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Which is smarter?

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I'm interested in talking about what you think about horses and donkeys. Which one do you think is smarter, the horse, or the donkey?
 

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I would say the donkey.

A simple,example - the field has a shelter, it is pouring with rain and a strong wind. The donkey will go into the shelter, the horse will remain outside shivering - unless it has a donkey in the field whereby it will follow the donkey into the shelter.
 

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I prefer to look at the two from a common sense perspective.

As humans go, I know people who are bloody academic genius, but they can't get themselves across a street without getting run over by a bicycle. --- they lack the good common sense "God Gave a Goose" as my neighbor likes to say.

That means I think there are no stupid horses, but they are lacking in the degree of common sense a donkey seems to have:):)

^^^This means I did not vote because you don't have a third option:cowboy:
 

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I thought my horse was smart until I let her out in the pasture one day just to see her lose her mind for 20 minutes when she couldn't find her buddies. She never thought to check the back of the pasture. I had to catch her in her manic state so I could DRAG her kicking and screaming to the back of the pasture (NO, mom, I SWEAR, they are HIDING inside the run-in walls!) where she calmed down immediately when she saw her buddies.

I have also seen a big draft try to play with a later-confirmed rabid skunk.

I do think donkeys have more common sense, but I think I might just see them as more sensible because they're a lot less likely to have a flight reaction and "shut off" their brains than a horse. They seem to have more independent thinking whereas horses are very herd-dependent to make their decisions. But I have also seen donkeys run out into traffic and die getting hit by a car (not running from anything, just exploring), so I definitely wouldn't call that common sense either...

Hard to tell, really.
 

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It depends on now long the donkey has been dead. If less than 3 days then the donkey is still smarter but after 3 days the horse will be smarter. Basically, if a donkey is breathing (or was at recently breathing) it will be smarter than a horse. Mules are smarter than horses too, but not smarter than a donkey. But don't ne too hard on the horse, because you need to remember that donkeys are not equine (unlike dogs and wolves, donkeys and horses are not the same family)

There's an old horse joke I was once told when I was young, but not entirely a joke.
If you have an accident while hauling a horse in a trailer and the horse suffers a minor injury the horse is always going to remember that it was injured in that trailer and loading it into that trailer again could be a problem.
If you have an accident while hauling a mule in a trailer and the mule has a minor injury the mule is always going to remember the "YOU" put him in the trailer.
The mule is smarter enough to realize that it wasn't the trailer to blame, but the person who put it in the trailer.
 

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Since your poll only had the 2 options I'm saying donkey too. But my more accurate answer would be 'it depends' & basically what Walkin said. If you judge smartness on ability to climb a tree, well...

I think from a human type intelligence point of view, donks are 'smarter'. They will size up a situation first before deciding how best to respond, whereas horses tend to react first, think later. And I believe donks are labeled 'stubborn' because they learn they're bigger & uglier(well, beauty is in the eye of the beerholder. ..) than puny people and they can often be more patient too so outpersist people.
 

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I think, for the most part that donkeys are a little bit smarter. Like others have said, more common sense.

@its lbs not miles I think that you meant species.
Donkey's and horses are from the same family of Equidae and same genus Equus. They separate at the species E. ferus (horse) E. africanus (wild asss) and then sub species is the donkey.

You are right about the dog and wolf. They do not separate until sub species. Dog is considered a sub species of wolf.
 

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I raised a donkey from birth, Diddle Eye. He had life off pat.

When we all,went home he would lie down by he fence next to the pub car park and wriggle his way under the wire. He would spend all evening in the pub, getting scratches and pets.

He was a great anti smoker and to save people's lungs he would eat their cigarettes. When the pub closed he would stand outside until one of the locals opened the gate to let him back to where he should be.

That moment loved children and on a Monday, when we had riding for the disabled he would be all around the children and when their bus was leaving he would lie down in front of it so they couldn't go.

It took a lot of pulling and pushing to get him out the way!
 

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The man who replaced our duct work last week commented his dad still has eight horses (brief pause) --- and a mule, lollol

He said the mule is out almost every day, when his dad gets home. - they don't know how it gets out, all the horses are in the pasture.

