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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve always had interest in raising and/or training a young horse for myself, whether I get it at 2 months or 4 years.

But how does one know when they are ready to do this? Do you just...jump in? Is there a list of things you should know? Trial and error?

Obviously taking on a horse to train is huge...so how did you know you were ready?

Thanks!
 

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When you have adult supervision and a mentor to guide you after you have worked consistently with someone that has experience and turns out horses with no holes in their training, progressing steadily in the skills you learn through years of hard work...that specifically focuses on training youngsters and horses new to being handled.
 

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IMHO, Respectfully, if a person has to ask —— they aren’t ready:)

Anyone lacking enough experiences for colt starting NEEDS to have the strong and long term guidance of someone with a lot of experience and who is fair minded.

I was 12 when I started training my grandfather’s newborns, clear up thru the time they were sold. They were trained to drive first (long line which is not lunging) then to carry a rider.

The operative word ^^^^being “grandfather“. He was my cushion until his passing, when I was in my 20’s. I miss him to this very day and I am retired——-

Depending on the “heart condition” of the person doing the training and their mentor, there is a lot more to starting colts than just getting a halter on them and teaching them to lead or putting a bridle on them and hoping they don’t buck you off.

I started a lot of my grandfather’s babies, a few of my own, and finished off some that were barely broke Enough to get them in the trailer to bring them home. I never had a youngster try to buck me off or run away — my grandfather must have been doing something right and passed it along, in a correct way to me. <——-further to that, I accomplished everything without lunging or benefit of a round pen:):)

Horses aren’t machinery and there is no absolute black and white time frame or pattern to follow, as they learn at their own rate(s), some much faster than others.

EDITED TO ADD: I was typing the same time as @QtrBel . We pretty much said the same thing:)
 

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Walkin was fortunate. I didn't dive in I was pushed. Not fair to me or the horses. That said I did have experience with hard to handle retraining of older horses so not completely out of depth. My blessing and fortune came with mentors that came along and shared as well as guiding me through filling the holes I created. As well as the patience and pocketbook of the person that did the pushing and was willing to send me to various trainers for extended private instruction at their expense.

Walkin's way is much better for both parties.
 

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I agree with having a mentor. Possibly assisting in someone else's horses first. I also wasnt started the right way.... In middle school my mom basically used me as her crash dummy on 3 two year olds she bought. So I learned a little from her, but the rest I have picked up online and from working with some green horses since. I do currently have someone I can occasionally ask questions or get help from, she is just busier than I would like sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input! One day I’ll train a horse...although I have no idea when that will be.
 

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Walkin was fortunate. I didn't dive in I was pushed. Not fair to me or the horses. That said I did have experience with hard to handle retraining of older horses so not completely out of depth. My blessing and fortune came with mentors that came along and shared as well as guiding me through filling the holes I created. As well as the patience and pocketbook of the person that did the pushing and was willing to send me to various trainers for extended private instruction at their expense.

Walkin's way is much better for both parties.
Yeah, I was kinda pushed in. Definitely wasn’t ready to train 3 ponies and now red and daisy
 

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I grew up with horses, went without for quite a long time, and now have horses again as an adult. I never spent a day of my life with an animal of some sort, usually multiples, and I trained the vast majority of them (and sometimes retrained rescues with issues). I have been completely immersed in the horse world for the past 5 years, not just as an owner and rider and the mom of a competitive rider, but also taking various equine care and training courses (liberty work, ground work, etc.), as show manager, organizing clinics, etc. I wouldn't think for a minute that I can train a foal.

Two years ago I bought a very green 6 year old who has the most quiet, level-headed mind you could imagine for a horse that age. And he's ALL I can handle. The progress with him is SLOWWWWWW. I have worked with coaches and trainers, but the reality is that I don't have the knowledge to train a horse. I think it takes decades of experience, and as everyone else points out, working under a mentor, to be able to do this. Otherwise, you're grasping. You will make numerous mistakes. Horses don't take well to trial and error, generally. My horse is patient and forgiving, and I really just want to have fun with him (not compete), but I have made mistakes (luckily nothing serious because we are progressing very, very slowly, never rushing anything). There is nothing worse than horse with potential that is ruined by someone who is ill-equipped to train it. That's why there are so many problem horses out there. It's so much better for everyone to let the pros handle the training so horses don't get messed up for life, have holes in their training that will cause them to lose their minds someday, or become nervous, spooky horses because they don't understand what you want from them.

If you want to train, find someone who is a good trainer and beg and plead with them to let you follow them around and scoop manure for them or whatever other menial task they have to give you. It will be worth it.
 
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