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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I just recently rescued a stud colt from an auction obviously with the intention of getting him gelded but wanted to know everyone’s opinion on when to get him gelded I want him to grow and develop properly... He hasn’t shown any studdy behavior yet but was also curious when horses typically start displaying those behaviors as well?
 

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Hi all! I just recently rescued a stud colt from an auction obviously with the intention of getting him gelded but wanted to know everyone’s opinion on when to get him gelded I want him to grow and develop properly... He hasn’t shown any studdy behavior yet but was also curious when horses typically start displaying those behaviors as well?
A lot of that depends on the colt. If he's healthy and not been handled much, he could start being studdy just as soon as you have him fed up and healthy. I, personally, like to geld mine as early as I can, have done it at 10 weeks. Others, I've not done until they were adults and I determined I wasn't going to breed them for whatever reason. So, since you know you plan to geld this one, as soon as he's healthy enough to withstand the anesthesia and surgery.
 

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I personally would have a colt gelded somewhere between the ages of one and three depending on the behavior of the individual horse.

Gelding does affect the growth and closure of their bones (gelding slightly delays this). I would prefer to give them a chance to develop the way that they were intended to before any alterations were made but that is me. Later gelding does leave a lot more room for mismanagement so I guess it all depends on the horse and their owner and what can be tolerated.
 

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That depends--

If you were to wait, do you have experience handling and training stud colts?
Do you have safe housing and high fences for a stud colt?
If you board, are stallions allowed?
Are you comfortable dealing with some possible 'studdy' behavior should you elect to let your colt grow up a bit first?

or, are you a relatively novice horse owner?
Do you need to keep your youngster in a mixed group including fillies/mares?
Do you board and stallions are discouraged?
Are you uncomfortable about handling a horse who may be more prone to nipping, charging, or otherwise acting the fool unless taught otherwise?

You can geld as soon as the colt is healthy enough for anesthesia. Most people prefer to wait until after a hard freeze in the fall if the colt will be kept outdoors to help eliminate the risk of flies irritating or infecting the incision site. If you're ok with handling a young stallion, you can wait--- most 'studdy' behaviors are relatively easily managed by someone experienced, and handling a stallion is not all that different than a gelding if you know what you're doing and have high, safe fences and suitable housing (other geldings/stallions to turn him out with) and your colt is well-mannered to start. In that case, waiting until he's older is not a big deal. I've had it done anywhere from 7 months to 3 years, and have also had aged stallions gelded. It just depends on your circumstances and comfort level and facilities.
 

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Gelding does affect the growth and closure of their bones (gelding slightly delays this). I would prefer to give them a chance to develop the way that they were intended to before any alterations were made but that is me.

In general, you do expect a stallion to be shorter than they would have been if they were gelded immediately, but the significance and/or amount of the height difference is unknown and not scientifically proven.


.....unless you've seen research that I have not. Then please, do enlighten me.




Hi all! I just recently rescued a stud colt from an auction obviously with the intention of getting him gelded but wanted to know everyone’s opinion on when to get him gelded I want him to grow and develop properly... He hasn’t shown any studdy behavior yet but was also curious when horses typically start displaying those behaviors as well?

Personally, I geld them once both testicles drop. Usually around 1 year of age, give or take.
 

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In general, you do expect a stallion to be shorter than they would have been if they were gelded immediately, but the significance and/or amount of the height difference is unknown and not scientifically proven.


.....unless you've seen research that I have not. Then please, do enlighten me.
It is a pretty well know fact that early altering does affect the growth and timing of bone closure in all animals. The significance for horses is not something that I claimed. I merely said what I would do if it were my colt and what my preference would be.
 

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I think a lot of it would be determined by the person's definition of "colt". Out here, anything under 5 can and is referred to as a colt by some folks. Others, under 1 year. Others, it's any unbred male horse regardless of age. So, OP, what's your definition of "colt"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think a lot of it would be determined by the person's definition of "colt". Out here, anything under 5 can and is referred to as a colt by some folks. Others, under 1 year. Others, it's any unbred male horse regardless of age. So, OP, what's your definition of "colt"?
He is a year, or a little under a year! Vet is coming tomorrow to look him over just wanted to get some other opinions on this topic!
 

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A little under a year, but your timing should be right so it's a season when there's no flies.
 

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We usually geld between 1 and 2 years, depending on the horse and the time of year. Fall is a good time because the weather is cooler and the flies aren't as bad.
 

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It is a pretty well know fact that early altering does affect the growth and timing of bone closure in all animals. The significance for horses is not something that I claimed. I merely said what I would do if it were my colt and what my preference would be.

If gelding at 1 year is not statistically significant from gelding at 3 years, then age shouldn't be a factor in a person's decision making. Yes, as I said, the general thought is that horses will be shorter if they are kept a stallion (due to hormones) but honestly, by how much? And what is the significance of growth plate closure? What will it affect (positively or negatively) with the horse's development?


I'm not intending to question your opinion and what you do with your horses, because that's your choice, but questioning the "fact" of how hormone changes affect growth and development, and if it is significant enough to matter when bringing the topic to others' attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Update: Teddy will most likely be gelded next month one the flies have died down some! Thank you for everyone’s opinions they are very much appreciated!
 

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Make sure he's up to date on vaccines especially tetanus. He's a very cute horse. The sooner you get the vaccines done the better.
 

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If gelding at 1 year is not statistically significant from gelding at 3 years, then age shouldn't be a factor in a person's decision making. Yes, as I said, the general thought is that horses will be shorter if they are kept a stallion (due to hormones) but honestly, by how much? And what is the significance of growth plate closure? What will it affect (positively or negatively) with the horse's development?


I'm not intending to question your opinion and what you do with your horses, because that's your choice, but questioning the "fact" of how hormone changes affect growth and development, and if it is significant enough to matter when bringing the topic to others' attention.
The fact is that there hasn't been much study on the significance of what early gelding does to a horse and how it affects their growth. For that reason alone, I would wait for as long as I could. Biologically, having testicles is not detrimental to the horse. Living in humans society with testicles might be.

Fifty years ago, when the big campaign on early spay and neuter for dogs and cats began there were also no significant studies done on how it affects their growth. Now, they are finding in many circumstances it is detrimental to their growth and health.

As for the reasoning of saying between one and three is just a matter of trying to be reasonable. If it were my animal, I would wait until fully mature if at all possible. Of course, many other things could factor in for an earlier procedure. Mostly human convenience or inconvenience factors.

The OP brought the topic to attention by asking for peoples opinions. I have stated mine just as others have stated theirs. I certainly would not question others on why they would do an early gelding as I am sure they would have their reasons. The bottom line is that it is their colt and their decision even after gathering others opinions on the matter.
 
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