The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was horse shopping, at least 5 people who I called, (well my trainer called for me) refused to even let me look at the horse because of my age. They didn't even give me a chance. But I'm 17 years old, very responsible.. And if I can toot my own horn for a second, a darn good rider. I've owned my boy for almost 6 months now, and I'm only ranting because my same situation is happening to a friend of mine. Gosh, makes no sense!
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
Teenagers have a bad reputation as a whole. I'm a teenager myself; I know what adults think of us. :? Irresponsible, immature, reckless, flakey... If you honestly thought that about teenagers, you wouldn't sell to a teenager either if you cared anything about your horse.

Sadly, most horse teenagers I've met ARE irresponsible, immature little scrubs. So it DOES, in my opinion, "make sense."

But extending that generalization to ALL teenagers? No giving us a chance? Is that right? Because some teenagers are great horse people.

I bought two horses as a teenager: one at age 14 (through my parents) and one at age 17 (I pursued solo; paid for her myself and my parents only involvement was to sign some papers). Both owners were hesitant to sell to me, and I know they wouldn't have sold to me if they had not already known me personally.

It's tough, man. But there isn't a thing you or I can do about it. :-(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
I'm guilty of this...I AM a teenager (17, 18 next week) and even I am wary of selling to a teenager. I just sold my filly and had 3 teens call me but I rejected them. I think its mostly because generally teenagers are unable to be financially stable enough to own a horse. This is, of course, not always true. It was true for me though. I thought I was stable enough to buy one horse, then another just sort of 'fell into my lap' but when I lost my job a few months ago, I had a serious problem and ended up having sell both. This happens to many teenagers because we just don't have good enough, or stable enough, jobs. That's not our fault of course, but it does make sellers a little iffy about selling to us because there is a high chance that we won't be able to give a horse a permanent home.

That's why I didn't sell to a teenager anyways. That, and one teenaged girl asked me if my JUST turned two year old TB filly was broke yet and if she was ready for 3' courses...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's why I didn't sell to a teenager anyways. That, and one teenaged girl asked me if my JUST turned two year old TB filly was broke yet and if she was ready for 3' courses...
Well that person is an idiot xD
Posted via Mobile Device
 
  • Like
Reactions: horsedream568

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I get what you guys are saying. It's just frustrating for me. When I was buying, I had parental help, and my trainer backing me up. So most people calmed down once they watched me ride, and heard all the nice things my trainers said about me to the sellers. I was just frustrated by the generalizations they made before even talking to me.
The person who I bought my gelding off of didn't hesitate at all once he watched me ride.
I understand their reasoning, I just think it's unfair to those of us who actually work hard.
Posted via Mobile Device
 
  • Like
Reactions: GoldenGlory

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
I bought my first horse when I was 15, I never had anyone not want to sell to me because of my age. BUT all the local trainers knew me and liked me. They had seen me ride and knew I went to clinics, shows, etc often. I could see where someone not knowing anything about a buyer but their age would turn them down. They're probably thinking that the teenager doesn't have much money or that the horse will be sold when they go off to college. I was fortunate enough to be from a well to do family, and the sellers (mostly local trainers) knew that. They also knew my parents intended to support my horse habit through college. If they had not known me and my circumstances they may not have sold to me, so this is probably what you ran into and what your friend is having to deal with now. I am now in college and I'm very fortunate (and grateful!) that my parents pay for everything. But that is not always the case when kids go off to college. If I was a seller I would be leery to sell to a teenager I didn't know, I wouldn't want my horse sold on within ~2 yrs because the kid went to college. I would be going for the seller who best case scenario would have and support the horse until they're no longer here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I bought my first horse when I was 15, I never had anyone not want to sell to me because of my age. BUT all the local trainers knew me and liked me. They had seen me ride and knew I went to clinics, shows, etc often. I could see where someone not knowing anything about a buyer but their age would turn them down. They're probably thinking that the teenager doesn't have much money or that the horse will be sold when they go off to college. I was fortunate enough to be from a well to do family, and the sellers (mostly local trainers) knew that. They also knew my parents intended to support my horse habit through college. If they had not known me and my circumstances they may not have sold to me, so this is probably what you ran into and what your friend is having to deal with now. I am now in college and I'm very fortunate (and grateful!) that my parents pay for everything. But that is not always the case when kids go off to college. If I was a seller I would be leery to sell to a teenager I didn't know, I wouldn't want my horse sold on within ~2 yrs because the kid went to college. I would be going for the seller who best case scenario would have and support the horse until they're no longer here.
I am in the same boat as you, my parents agreed to pay for my horse, his boarding, and support him through my college years. So he is definitely coming with me wherever I go. I am so blessed to have my mom and dad. And trainers, too knew me. But I bought from out of town, so I can see why they were hesitant. It's just frustrating. I love my horse more than anything. He's staying with me until his last day.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
I would be happy to sell to a young teen/adult if they have the RESOURSES to care/keep a horse:). Many young people do,but unfortunately there are many that don't:-(. I remember what it was like to be that horse crazy teen :wink: they give all the love & attention that would make many a horse happy:D.
I was lucky to have parents that help support my horse habit when I was young:). When I was done schooling I had a good job that would support me to continue having horses:D.
I have a Gelding now that I don't really have for sale,but would sell to right person as he is very leary of people.Right now he figures i'm his soulmate:lol: Flattering yes but, I know He could warm up to others but be one that would pick his person:D I often thought a horse crazy teen might be a good home for him.He has been my boy,trusting & loves attention & if he found that in someone else he'd make them a great horse:).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
What kind of horses are you looking at? I know a lot of people who wont sell green horses to kids or teens because they feel it's irresponsible on their part. Either they don't want the kid / teen getting hurt or they dont want the kid / teen ruining the horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What kind of horses are you looking at? I know a lot of people who wont sell green horses to kids or teens because they feel it's irresponsible on their part. Either they don't want the kid / teen getting hurt or they dont want the kid / teen ruining the horse.
Well when I was horse shopping I wanted an experienced riders only, all around western cow/rodeo/rail/trail horse. And after a ton of looking I got that and more. The point of my post, was just saying that it seems unfair to judge a rider based on age.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
I don't sell horses, but I'd be cautious too. Not saying I'd never sell to a teenager, but I'd want a few questions answered before I feel comfortable.
Riding well is one thing, and is certainly important, but teenagers usually are in a phase of transition that includes major life changes within the next few years. That often includes becoming financially independent of the parents (will there be enough money for the horse?), moving out, major changes in time management (from high school to college / first job), and (especially younger teens) re-focusing their interests from horses to boys.
It is understandable that life happens to everyone, but I'd want to see a reasonably solid plan before putting my horse in a situation like that.
I would also not sell to a teenager without adult (i.e. parent) support. That just sounds too risky.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I don't sell horses, but I'd be cautious too. Not saying I'd never sell to a teenager, but I'd want a few questions answered before I feel comfortable.
Riding well is one thing, and is certainly important, but teenagers usually are in a phase of transition that includes major life changes within the next few years. That often includes becoming financially independent of the parents (will there be enough money for the horse?), moving out, major changes in time management (from high school to college / first job), and (especially younger teens) re-focusing their interests from horses to boys.
It is understandable that life happens to everyone, but I'd want to see a reasonably solid plan before putting my horse in a situation like that.
I would also not sell to a teenager without adult (i.e. parent) support. That just sounds too risky.
Posted via Mobile Device
Yeah, I see what you are saying. I am lucky enough to have parents willing to support my horse obsession through college. So I won't have to let my boy go.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,863 Posts
Teenagers view themselves as adults, but a lot of the rest of the world views them as children. Pretty much all horse owners won't sell to a child - they'll sell to their parents. Which is why for a 16 and under year old the parent should be a major part of the sale process. They should not only come to the viewings, but participate, ask questions, make guarantees, explain their proposed horse care. Show they understand the responsibilities. Once a teenager is older and can drive, work etc, there is no need to share their age so it shouldn't be a problem.

