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So when I think of warmbloods I think of $$$$ lots and lots of $$$$. What is so special about warmbloods that make them so expensive i guess it could be for any horse really. Breeding and training have to have something to do with price i assume
 

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Warmbloods, I gather, are very popular horses for the showring and are quality, athletic horses although I have never seen or ridden one myself.
 

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I am thinking one of the reasons is because of the testing a warmblood goes through to be approved for breeding & registry. Long process. Also the importing of these horses. But with shipped semen, I don't see that as a main reason anymore. The fees associated with putting a foal on the ground is quite expensive, the stallion's genes don't come cheaply. I have always thought of warmbloods as the high end sporthorse.
 

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So when I think of warmbloods I think of $$$$ lots and lots of $$$$. What is so special about warmbloods that make them so expensive i guess it could be for any horse really. Breeding and training have to have something to do with price i assume

Not only what waresbear has said, but majority of warmbloods have pedigrees that have relatives that have competed at the Olympic or National level, more so than any other type.

They get there because they are bred to compete at this level through testing and approval. The good ones are not just randomly bred from Joe stallion to Molly mare.
 

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Well Sharpie, when I was a kid, I would watch international equestrian events & us poor North Americans didn't stand a chance with our TB's against the Europeans WB's. Then NA equestrian teams started importing the WB's & now we are contenders & winners. Concidence?
 

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Warmbloods, or sport horses are bred for sport, Olympic sport at that.

Considering most apples don't fall too far from the tree this means that breeding stock for Olympic quality sport horses have usually competed at that level themselves. So with all the international travel, international level riders and coaches working with the horse, vet fees, farrier fees and show fees the owners of the Olympic level breeding stock are spending a quarter million a year, at least, on each horse. To make this back, stud fees are a proportional amount and to keep the quality of the offspring high, semen is usually offered only to approved mares... and then the breeder puts another 5 grand per foal into vet work, 300 or so dollars a month to raise the horse to saleable age, training fees ontop of that, etc.... plus not every foal is perfect and there is a death rate!

It's all a trickle down effect to the consumer. You want an Olympic level mount? $40,000 for a "perfect" 4 year old starts to look reasonable once you run the economics...100,000 for a PSG horse, quarter mil for a GP horse... etc....
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Concidence?
Nope, I think not. WBs are bred for a REASON, and they're darn good at what they do. I still like TBs better for all-around horses though. That said, if I thought I was gonna go Grand Prix, I'd probably have to pony up and invest in a WB myself. Good thing that it's not anywhere in my future. :)

There aren't too many Joe Blow WB breeders- WBs are generally bred with some forethought and by people who are more likely to know a thing or two about horses, training, and breeding than the eleventyone QH, TB and grade horse breeders out there who just want a baby out of their mare. (Not to say there aren't wonderful breeders of all breeds, and horrible ones of WB too)
 

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I used to ride and train out of a place that bred & competed Hanoverians. The lady that owned the place did Grand Prix with hers.
After riding them, nothing can even come close to a well trained WB. Strength, grace, stamina. Those horses are bred for the show ring, that's for sure.

I suppose a nicely trained TB or maybe Appendix could come close.. But jumping wise, I doubt it.
 

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Well Sharpie, when I was a kid, I would watch international equestrian events & us poor North Americans didn't stand a chance with our TB's against the Europeans WB's. Then NA equestrian teams started importing the WB's & now we are contenders & winners. Concidence?
Check out the Aussie Olympic eventing teams ;)

We've done very VERY well on good old thoroughbreds, a few of our best Olympic horses have been pulled off the back of a doggers truck.


