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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm not quite asking for critique(gentle little tips are ok-- I'm not a type of person who handles serious crit well), but-- what's he doing? I had put my leg back to ask for the canter. Then he went into this smooth gait that I cannot recognize.

This was our first time cantering for a while since the vet cleared him from his white line. We only cantered.. 2? times around, I think.

We should be starting dressage lessons soon, if I can build up the guts to ask a boarder for her instructor's information.


Keep in mind that he's not my horse-- I'm *supposed* to be leasing him.

PS. It's early in the video-- around 10-15 sec point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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He was cantering but I think he took off on the wrong lead and it was too hard for him to continue unbalanced so he went from canter to a fast trot and then back to canter to get on the correct lead so it would be more comfortable and balanced for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, he was on the wrong lead at first. But there's nothing off about the couple of seconds RIGHT before he starts actually cantering, after his 'jumpstart'? He's always done this tiny 'hop' before trotting or cantering. Hopefully the dressage training will stop that.. I've ridden a few horses that do it, and it's annoying.
 

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looked like he was cross cantering then corrected himself. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it is usually very clear if your horse is gaited (really NOT that familiar with gated horses, other than the hunters here love them)
 

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What I saw was that your horse runs into the canter, throwing it's front legs forward into it and then bringing it's hindlegs under himself unlike a horse who bringing his hindend under himself and pushes into the canter. This stems from a horse that has not be properly trained how to achieve a balanced canter and needs to be taught how to cope with the riders weight.
 

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What I saw was that your horse runs into the canter, throwing it's front legs forward into it and then bringing it's hindlegs under himself unlike a horse who bringing his hindend under himself and pushes into the canter. This stems from a horse that has not be properly trained how to achieve a balanced canter and needs to be taught how to cope with the riders weight.

Agree.
It was the wrong lead canter, then he corrected himself after you went around the corner. It was all very unbalanced & rushy.
 
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