So many teenagers contacted me when my horse was for sale. You could often tell their age by their poor grammar or "text speak". By just polishing up their emails, speaking clearly and concisely on the phone - a lot of owners will still welcome you to view your horse. There is no reason to share your age. If your phone manner isn't great, or you're 14 and under, it's probably best for your parent to call.

Some sellers aren't picky, but I turned away many people who I felt weren't right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,661 Posts
.

Selling a Horse generally involves a contract, many places if not most in the US require you to be 18 or older to enter into a contract.
If they sell to a minor, then that could also open legal problems which could lead to a lawsuit if something happened and the parents wanted to sue.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,141 Posts
What I don't understand is if the TRAINER, who is, presumably an adult, is calling about the horses, why a seller would be hesitant? I would never, ever, even entertain showing my horse to a teen without parents or trainer in tow. Like STG said-a sale is a contract, and legally, you have to be of age to enter into one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,950 Posts
When I was horse shopping, at least 5 people who I called, (well my trainer called for me) refused to even let me look at the horse because of my age. They didn't even give me a chance. But I'm 17 years old, very responsible.. And if I can toot my own horn for a second, a darn good rider. I've owned my boy for almost 6 months now, and I'm only ranting because my same situation is happening to a friend of mine. Gosh, makes no sense!
Posted via Mobile Device
I bought and paid for my first horse when I was 12 --- I am now 66. Even back then, nobody would sell a horse to anyone that was under 18 and still in school:)

I am sorry but, even though you might be more responsible than a whole bunch of folks in their 30's; 40's; 50's; you are still under aged and I wouldn't sell anything to you that cost more than $50 and that would be an inanimate object (meaning no dogs, goats, etc either).

You could come back and look as many times as you wanted, provided you convinced me you had enough money but, when it's all said and done I would have to come face-to-face with your parents or other legal guardian(s) to get their approval.

It's just how the system works:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,800 Posts
the reason why I wouldnt sell to a teenager. They are only years away from going to college, 50% of the horses will be sold...to who? You'll never know.

and does a teenager have all the money needed to properly care for a horse? No, not typically.

Therefore, Id only sell to an experienced, financially stable, forever type of home.

Most teenagers maturity levels arent that of an adult either. Its just proven fact. I was a mature teen, and Im now 25, and have grown in different ways of maturity.

Besides that, a bill of sale would not hold up in court due to the buyer being under-aged. so, no thanks...
Posted via Mobile Device
 
  • Like
Reactions: franknbeans

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,293 Posts
When I bo't my arab, to me the seller appeared to be in her early 20's. About a week after I bo't him she called if I was interested in her saddle? I could come any time after school. OK, thinking she was a teacher. Turned out she meant high school that she was 17. Oh, oh! Her parents who weren't around at the time, called to ask how much I'd paid. They were obviously disappointed but when I asked if they wanted him back they didn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
It's not just horses. I was 19 when I was looking for my first dog, and I ended up getting a dog being rehomed through Craigslist because I was rejected by most of the rescues that I contacted, solely because I was under 21. I don't even really understand that policy myself, but a lot of rescues have it.

I can kind of understand why people are hesitant to sell to younger teens that are still in school. What I don't understand are the people who won't sell to a young person who is financially stable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well it was my parents who were buying the horse, I wasn't turned down because of money
Posted via Mobile Device
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top