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I highly suggest you start reading George Morris and his critique columns in the Practicle Horseman Magazine, and look into his books.

There is alot involved.
 

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I am not a hunter rider....I am not an equitation rider....I event and jump. The best position is any position that allows you to flow with your horse, offering little or no interference. I don't like people who "perch" and over arch their backs, as is done in hunters. It only shuts your seat down (back is too stiff you allow the seat to flow with the horse). That is one reason hunter riders don't sit the canter. It throws away your best jumping aid....seat.


OK, now that I have aggravated all the hunter riders here, flame on.
 

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maybe get a few lessons just to learn the basics of jumping
but you have to go into two point postion(your butt of the saddle only slightly)
put your hands say about halfway up your horses neck and keep your arms there for a few strides after the jump so you dont yank on the horses mouth

but I would highly recommened a lesson just for the first few times you jump
 

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I don't like people who "perch" and over arch their backs, as is done in hunters. It only shuts your seat down (back is too stiff you allow the seat to flow with the horse). That is one reason hunter riders don't sit the canter. It throws away your best jumping aid....seat.
Allison, I wholeheartedly agree with you. You are absolutely correct. Hunter form is an assanign form, and unfunctional.
 

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SO TRUE!!!!! I have nothing against good, functional, hunter riders, but those who perch really tick me off! ;)

Again, I agree, READ GM!!!!! I have learned SO much!
 

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I am not a hunter rider....I am not an equitation rider....I event and jump. The best position is any position that allows you to flow with your horse, offering little or no interference. I don't like people who "perch" and over arch their backs, as is done in hunters. It only shuts your seat down (back is too stiff you allow the seat to flow with the horse). That is one reason hunter riders don't sit the canter. It throws away your best jumping aid....seat.


OK, now that I have aggravated all the hunter riders here, flame on.
Agreed! Although ALOT of Hunters do perch and arch their backs, their are some who do not do this. My barn is a hunter barn, but they do not teach us to perch/arch back. My instructor wont let you go past a crossrail if your posiion isnt perfect. But I know exacly what your talking about, I see it at hunter shows all the time and it makes me cringe.

Like you I believe in really going with your horses movment and NEVER catching them in the mouth, I get soooo mad when I see this.
 

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Get some lessons, don't attempt to teach yourself as you won't be able to tell if you're doing it right or not. You could get a book on jumping to learn more and watch proffesionals on TV or YouTube.
 

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As a hunter rider I'd be more aggravated by some of the above posts if I didn't see a lot of ineffective riding. But I would ask that you please not generalize an ENTIRE discipline, as there are more then a few hunter riders who are quite effective. The eventers I've seen in my area are downright terrifying to the point of being a liability. To say all eventers are hazardous to themselves and their horses would be a gross generalization. Personally I think the majority of the perching and posing is seen in the Equitation ring, where it's important to sit pretty. Technically in the hunters the rider could be riding upside down and still win if the round is nice.

Back to the OP, I second reading some books and articles from George Morris, particularly Hunt Seat Equitation. He gets to the basics and breaks down form and function, and explains the WHYs. IMO all beginners should start off with correct basics. Yes, upper level riders can be quite effective and surprisingly secure in their nontraditional forms but most starting off can't. There's really too much to list and explain in just one post.
 

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I highly suggest you start reading George Morris and his critique columns in the Practicle Horseman Magazine, and look into his books.

There is alot involved.
I also recommend the book "Form Over Fences" by Jane M. Dillon. It's and old book but all the foundation is there.

ETA: I agree with you Upnover.... there are awful examples in all disciplines. Most of the eventers I've seen in the jumper classes at the regional shows make me cringe, more so then most hunter rounds. But then again everything at the lower levels is compounded and bad usually.
 

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I'll second GM. Get his book Hunter Seat Equitation - it's a classic for a reason. My copy is falling apart and full of highlighted areas and little notes, haha!
 

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ETA: I agree with you Upnover.... there are awful examples in all disciplines. Most of the eventers I've seen in the jumper classes at the regional shows make me cringe, more so then most hunter rounds. But then again everything at the lower levels is compounded and bad usually.
There's a difference though - most aren't taught educatedly and most just point and shoot at low level Eventing. Where Hunters, are taught to perch, taught to ride the way they do, because it wins in the show ring. It is a trend.

Difference between being taught to do it, and doing it because they don't know any better.
 

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There's a difference though - most aren't taught educatedly and most just point and shoot at low level Eventing. Where Hunters, are taught to perch, taught to ride the way they do, because it wins in the show ring. It is a trend.

Difference between being taught to do it, and doing it because they don't know any better.
Those are both generalizations. I was never taught to perch. ;)
 

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You may not of been taught, but many have and many still continue to be taught today. Even GM rants about it in his columns. :)
 

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Of course not ALL hunter riders perch. However, it is being taught more and more. Anyone who watches the Medal McClay finals will see good effective riders who still manage to look nice. I event, but I often have decent equitation, even though I've never participated in hunters.

One of my pet peeves is to see better riders still using beginner crest releases. Does anyone teach better riders to follow their horses mouths anymore without hurting them? I will sometimes use crest releases on various XC fences, but usually not in SJ.
 

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I think were getting off topic here guys. Discussing what displine is taught to perch is not going to help the OP. So lets leave it at SOME people in ANY discilpline do perch, which isnt the proper jumping position.
 

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The way Pinto Pony (the user on here) rides. THAT is darn near perfect.
 

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So true Drew!!!!

Jordan- that picture shows anything but perfect. The rider is way ahead of the motion, which is a big problem.

Eventers might look "terifying" because they arn't in the perfect position. Unless they are riding unsafly, I don't look at position much. Functionality is the most important thing. BUT you must learn a good position before you can learn to be functional.
 
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