The mule as far as they know doesn't go anywhere --- it's just standing outside the fence when his dad gets home waiting and letting the man know it can do as it pleases, lollol lol
 

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I think, for the most part that donkeys are a little bit smarter. Like others have said, more common sense.

@its lbs not miles I think that you meant species.
Donkey's and horses are from the same family of Equidae and same genus Equus. They separate at the species E. ferus (horse) E. africanus (wild asss) and then sub species is the donkey.

You are right about the dog and wolf. They do not separate until sub species. Dog is considered a sub species of wolf.
LOL Very true, but I figure it was easier to keep it in simpler (although technically incorrect) terms since most people aren't likely to be as familiar with the evolutionary paths taken (which show that the unicorn is not really a myth....we just messed up on part of it's evolutionary path and know it better as a rhino) :)). We could go into the fact that every species of Equus has a different number of chromosomes (including the truly wild horse as opposed to the feral horses that we call wild and the various specie of zebra each having different numbers so we can't say that all zebras have the same). Or that because of the differences in the number of chromosomes it has been widely (and still is often) believed that cross breeding will not produce viable offspring, but too is not true. They are generally no viable, but there are cases where correct chromosomes line up between the mating of a donkey and horse, producing a fully viable offspring that was capable of being bred and producing offspring.

But technically you are absolutely correct and I should have said the they are a different specie of the Equus genus, of the Equidae family of the Perissodactyla order (which is where the rhinos branched out from).

As for dog and wolf, I've always thought it was ridiculous to even break them down as a subspecies since their chromosome make up is identical. Only real difference is that one is domesticated and the other is not (dogs are just very confused wolves LOL). I'm waiting for someone to decide that each breed of canis lupus familiaris (AKA the domestic dog) is it's own sub specie and we can just stop using the term "breeds".

Now everyone study the Perissodactyla order's (not to be confused with Pterodactyl or Pteropodidae) evolutionary branches for the test on Wednesday. You can hand it a break down on the evolutionary history of order carnivora, family Canidae, genus canis, and explain why the dog was named under the lupus specie and not the rufus specie (which is why think they're going to eventually make each breed of familiaris it's own sub specie) LOL I couldn't resist.

I hope everyone took notes. Make sure you understand the material. It's not as confusing as it sounds (ok, it might be as confusing as it sounds LOL).

Sometimes I think I shouldn't have retired....nah, not really....I never regret it LOL.
 

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LOL Very true, but I figure it was easier to keep it in simpler (although technically incorrect) terms since most people aren't likely to be as familiar with the evolutionary paths taken (which show that the unicorn is not really a myth....we just messed up on part of it's evolutionary path and know it better as a rhino) :)). We could go into the fact that every species of Equus has a different number of chromosomes (including the truly wild horse as opposed to the feral horses that we call wild and the various specie of zebra each having different numbers so we can't say that all zebras have the same). Or that because of the differences in the number of chromosomes it has been widely (and still is often) believed that cross breeding will not produce viable offspring, but too is not true. They are generally no viable, but there are cases where correct chromosomes line up between the mating of a donkey and horse, producing a fully viable offspring that was capable of being bred and producing offspring.

But technically you are absolutely correct and I should have said the they are a different specie of the Equus genus, of the Equidae family of the Perissodactyla order (which is where the rhinos branched out from).

As for dog and wolf, I've always thought it was ridiculous to even break them down as a subspecies since their chromosome make up is identical. Only real difference is that one is domesticated and the other is not (dogs are just very confused wolves LOL). I'm waiting for someone to decide that each breed of canis lupus familiaris (AKA the domestic dog) is it's own sub specie and we can just stop using the term "breeds".

Now everyone study the Perissodactyla order's (not to be confused with Pterodactyl or Pteropodidae) evolutionary branches for the test on Wednesday. You can hand it a break down on the evolutionary history of order carnivora, family Canidae, genus canis, and explain why the dog was named under the lupus specie and not the rufus specie (which is why think they're going to eventually make each breed of familiaris it's own sub specie) LOL I couldn't resist.

