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Vet can't be out for a couple days, but I have a mare in foal (due in april) that is out on pasture went to check on her and she is acting really uncordinated (sp) and wobbly. She is having trouble placing her feet and and is tripping a little bit. Other than that she looks great, clean nose, bright eyes, alert, eating, drinking...I am really worried...what could this be?? I don't believe it's founder, just not the right symptoms and her pasture isn't real lush. Any thoughts?
 

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Not sure but could it be Sleeping sickness. EEE. Have you had her vaccinated? You need to get a vet out there to see what it is and to draw blood.
 

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Does she have a fever? Have you checked her heart rate?
 

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Hi, I too vote for getting the vet out NOW! Don't wait, especially as she's in foal. Sounds bad. I don't know about EEE or EPM over here, but other possibilities could be snakebite or other poison, spinal injury, massive magnesium or other nutritional imbalance or deficiency....
 

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Ataxia can also be neurologically related. A vet visit is necessary. Don't forget Wobblers to check for Wobblers syndrome. Good luck.
 

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This is a reason to find a vet that can come out immediately. If the problem is neurological in nature, the faster you start treatment the better the chances of recovery. If it's something else such then you need to know and get it dealt with immediately as well as the only things I can think of right off the bat that would cause a horse to be wobbly that aren't neurological are serious.

You need to have your horse's vaccination records available. Check her temperature twice a day and note any fever as this will help your vet narrow down the possible causes of neurological symptoms. For example, you don't see a fever with wobblers or EPM but you do with EEE, WEE, WNV or neurological disease caused by EHV. Note any differnces in activity or appearance for the last couple of weeks. Make sure your vet knows of any hauling, or new horses on the property that have occured recently. Also consider the diet as a whole---selenium deficiency can lead to neurological deficits and may need to be tested for if you are in an area where the soil is deficient in selenium.
 
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