related to hind gut acidosis, from feeding grain, too much phosphorus & too little magnesium, among other imbalances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
https://thehorse.com/16700/tying-up-in-horses-causes-and-management/

The first and greatest of all my horses tied up one time. Tamar was a crossbred TB and half QH. She had the skeleton build and heart of the Thoroughbred with the mind and muscle of a Quarterhorse. She pulled like a freight train, loved to run and climp. She had powered up a steep hill and at the top stopped and would not go forward. Her muscles of her hindquarters were trembling violently. I was a 15 year old girl and did not know what to do. When she would take some steps I led her to water. I remember later she had dark colored urine. This was, I believe, exertional rhabdomyolosis.

There was a farm in the Coast Range hills that bred old time Morgans. The family patriarch told me they liked to gather cattle on these Morgans because they do not tie up on the hills like Quarter horses do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
He is walking normally today, sigh of relief. Just to be on the safe side I'm holding him til Thursday to transport him home.
Can you imagine the owner seeing a very stiff horse come off the trailer....nuh uh.

Apparently it costs around 1100 canadian $ for a tissue or hair sample to be done to test for PSSM. Yowza. I was just curious and asked my vet did he do much in the way of testing. Apparently the internist specialist does most of it, he passes them onto her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Are you able to send a hair sample to America to test? Animal Genetics tests for PSSM 1 for $40. Equiseq tests for PSSM 2 for around $249. Their test hasn't been peer-reviewed yet, but many owners seem to find it useful.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top