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Discussion Starter #1
Soooo the last time we wormed my horse was maybe in 2012 :oops:. He's been doing fine really but I know the importance of deworming and stuff. We bought some Ivermectin stuff but haven't used it, we may wait until December/January to give it.

We emailed Roman's previous owner and she gave us advice. To deworm in the spring and winter. So what should we deworm him with? We'll give him the Ivermectin this winter but what for spring?

He's on pasture 24/7 and I rarely give him grain. In the winter he has Brome hay.

When and what do you give your horse for deworming?
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I deworm my horse twice a year- once with a 'regular' dewormer (ivermectin, fenbendazole, or pyrantel pamaote) and once with one containing praziquantel for tapeworms. In between deworming I run a fecal egg count (FEC) to see if additional deworming is needed, but so far I've never needed any extra deworming.

Since your horse hasn't been dewormed in a while, you might want to start with a FEC to see what you're dealing with. If your horse has a heavy worm load and you kill them off all at once you run the risk of causing an impaction colic. Running regular FECs will also let you know if your horse is a high or low shedder of worm eggs and if your deworming program is working.
 
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If your horse is with other horses that also don't get dewormed or ones that come and go, it is likely that he has worms. If he has been with the same horses since the last deworming, it is less likely he has worms.

Our horses are kept on our property and don't get dewormed on a regular basis. When a new horse is brought into the herd, all get dewormed as a precaution. We've never had a worm infestation problem doing this.

It would be best to have a FEC done before deworming. You may not even need to deworm him.

Many vets are going away from routine deworming schedules. Worms can build up a resistance to dewormers when overused.

Since your horse hasn't been dewormed in a while, I would use Zimectrin Gold or something similar for tapeworms. They don't show up in a FEC.
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About 50% of horses can control their own worm load, so it is very important to test every horse, because each horse is different. This also means it doesn't really matter if horses come and go, if you're horse can take care of its self it will. At the same time, they could be alone and wormy, the other horses really don't matter that much. I would wait until there has been a hard frost at this point. If he has a high count you will need to deworm and test again in a couple weeks. Depending on the results you may need to deworm again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Should we do a FEC before deworming Dec/Jan or afterwards? It'll be a few months but a horse clinic probably 15 min. away does FEC.
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read up on using DE for deworming naturally. I personally don't give my horses the chemical stuff unless there's something that can't be killed by DE.
 

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I am a big fan of running fecal egg counts and than deworming. I run an egg count, deworm based on those results (once a year hit them with a praziquantel to get rid of tapes) and than run an egg count in 1 -3 weeks later to see if the wormer was effective. The issue the egg counts target are resistant worms. As an example, we have an 28 year old mare who shows up negative on her egg counts, we have a 14 year old who consistently has a high worm burden and requires multiple different wormings with multiple products before she is "cleared". The 14 year old without egg counts would develop resistant parasites because those parasite are exposed to wormer frequently and survive. Thus those resistant "super worms" would go not to infect the rest of the herd. The egg count after worming is the most important one.

I am not a fan of diatomaceous earth because I have not seen it be effective. Like a lot of homeopathic remedies such as amber for flea control it works in very rare cases. The fact of the matter is that if things like diatomaceous earth worked than every pharmaceutical company on the planet would be using it for flea control and it would cost a lot of money. I am not a fan of many homeopathic remedies for parasite control because I have seen the fecal egg counts of animals on homeopathic remedies.
 

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Roman if your horse is kept in an isolated situation - not with a constantly changing stream of new horses - it most likely has no problems - other than whatever worms it may have brought with him and since contaminated his pasture
Having a worm count is good because it will give you an idea of what sort of a burden he has but tapeworm, encysted worms and bots won't show up on it so doing him twice a year with the correct active is still going to be needed
Be careful of the cheap wormers on the market - some aren't as strong as they need to be to do the job properly
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He is in a pasture with 10 cows. The only access to other horses at the moment is over the fence, and he'll soon have access to the horses on the other side of us. Sometimes he won't have access at all depending when we open and close off the other pastures. But he will have a horse in the pasture with him soon if we buy another.
 

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Worm larvae can migrate and since you have no control over the horses in the adjacent fields to yours you probably should get into a good worming regime and stick with it especially if you have another horse coming
Grazing with cattle can reduce worm contamination in a pasture especially if you don't have a daily poo picking routine
 
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