That said, I am a big warmblood fan, for all of the reasons stated here. I don't necessarily have Olympic aspirations, but as a dressage rider, warmbloods are the way to go. In the jumping and eventing sports, you have a little more leeway with breeds, but dressage is a sport that is quite particular about warmbloods.
I have have thoroughbreds and warmbloods, the thoroughbreds have been 'fun', and I currently have a really super tb sitting in my paddock unfortunately unsound. Tb's like him don't come around too often when you look at the numbers being bred vs the warmbloods.
My yearling hanoverian set me back AU$10k (asking price was $14k) and that was on 'mates rates' as I am local to the stud and know the breeder. The stud fee for his sire is AU$3300, then you have collection fee, shipping costs, vet fees (have to PG mares, scanning to make sure they're ovulating, insemination fees. Then scans during the pregnancy to ensure everything is going well). Then you're feeding the mare and everything else on top of that. The breeder would not have made much profit off of my horse taking all of that into consideration, even with me purchasing him at 7 months.

You then have the performance and stud book testing. Each year the hanoverian society flies someone over from the stud book in Germany to assess out youngstock for potential elite mare status, and acceptance into the stud book. Only the best of the stock is permitted to be branded with the hanoverian 'H' and those stock are then recorded and registered in the stud book. The young stock are also required to be DNA tested before registration.

Breeding QUALITY warmbloods, is an extremely complicated, expensive process. Compared to a lot of the thoroughbreds where any stallion is thrown over any mare and hope for the best. Yes there is a lot of select breeding there to, but far more waste than in the warmblood breeding.
 

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I've seen WB on sale in my area (by the person I know) for $2 or 3K.
 

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I've seen WB on sale in my area (by the person I know) for $2 or 3K.

The ones bred from TOP bloodlines by the farms that know which line goes with which line will cost more.

Just as there are backyard breeders out there, there are also breeders that breed warmbloods (the real kind) to other warmbloods (the real kind) without really knowing which line goes best with another. And while they are true warmbloods many are simply not top quality.

Then we have those that breed the fake warmbloods, calling them warmblood because they bred a "hot" with a "cold".
 

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We've done very VERY well on good old thoroughbreds, a few of our best Olympic horses have been pulled off the back of a doggers truck.
If I was eventing I'd get a TB.

But I do think inspections are the way to go when it comes to judging horses. Bloodlines certainly aren't everything; even two good horses can have a dud foal. Competitions are too subjective; a lot depends on the judge and on what other horses show up on the day. The advantage of inspections is that every horse is judged against the same standard.
 

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I've seen this one wayyy too many times. Someone breeds a Percheron to a Morgan, and suddenly they have a warmblood!
How were warmbloods originally 'created'? By selectively breeding the hotter breeds so you get both athleticism and a quieter nature? I get that you can't just take a hot blood + cold blood = warmblood, but were the colder breeds an influence at any point in time? Or are warmbloods all...hot?
 

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How were warmbloods originally 'created'? By selectively breeding the hotter breeds so you get both athleticism and a quieter nature? I get that you can't just take a hot blood + cold blood = warmblood, but were the colder breeds an influence at any point in time? Or are warmbloods all...hot?

Warmbloods did not come from drafts. They came from the carriage type horse that was usable for both farm and riding...with added selective breeding using one area's (state) foundation mare population with the best suited (or desired stallion) on them.

But to truly understand the warmblood you need to understand that Germany is very much a horse oriented country and the warmblood is not a breed but a breed population defined by the likes and dislikes of that state's administrator's desire to have the best riding horse over the state next to it.
 

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The ones bred from TOP bloodlines by the farms that know which line goes with which line will cost more.
True. The horse I was talking about was registered, but not enthusiastic about jumping/eventing, so the owner wanted to get rid of him. I don't have email with ad anymore to check the lines, but I highly doubt anything spectacular. All I was trying to say is there are cheap ones too out there. Same with, say, qh. The finished reiner or cutter costs lots of money. Which doesn't mean all of them do.
 

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my first horse was a CZ Warmblood. Big, very typical WB look, imported, painfully overpriced, the whole bit.... but my second horse is paint and WB cross and he's my soul mate. I literally bought him out of someone's backyard. So sometimes all the bloodlines, money, and importing in the world doesn't make for a great horse.
 

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I ride a warmblood at the barn occasionally, he's like a well oiled machine that boy....
Oakhill ranch is down the road from me, Richard Freeman breeds Danish Warmbloods and has for years now, and I LOVE to just go sit and watch the trainer works and the Kuering.
 
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