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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a six year old gelding that I bought last year. I like him a lot but we seem to have some problems. A month or two after I bought him he threw me off and I broke my arm and ankle. It is hard to trust him because he is buddy sour and sometimes chargers at you and around the arena like a maniac. Recently he bit me and broke my finger (minor brake wasn't to bad) and took off skin. Sometimes he wont load in the trailer. There are times when he listens and does what I ask but only when he feels like it. I wonder if maybe he just doesn't like me or maybe I am not the right owner. Maybe since he is young he needs someone who wants to train him. please HELP!!!! :cry: :?
 

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Well, I think he would be a hard sell right now. I would also think that some of the behaviors, i.e. biting and charging are the result of a lack of leadership. Which means that they could occur in the next horse you purchase. I would look at finding a good trainer to work with you and the horse. They would be able to assess if he is too much horse.
 

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Yes, it's time to sell; and no, it's not impossible to find a buyer. (You'll have to disclose all of the horse's faults, though, and expect to sell cheap.)

You've read it here before: "Green rider plus green horse = black-and-blue." It's never a good idea for an inexperienced rider to purchase a young/green horse. You've shown why -- the horse does not recognize you as dominant/alpha/a leader, and that causes a plethora of problems that can be quite dangerous (as your numerous broken bones can attest).

There's NO SHAME in re-homing a horse that doesn't match up well with you, and I hope that you don't give up on riding. You simply need more experience with a horse that's more appropriate -- probably an older, well-broke, been-there-done-that horse who is very forgiving with beginner riders. In the meantime, take lessons, watch videos (there are plenty on Youtube), and read-up on horses. You'll get there -- just not with this horse.

Good luck!
 

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Would this be a sorrel and white paint gelding? He sounds eerily familiar to a gelding I knew right down to the age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am not a green rider i have been riding my entire life. I havent though worked especially with green horses, me and this horse have been having some problems. I am going to talk to my trainer and work with this horse hopefully i dont get hurt again. I am determined to work with my green horse. I know it is a lack of leadership and i have been working on disipline with this particular gelding!!!!!!
Thank you everyone for you opinions :)
 

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It's of course a personal decision but my two cents are that since this is a hobby most of us choose because it makes us genuinely happy like few other things do, sacrificing that happiness for a horse that makes us feel uncomfortable isn't worth it.

Don't confuse this with avoiding challenges that could ultimately allow you to grow as a horseman, because I personally see a lot of value in doing things that challenge myself in order to become better or push past a small barrier/obstacle in myself. Rather I think you should sit down and consider wether your personal safety and health is worth working with this horse.

As you've said, you're determined and know that it's a leadership problem. It's hard to diagnose over the internet of course but it does sound like he's pushing your leadership role to see if he actually has to listen to you. Happy to hear that you have a trainer who can help you through this! I wish you the best of luck :)

Ultimately, if you and your trainer decide this horse is not for you for whatever reason do not be hard on yourself about it. An unhappy horse and owner, just for the sake of toughing something out, is silly. Even in a tough market you can sell him. Probably for cheap, and you'd have to wait for the right buyer to come along but I don't think it would be impossible.
 

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I hope it works out well for you, but just because you are not a green rider does not mean you are not a green trainer. Every time you are interacting with a green horse. Every. Single. Time. No matter if you are on the ground, in the saddle, just popping by for a minute or there for hours, you are training him. He is learning based on how you react, respond, and what he is allowed to do and practice. Lots of riding experience may or may not be at all helpful when it comes to training experience and a green horse. Some instructors teach riding and training, some teach riding and not so much training.

I hope you can find a trainer (not necessarily a riding instructor) to help teach you how to retrain this horse out of the bad habits he has learned he can do. If not, please look after your own safety! Horses don't magically learn to be safe and sane with age, so unless you're able and want to retrain him, selling him as green with a few bad habits is probably best.
 
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