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Hi everyone! So I have not had my horse for a very long time, she is my first horse therefore I am very inexperienced with vaccines. I am moving her to a new barn and I would really like to get her up to date on her shots before Ido! BUT I do not know what to give her! I have heard of the West Nile and 4 way but are those only for the spring time? My new barn owner is certified to give my mare the shots but what are the most important shots? Help!! Thanks!
 

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See what the barn requires you to have, then call your vet. Usually, the most common ones we give are EWTWN (Eastern/western encephilitis and west nile), R/F (Rhino/flu), S/S (Strep/strangles) and rabies. Check with your state laws on rabies. Most require a licenced vet to give those.
 

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Three way (Tetanus, Eastern and Western Encephalitis) is considered the "basic" in most barns. Those make sense for sure.

Additional options are Equine Influenza and Equine Herpesvirus-1 (-> makes it 5-way). If you don't want to breed your mare, I personally would not vaccinate EHV-1. Herpes is a very complex virus and most adult horses (>80%) are infected. Vaccines against pretty much all Herpesviruses are notoriously ineffective. Vaccination does not prevent from infection, but only reduces some clinical signs (Rhino, and even that is arguable). It does absolutely nothing for the CNS form of EHV-1.
Influenza is a matter of personal preference. As with all Influenzaviruses, the vaccine is very strain specific, so your horse can still get infected with Influenza of a different strain. Also, immunity is really short lived in horses, so ideally it would have to be re-vaccinated ever 3-6 months. If my horse had a lot of contact with others, I would consider it, but if not I wouldn't bother.

Additional options are West Nile and Strangles. West Nile is mosquito transmitted and has been endemic to North America since 1999, so unless you live in the Arctic, it makes sense to vaccinate. The vaccine is pretty good.

I would vaccinate for Strangles in a boarding type situation with lots of horse movement.

Potomac Horse fever vaccines are pretty useless (weak immunity, not effective against all strains), so I wouldn't vaccinate that.
Rabies vaccination is possible, but not standard. I would consider it if the prevalence of Rabies is high in your region. I would discuss that with a vet for your region.

My horse (12 year old gelding, boarded, goes on trips to the mountains but not to shows) is vaccinated 3-way + WNV + Strangles.
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I ask this out of curiosity, not to be snarky because I genuinely don't know - where in the world do you live that barn owners have to be certified to give shots?

In the couple of (US) states where I have lived and kept horses, no certification is required to give shots, although most boarding barn owners have steered clear of giving vaccines to boarder horses (to make sure they cannot be perceived as practicing veterinary medicine without a license), although most will give shots for other reasons if prescribed by a vet (for example, antibiotics, sedatives for a horse slowly coming back into a work after a long layoff). Does the certification allow them to charge you specifically for administering the vaccine?

As far as vaccines go, even if not using the vet to administer them, do call your vet about which ones your horse needs. They can provide the best advice as to what is locally appropriate. Another good resource would be to look up the website of the closest university with a large veterinary science program and see their recommendations.
 

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I ask this out of curiosity, not to be snarky because I genuinely don't know - where in the world do you live that barn owners have to be certified to give shots?

In the couple of (US) states where I have lived and kept horses, no certification is required to give shots, although most boarding barn owners have steered clear of giving vaccines to boarder horses (to make sure they cannot be perceived as practicing veterinary medicine without a license), although most will give shots for other reasons if prescribed by a vet (for example, antibiotics, sedatives for a horse slowly coming back into a work after a long layoff). Does the certification allow them to charge you specifically for administering the vaccine?

As far as vaccines go, even if not using the vet to administer them, do call your vet about which ones your horse needs. They can provide the best advice as to what is locally appropriate. Another good resource would be to look up the website of the closest university with a large veterinary science program and see their recommendations.
I could be completely way off base but IME giving beef cattle vaccines; Im BQA (Beef Quality Assurance) certified. I can give injections without it legally but my certification shows I have technical training to give injections. People are more likely to hire someone with the certificate. Now this isn't always the case and just because you know the technical stuff doesn't mean you're good at it. But I'm thinking its the same case. Just like I have a equine nutrition certificate as well. It looks "good".
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If you are in the US, I would absolutely NOT miss on the Rabies Vaccine. If you are having your vet do the shots (easiest and not that much more expensive), I like to use Vetera Gold + VEE, one shot and you hit all the basics, and then have Rabies given separately. Vetera Gold Vaccines

Rabies is 100% lethal if a horse gets it. If I couldn't afford another shot, that's the one they'd all get.
 
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