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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I am new to the forum and was hoping you could help me about PSSM. I have a 5yr old gelding who I just had tested and confirmed with PSSM 1.

I have been reading up and know to put him on a low starch diet. Our small town feed & supply carries Purina and LMF feeds. The LMF low starch feed looks a lot better than the Purina low starch because I am seeing it has lower starch. But while reading I am seeing a fat needs to be added for energy. Which is where I hope you guys could help me out. I am not sure exactly what to add to the feed, I have seen Rice Bran, Beet Pulp, Alfalfa Pellets and Oils all brought up in different articles. Which would be the best way to go?

If you need more info on him. He is a 5yr old Quarter Horse gelding who gets rode 6 days a week for 1-2hrs pretty good workout. He previously was on Purina Senior and Oats and after his 3rd episode of tying up I had him tested for PSSM.
 

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Welcome to the forum :)
There are two different trails of thought on it. One school says 15% fat, low starch, the other one says ESC-starch-fat not over 10%.
Then you'll need to supplement vit E, selenium for sure, best have your hay tested and supplement the rest according to what's missing in your hay.
We have a member, Oldhorselady, who is going through the ordeal with her horse, she has done the high fat diet, but just recently switched to the other one. I'll get you the link to get thread
 

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Yeah. Oldhorselady is doing an alternative to the high fat diet (HFD) due to her babies being easy keepers and her worry about them developing problems on the HFD. PM her and ask her to pop in on this thread if she doesn't see it soon. She's been in the PSSM game for a while with her two drafty types. Her perch mare has PSSM1 (like your horse) and her pinto has PSSM2.

I have one with with PSSM2. Her name's Baby Girl. She's hella cute: :lol:



She was diagnosed after she tied up once and almost died. She's a seven-year-old SSH, which isn't a breed normally associated with PSSM. Her pedigree does have some holes, especially the topside. On her official papers, those holes are all "unknown." I've never met another horse with a top side anything like hers. Possibly for good reason.

Flash of Lightening Spotted Saddle

Baby Girl represents the hard keeper PSSM population. I can barely keep her ribs covered when I'm campaigning her.

(By the way, PSSM1 and PSSM2 are treated the same way and act very similarly. There are some differences at the biochemical level, but we won't go into that.)

PSSM is all about what works for your horse. What your horse will tolerate and eat, his response to the diet, how much exercise is ideal... So I, nor anyone else, can give you a perfect plan. I mean, look at me and Oldhorselady. What I do to my PSSM horse would not work for hers and vice versa.

Here's what Baby Girl eats:

-- 6 pounds of Legends Performance Pellet. You aren't "suppose" to feed PSSM ponies grain, but Legends of 12.9% NSC, 10% fat, high vitamin E, and palatable. It's like they created a feed for hard keeper PSSMs. :lol: It was recommended to me by my horse's nutritionist.

-- Two cups of vegetable oil.

-- A natural vitamin E supplement that provides 2000 IU daily.

-- Electrolytes before every hard workout and daily during the summer. (I live in the south; it's very warm here!)

-- 24/7 access to a round bale of hay or grazing in a 40 acre pasture.


More important is what Baby Girl cannot eat:

-- Any sort of other grain, sweet feed, or treats. (I have special sugar free treats that taste like peppermints.)

-- Pasture in the summer during the day when the sugar in the grass is high. She wears a grazing muzzle, sometimes up to 18 hours a day. I supplement her forage with alfalfa. Lots of calories and low NCS.

-- Molasses, Gatorade, electrolytes with sugar, beet pulp without the molasses washed off, excessive apples and carrots, cereal grains (oats, corn, and other horrors).

Things Baby Girl cannot do:

-- Stay in a stall. NEVER. STALL. PSSM. HORSES. You must pasture board. Out 24/7.

-- No seriously. That's why she wears a grazing muzzle: to keep her moving all day AND keep her off too much grass.


I have a HorseForum journal as well. This is my current adventures with PSSM wonder horse and her adopted Arabian sister:

http://www.horseforum.com/member-journals/pt-3-chances-148627/

Here's an entry from about two years ago that chronicles BG's PSSM attack (post 104) and our first attempts at working through:

http://www.horseforum.com/member-journals/pt-2-lets-run-107975/page11/


Any questions? Feel free to ask! I love to talk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He is an easy keeper (but not to the extent where he looks at food and gains lol), but he gets worked hard like I said, and is a performance horse who is starting to haul more so I want to be sure his energy is kept up and he is getting what he needs with the diet switch.

I will be messaging her though for more information on PSSM!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So what is the reasoning for adding alfalfa pellets to their diet if they are on a good hay and low starch feed?
 
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