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i have a 5yo mare (just got her) who has what i think is ring bone. haven't taken her to the vet, but think i have this right.
i've read on the subject but never dealt with it and wanted to know if someone out there has, and if there is something other than surgery that will make her sound. it's on her right hind pastern and causes her to limp.
i think it's something i'll have to live with but would like to ride her if i can get her sound.
who knows what?
 

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i have a 5yo mare (just got her) who has what i think is ring bone. haven't taken her to the vet, but think i have this right.
i've read on the subject but never dealt with it and wanted to know if someone out there has, and if there is something other than surgery that will make her sound. it's on her right hind pastern and causes her to limp.
i think it's something i'll have to live with but would like to ride her if i can get her sound.
who knows what?

Any lameness should be evaluated by your vet and they will be able to give you a prognosis as to whether or not she'll ever be sound enough to ride. Five seems young for ringbone, but I'm sure others will have better information for you on that! Best of luck to you.
 

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What makes you think the lameness is caused by ring bone?

If your horse has been lame with out a real diagnosis for some time I think calling a vet out is the only fair thing to do.
 

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What everyone else said. You need xrays to diagnose the problem and then you can go from there. From what I've read if it is ringbone she won't be sound again and the problem will progressively get worse. Management usually involves correct trimming to make sure that breakover is good and the hoof is balanced, i.e. get rid of long toes/short heels as well as pain management.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i understand what you all say is true. i have been told that supplements can help. that's what i had hoped to find out.
from what i see, i believe she cracked her pastern bone and it's built a calcium deposit, or it's ring bone. i don't believe she'll ever be sound to ride, but like to learn new things. from what i know, i think this happened when she was a two yo.
thanks for the input.
 

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supplements can add vitamins/minerals to help it heal, but its all up to your mare. if its arthritic or joint related talk to your vet about joint supplements, after he diagnoses her.
 

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:-(My mare was just diagnosed with ringbone - NOT what I wanted to hear. I am certainly not an expert, but I have done so much research my head is spinning! I was told ringbone USUALLY affects the front feet - it causes heat and swelling over the foot - x-rays would show if/where any new bone growth had developed - a positive sign of the disease.
Ringbone is the result of some traumatic disturbance to the outer fibrous covering of the bone and that causes new bone growth - it usually developes into osteoarthritis (a severe type of arthritis) of the pastern or coffin joint. My Vet blames my mare's ringbone on poor conformation (PLUS she is a Reiner) -- a base-wide horse -- there is HIGH ringbone - LOW ringbone - ARTICULAR ringbone, or true ringbone and PERIARTICULAR ringbone, or false ringbone. Each type affects a different area/surface in the foot. There are ways to deal with ringbone, but the disease is not reversable. My Vet had my farrier shoe my mare specificaly for ringbone and that did help aleviate some of her pain. My Vet is talking about injecting her pastern joints and putting her on glucosamine/HA injections - she said medications are a first step in dealing with the ringbone. The different types of ringbone respond to different treatment so your Vet would need to do some x-rays and diagnose the specific type of ringbone that your horse is dealing with before any proper and exact treatment could be started. My Vet said surgery is the last option, so we will discuss surgery at a later date. I am hoping that with proper shoes, helpful supplements and medications, my girl will be sound so she can continue to enjoy trail rides. I'll have to see - there are no guarantees with this devistating disease. My Vet doesn't want to rush into anything - she is more consertative, which I like. I am afraid this is going to be a battle for us but I am up for the fight! My mare has never taken a lame step in all her 15 years, until now - I am still in denial and shock! I would suggest talking to your Vet and see if you are dealing with ringbone - I don't know about the hind feet being affected. In all the reading I've done I can't remember any articles about hind feet ringbone - BUT.....I don't know for sure.
I hope you don't have to deal with ringbone - this has been one of the most disheartening situations I've ever had to endure! Wishing you the best of luck and I hope you will get better news from your Vet than I did from mine!
 

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My walking horse had ring bone. We put him on a supplement with glucosomine and because he was older we gave him bute when he was having really bad days. The farrier is your best friend with a horse with ring bone, him keeping the toes short is what kept my horse mobile for his years. It's basically a calsification process. It's very painful as it progresses. I would definitely seek a vet out on this if it's what you think it is. Mine was in the front two feet. His back feet were fine.

I'm actually thinking your horse may have an arthritis issue in the back. I'd have it checked. If you can't afford x-rays they can certainly give you an idea of what "could be" the problem and at least get you pointed in the right direction....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks again.
my farrier trimmed her when she came here as her feet were real bad and she wouldn't let me do it. he said he thought it was ring bone as it appears to come from the joint and grows up the bone. she's had little training and came here in a stock trailer untethered. she won't load into the trailer or stand quietly tied. i would have taken her to my vet before this if she would trailer. all this is training and i got that covered, but it takes time. she showed more problems with the foot after being hauled here than before the trip. i'm sure that that trip has caused her to not want to take another ride or go back into a trailer.
well i'm sure i'm getting another lesson in horse health. the more horses that a person deals with, the more lessons learned.
when i've gotten her to stand quietly tied and to load and stand quietly in the trailer, i'll haul her to my vet and settle the issue of what the problem is. after it has a name, we'll deal with the cure, or not as the situation dictates.
still interested in knowing all i can find about supplements for joint and bone health/healing.
 

