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White spots on bay colt.

1485 Views 15 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  DollyandAya
Last year I purchased a yearling stud colt. He’s a solid bay out of a black and white spotted stallion and a “red” mare (as the seller listed so could be sorrel or chestnut). He’s never been ridden so the spots can’t be from a saddle issues. Along with never having any form of scalding, rain rot, or other horses biting or chewing on him as he’s stalled 24/7 due to being a stallion. When blanketed last fall he had two white spots show up on his back. About three weeks ago I took it off to groom him and notice the spots had grew in numbers. Once again today I removed the blanket and the other side seems to have obtained four spots along with a spot closer to his tail along with a spot toward the base of his mane. I was wondering if this could be birdcatcher spots or if it’s more so along the lines of lacing.
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Any photos of his head and tail? He looks a LOT like my bay colt when he was turning grey. But to be grey, he would have to have one grey parent. But that's pretty much how my colt started graying out. You could also really see it in his tail and on his face.

If he's not greying out, then I don't know.

PS. Do you know what kind of spotting pattern his sire had? There are some patterns that sort of "roan out" like sabino. But I don't think those spots typically start on the back. But it would be interesting to know what kind of spotting his sire had.
 

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Last year I purchased a yearling stud colt. He’s a solid bay out of a black and white spotted stallion and a “red” mare (as the seller listed so could be sorrel or chestnut). He’s never been ridden so the spots can’t be from a saddle issues. Along with never having any form of scalding, rain rot, or other horses biting or chewing on him as he’s stalled 24/7 due to being a stallion. When blanketed last fall he had two white spots show up on his back. About three weeks ago I took it off to groom him and notice the spots had grew in numbers. Once again today I removed the blanket and the other side seems to have obtained four spots along with a spot closer to his tail along with a spot toward the base of his mane. I was wondering if this could be birdcatcher spots or if it’s more so along the lines of lacing. View attachment 1126734
View attachment 1126733
Just how long is his blanket left on without removal? It could be fungal or lacing beginning. Lacing is progressive and I want to say more common with those that have inherited white patterns. The thinking is it is recessive and not common.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just how long is his blanket left on without removal? It could be fungal or lacing beginning. Lacing is progressive and I want to say more common with those that have inherited white patterns. The thinking is it is recessive and not common.
It’s been removed weekly if not biweekly for grooming, along with the blanket also being washed.
 

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Hi

It's not what you asked, and people hate it when this gets said, but it's not healthy for a horse that age (or any horse, really, but especially a young horse) to be stalled 24/7. He needs to move in order to develop his bones, muscles, and feet.

Better to geld him and let him out.
 

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There are times though when fungal infections cause lacing that can resemble lacing. At his stage it could be either. Lacing is progressive over the life of the horse. Fungal scarring ends when the fungus is eliminated. I should have been more clear. Leaving a blanket on for extended periods could result in fungus.
 

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Last year I purchased a yearling stud colt. He’s a solid bay out of a black and white spotted stallion and a “red” mare (as the seller listed so could be sorrel or chestnut). He’s never been ridden so the spots can’t be from a saddle issues. Along with never having any form of scalding, rain rot, or other horses biting or chewing on him as he’s stalled 24/7 due to being a stallion. When blanketed last fall he had two white spots show up on his back. About three weeks ago I took it off to groom him and notice the spots had grew in numbers. Once again today I removed the blanket and the other side seems to have obtained four spots along with a spot closer to his tail along with a spot toward the base of his mane. I was wondering if this could be birdcatcher spots or if it’s more so along the lines of lacing. View attachment 1126734
View attachment 1126733
Hello, I noticed you posted this a few months ago, however I came across it because I have a bay Arabian and I just posted today about the same thing...did you ever find out exactly what is causing it and has he gotten more?
 

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Well, judging by his head, he's not grey. Other than that, I don't know. 😊
 
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