I hope everyone took notes. Make sure you understand the material. It's not as confusing as it sounds (ok, it might be as confusing as it sounds LOL).

Sometimes I think I shouldn't have retired....nah, not really....I never regret it LOL.
People do get it confused though.

Like when people are mortified to hear that I give my African Gray parrot a piece of chicken every once in a while thinking that it's cannibalism. I have to explain that it isn't any different than us eating a cow as the closest we are to them is being mammalian.

My retirement can't get here soon enough, lol.
 

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There was a little grey donkey called Sylvie, who chose to lodge in the yard i attended as a child. In theory she belonged to the owners of the yard but I always thought of her as management, while the horses were employees.

She spent her days freely moving around the stables, the edges of nearby fields and admin buildings. She had the common sense to stay close to the complex, despite the yard being open to a side road, which joined a fast moving motorway a few hundred yards away. New people used to give her strange looks as she sauntered past on her way to who knows where.


Definitely more intelligent and a free spirit.
 

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... & pardon going off topic but since you guys started it lbs & Lori, I find it very curious that not one single animal, be it other ungulates or even other equidae, or even wild & feral equus walk on their toenails, have stuff on the bottom of their feet that Dog didn't intend to be in contact with the ground.

And yet there are still vets & farriers who believe domestic horses should be peripherally loaded.
 

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mules and donkeys have a stronger sense of self-preservation and there in lies the term stubborn is a label used on them. They just hesitate doing something that might cause them to get hurt.
 

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People do get it confused though.

Like when people are mortified to hear that I give my African Gray parrot a piece of chicken every once in a while thinking that it's cannibalism. I have to explain that it isn't any different than us eating a cow as the closest we are to them is being mammalian.

My retirement can't get here soon enough, lol.

Dinosaurs had feathers and they ate meat. According to scientists birds evolved from dinosaurs. Chimps hunt and kill other monkeys sometimes and eat them
 

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mules and donkeys have a stronger sense of self-preservation and there in lies the term stubborn is a label used on them. They just hesitate doing something that might cause them to get hurt.
Hmm, I wouldn't say it's anything to do with self preservation or that donks have that 'sense' more than horses at all myself. Horses will *react* in the instant, if they sense... often even hear rumour of - anything to threaten their safety, so you could say they have higher self preservation than a donkey, because donks don't just react first, but they tend to spend a second analysing whether they should run, ignore or be ready to fight/resist whatever the threat is.

And IME, their resistance & 'stubbornness' very often has absolutely nothing to do with perceptions of safety. It's just their 'you & who's army??' attitude to stuff they don't want to do ;-) What's the saying - donkey's MUST be trained the way horses SHOULD be trained.
 

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Hmm, I wouldn't say it's anything to do with self preservation or that donks have that 'sense' more than horses at all myself. Horses will *react* in the instant, if they sense... often even hear rumour of - anything to threaten their safety, so you could say they have higher self preservation than a donkey, because donks don't just react first, but they tend to spend a second analysing whether they should run, ignore or be ready to fight/resist whatever the threat is.

And IME, their resistance & 'stubbornness' very often has absolutely nothing to do with perceptions of safety. It's just their 'you & who's army??' attitude to stuff they don't want to do ;-) What's the saying - donkey's MUST be trained the way horses SHOULD be trained.
So true.

Some people put donks in as protection for other livestock. I've seen horses panic over a lap dog while a donk will square off against a large dog. While the other livestock will run all over the pasture in a panic the donk, realizing it really has no place to run for safety or hide will look at a big dog as if to say, "ok, you have a big mouth full of teeth, but so do I and I have 5 weapons to your 1.....you might bite me, but I'll kill you". What's left of a dog after a good hoof stomping is not a pretty sight.
 

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^Years ago I thought I was going to lose my young puppies, who were playing, oblivious together in the paddock when I brought my donkey home. I let him go & he spotted the dogs & charged!!! :OMG: He was on top of them before they had time to react. Stopped dead with a hoof either side of the terrified babies & looked down as if to say 'Don't forget who's boss here'. You can bet they never grew up thinking it was fun to chase him or horses!
 
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