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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I feel like ~75% of the young gray ads say the horse is roan and even though i am not looking to buy it drives me insane since it is not correct. Especially because one of the parents has to be gray, it's not a surprise.

Why is there such a bias against gray?

I am vaguely aware there is a higher chance of some sort of growth things later in life but i didn't figure that was the case?
 

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IMO, I think most people just don't know the difference between a roan and a grey,so they say it's a grey when really its not. Nothing against them though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I could see that if someone got it from an auction or killpen. But i guess i don't think the number of ads for it makes sense to all be second owners from mystery horse backgrounds. Some of them bred the horses themselves.
 

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And that doesn't make them more likely to know anything about color genetics. To many people roan is the hot ticket. Who doesn't want a blue roan....sounds rare and exotic. If you can get more for that then why sell a plain Jane gray?
 

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Not a fashionable colour, getting lighter as it ages so harder to keep clean and melanomas. Greys were the in thing when I was young, now I often read adverts that say 'no greys'.
 

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I wouldn't buy a gray by choice. Or any light-colored horse, especially those with pink skin around their eyes and nostrils. To me, all light colors are nothing but trouble plus they are not pretty (except darker dapple grays, which don't stay that way). Don't know why others don't like them, though. I'd consider a roan.
 

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And that doesn't make them more likely to know anything about color genetics. To many people roan is the hot ticket. Who doesn't want a blue roan....sounds rare and exotic. If you can get more for that then why sell a plain Jane gray?
I think people should know the truth sbout everything so they know they really want the horse still!
 

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They are not lying if they do not know the difference. But, yes, there are people that take advantage of those that dont know.

I really hate reading and seeing that so many consider sellers dishonest. As a seller I could certainly say the same of buyers that are not honest about their skill level, experience or direction you want to go with your purchase. I also don't like the know it all attitude that comes with those that think they can train a horse but have no clue - all because they watched some video.

You see it goes both ways.
 

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There are a lot of people who honestly don't know the difference ,between a roan and a horse turning grey.

Wouldn't own a grey horse melanomas are likely when they get older. So nope won't touch a grey horse with a ten foot pole.

Won't own anything with lage amounts of pink skin either. Pink around eyes is a no go, bald face is a no go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ah okay, i didn't realize that many people couldn't tell. I personally haven't had a bad experience buying from a breeder. I did pass on buying from some horse flippers/commission sellers that i felt like were dishonest or had a bunch of sick horses or whatever issues. Or desperately trying to get me to leave with anything, i came for gaited mares they pushed non-gaited geldings because they had a lot of them i guess. One mare had such a bad cough i couldnt even comfortably attempt a test ride.

Im not horribly against gray i just wouldn't seek it out specifically. I have just seen more grays as roans for sale locally than i have seen actual roans for sale. I guess i have just found it surprising and given some of my bad shopping experiences, i assumed it was sellers trying to take advantage of the naive. And was wondering why buyers were so opposed to begin with.

I did buy a gelding with a horribly pink nose, one of the 2 reasons i initially passed on him. Then he ended up being the better of the horses i looked at. So sunscreen and fly masks it is.

I feel like i tend to say i am a level below my experience level when horse shopping because i just don't like dealing with super hot horses or major problems.
 

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I like greys because they will eventually turn white. Yes I know they are still considered greys. Of the 14 horses I have had in my life none were grey. Yet it is a white horse that comes to me in my dreams. Greys are higher maintanence, they show dirt and stains to be groomed away and have to be watched for melanomas. I hope the final horse of my life will be grey and turn white. Then my hair will match my horse without being dyed.

I have alwas dyed my hair to match my horse- auburn for blood bay, red for chestnuts, black for black although it looks harsh. Although I never bleached blond to match my palomino, that damages the hair too much and would look trashy. Now I have a black bay and the first that matches my natural hair color. Although I still have to dye my hair because if I don't the roots grow out and it looks like ..... I have a skunk on my head
 

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Grays are at a substantially higher risk of developing melanoma because gray is actually a pigment disease. It causes horses to be born with excessive pigment, and then the pigment cells basically die because they are overworked, making the horse have no pigment in their hair. Then after a few years some pigment cells will sort of revive, especially in heterozygous horses, causing them to be fleabitten. Melanomas can be deadly and are a hassle to deal with. Also, I am just not a fan of the color in general.
 