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Just food for thought, as it's rare, so I don't mean this as a doomsday prophecy or anything.

Sometimes horses can dislocate the pastern bone below the fetlock.It's called a subluxation, and it may never heal back quite right, and could pop out of place again. Or, it very well could be a simple scar that has really thickened or the ringbone you metioned.

The thing about ringbone, is it can be high or low, or both, and usually is from years of imbalance, whether from compensating for another pain, or from crappy hoof care, or lack of any hoof care. It's also most likely to occur in the front feet, as all hoof pathologies seem to start there. However, it's not impossible for the hinds or even only one side to suffer, but usually, the hinds aren't the first ones to get ringbone.

My thoughts go to perhaps the old calcified fracture, something like a bone spavin in the hock, or the subluxation, which would do something similar, and try to fixate the joint by producing more bone, and creating a visible deformity above the hoof wall.Again, it's not very common, but if she stepped in a gopher hole, or stepped off a trailer wrong, it could have happened. If she's stilll limping, I'd scrape up the money for some x-rays before I committed to owning her. Her usability may be severely limited, even if it is "just" ringbone.

Ringbone is often "osteo arthritis" and is a permanant, though sometimes manageable, condition that tends to worsen. It's arthritis, and requires special care, and she's not going to hold up to heavey work if that is what you had planned. Also, 5 is a bit young to have arthritis, especially if she's that wild, I doubt she's had much of a riding career, so I'm back to thinking it's an old injury.

My last thought would be an old joint puncture and the bones are rubbing on each other after an infection eroded all the soft tissues between them, and agian, her future is going to be limited, most likely.

Really, have the vet to a thorough work up is the best advice I think you could get around here.
 

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thanks amber. (i'm guessing that's you)
since you know as much as you do, i'll give the whole story as i understand it.
i bought this mare as a brood mare on her breeding and confirmation. saw her standing in a lot with other horses for sale. didn't know about the problem then and if i did i don't know for sure if i'd have walked away. gave $500 for her knowing she had stripped her left hind leg from above her hock over half way down the cannon bone. she was tied to a fence as a two yo going into training for the all american. that's the million dollar race for quarter horses. she kicked back through a fence. it ended her race career and i'm pretty sure the ankle on the other side got it's start then. her training stopped there and i've got a 5yo that's halter broke and is a fraidy cat and has a bad foot. i'd start her under saddle if i could fix this up, but not at any cost. as i said, i'd have had her to my vet before now if she'd load. i won't push her as this horse can go from things are ok to OMG instantly. she's done it. i'm not patting myself on the back, but i'm not a bad trainer up to my limits. i trim my own feet and would have done hers(they were way bad, long and multiple long cracks) but she would have none of it even with slow, easy, quiet, trying. called out my farrier and we had to tranquilize her and use a twitch to get the job done and he was stretching his back by the time we were finished.
i have her to breed and until the vet tells me she'll get so bad i have to put her down, i'll keep making those plans. i would like to make things easier for her. i really like her even though she is a kind of a nut. her dad is a TB but her mom is a daughter of rime(son of dash for cash) bred to a daughter of easy jet(who is full sister to easy date who won the all american).
that's how we got here.
going back to your web site now. like to learn new things.
thanks for the good input.
 

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i have a 5yo mare (just got her) who has what i think is ring bone. haven't taken her to the vet, but think i have this right.
i've read on the subject but never dealt with it and wanted to know if someone out there has, and if there is something other than surgery that will make her sound. it's on her right hind pastern and causes her to limp.
i think it's something i'll have to live with but would like to ride her if i can get her sound.
who knows what?
I noticed your location is in SE OK. The best farrier in a multiple state area lives in SE OK. He works closely with veterinarians. He can trim and/or shoe for your mares comfort after a proper diagnosis. If interested, pm me and I'll hook you up.

He's a lameness specialist, with alot of education...very knowledgeable, and very, very good. What he tells you regarding your horses feet, you can take to the bank. He's a MF/CJF. Also has over 25 years of equine pathology under his belt.

I used him when I lived there
 

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Well, Strawboss, I'll have to give up my fancy know-it-all spiel for now and just say that for a brood mare, she's prolly just fine! =) I tend to give long winded replies, heck, you should hear me in person! HA! So, keep us posted on any ideas from the vet, and I'd love to hear what he finds out. (the know it all has to know if she was right or should be duely humbled!).
 
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