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A few weeks ago I purchased a yearling who had been raised in Texas and brought him to Montana. It has been an unusually cold fall here in the north. This colt has not grown any winter coat at all in the three weeks he has been exposed to our northern climate. It only takes a few days of cool weather and our other horses almost instantaneously hair up. He is turned out 24/7 but is being blanketed at night. I'm trying to acclimate him to our weather in this way but no change since he left TX. Is it possible he just won't grow an adequate hair coat this year?
 

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Welcome to the party!

Congrats on your yearling! He might just need more time to start acclimating. Keep him unblanketed during the day, and be sure to brush after you take the blanket off. You might also consider his dietary needs - if he doesn't have any pre-existing sensitivities, you can give him a little extra carbohydrates. Reason being is this: if he's burning all of his energy (glucose and fat) to exist and keep warm, then there's not much left for him to grow a coat. A horse's skin (which includes coat and hooves) is the last organ that the horse's body cares about because it isn't essential to survival. And you've got a growing boy! Where do you suspect all of his energy goes? *wink wink*

So what are you currently feeding, what breed is your yearling, and how much does he currently weigh? Any idea how big you expect this guy to get, height and weight wise?

One thing you can do immediately is make sure that he has forage (grass hay) available 24/7. I can't really make any other recommendations, at least not specifically, until you answer those questions.
 

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The old rule of thumb I was once told was that if the horse was 'in residence' in the climate by the summer solstice, he'd get a decent coat. I've found that to be true. Every horse I've had from Texas, Arizona, Mississippi, etc. who was here by midsummer looked like a yak by the time winter rolled around. Horses coming in later in the fall usually got less of a coat and had to be stabled/blanketed the first winter on the colder days.
 

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Daylight hours and genetics have more impact on hair growth in winter than the actual temperature.
Your yearling has probably already been programmed for a Texas winter now so you won’t see any real difference until next year.
Leaving his blanket off won’t help, he’s growing so doesn’t need to be burning up all the calories you’re feeding him just to keep warm.
You can leave them off but if he’s losing weight and visibly cold them put them back on.
 
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