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I worked at a horse farm that lost a grey mare to melanomas. Had them internally also extremely. Had to be pts due to rapid decline in health.

Owner had had some of the external one removed but they came back with a vengeance.

Vet did a necropsy and horse was full of melanomas internally.

Know someone who's grey geldings sheath is just full of melanomas, as far as vet could reach up in there. His fate will be pts. So grey is a never own color of horse.
 

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How often do grays tend to get the melanomas?
I don't know what the statistics are, but I think it's actually less than they say, because I've owned 3 grays and NEVER had a problem with melanomas. I've owned ONE Paint and he did develop some skin cancers, but by the time he had to be euthanized in his old age it was because he was arthritic and crippled up, not the cancers that got him.

So I've had 3 grays........

One was an Arabian gelding that I bought around the age of 14 and kept him until he died of colic at age 24. Could it have been melanoma? Anything is possible but he NEVER had a single outward melanoma anywhere on his body, so I kind of doubt it.

Second gray was a 16 yr old Fox Trotter mare. She had two external melanomas, the biggest was the size of a small pencil eraser. She died in her mid 20's from unknown causes (new owners suddenly found her dead overnight) and so I kind of doubt it was the melanomas. They never seemed to grow or spread in any way and I kept her until about 2 years before she died.

Third gray was the son of the Fox Trotter mare and I kept him until he was 8 and sold him on because he was too much horse for me. He's still young, but no signs of melanomas when I sold him or currently as far as I know.

So for me, personally, it is a non-issue. I've loved my grays and never had a problem with melanomas on any of them. If I used other people's logic, it's Paint horses I would be avoiding like the plague! But I like them too!

Back to the main subject, I find it VERY common that people will be selling youngish grays and calling them roans. I just think they don't know the difference. There was one on my local Craigslist just a few days ago, obviously a gray. People are just ignorant. I once met a lady with a varnish roan Appalooosa that she just bought and was calling it a Paint because someone told her it was a Paint. I'm like, Google "varnish roan Appaloosa." ;)

Sometimes we have to stop and realize that not everyone is on the Internet researching EVERYTHING about horses they way we are! It's obvious to most of us.......not to the general public, even the general horse-owning public. Think of what else they don't know about horses!

Anyway, I would never pass on an otherwise great horse because of the color. And I think greys are lovely! I dislike pink-skinned horses more, but would probably own of those if the right one came a long. A good horse is never a bad color. And if gray is a bad color, what about pink skinned horses prone to squamous cell carcinomas? What about Appaloosas (prone to moon blindness)? What about silver dapple horses.......also prone to eye issues I believe? What about all the muscular Quarter Horses on tiny little feet prone to navicular? THAT worries me more. With my luck they would go crippled and I'd be feeding them for 20 years and unable to ride. Almost every horse has it's risks.

Now I would probably not BUY a horse with melanomas. I did check my mare over head-to-toe when I bought her, lifted up her tail and examined it and her genitalia and everything. But I would buy a grey that looked fine. To each their own.......I've loved my greys! Yes, they could die, but they will all die of something.
 

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I've had greys my whole life. Arabs and Andalusians, so it's kind of a standard issue color. Yes, some did get melanomas, but I don't feel like it shortened their lives at all. It's not like they were passing away at 7. They were in their late 20s when their time came to humanely euthanize. It's true that melanomas are no walk in the park, but I wouldn't shy away from a good horse based on color.

I am ignorant of people advertising horses that are grey as "roan" however, but I'm perhaps looking in the wrong area (if I'm being honest, I'd be looking at Friesians for sale and they only come in one color).
 

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Not to change the subject too much but what about all the people people getting melanomas from lying around in the sun or just everyday sun exposure? My uncle developed a black spot under his thumb nail. He thought it was because he must have accidently hit his thumb with a hammer. Now he's dead.
 

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Any horse with pink skin in any location is likely to burn in those places if exposed to sun.

My grey lived to 40 according to the family she was given to when I moved here. No melanoma. Qtr Arabian cross.
 
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