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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering what you have to deal with when riding a stallion or if you don't ride how do you feel knowing a stallion is around?

For me, sometimes and most of the times riding a stallion can be just as fun and relaxing as any other horse. :grin: I have gone bitless and bridless and felt safer on the boys honestly then my mares. But it depends on the situation and the other horses around. If there are other stallions or mares in heat it can still be fun but I end up being super alert to any changes or signs that my horse may decide to do what he wants. Mares in heat are not so much my worry mine are pretty well behaved and can work next to them without a problem. Working with or around other stallions..not so relaxing. :neutral: Having another stallion riding near you that wants to tear the one you are on apart is not a pleasant feeling.
 

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Ever alert is the name of the game. You have to be very attuned to your stallion's body language. Riding in company, you have to have your radar on. Yes, people should be aware that there is a stallion present and give you appropriate room. But most people are not aware how stallions have a different "space"requirement.
 

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A trainer I work for right now.. when she rides her studs around mares in heat she actually puts a little vicks on their nostrals so they cant smell them... studs arent very fond of it.. but it does keep them calmer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ever alert is the name of the game. You have to be very attuned to your stallion's body language. Riding in company, you have to have your radar on. Yes, people should be aware that there is a stallion present and give you appropriate room. But most people are not aware how stallions have a different "space"requirement.
Very true, I have been sandwiched by 4 mares on my first trail ride with my younger one *after telling everyone to be careful and keep their distance and why :shock:l* he actually didn't mind and went along fine, I was a nervous wreck though:lol:.

@Allison Finch
I have tried that. It did work at first but not for long. Then they recognized the bottle and would know what was coming. :lol:
 

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I've never had a problem riding a stallion around mares, even those in heat.
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I quite often ride with a QH 8yo stallion who is recently broken in, and a well..ahem.. rounded andalusian stallion.

I don't think Duffy quite realises she is a) a horse and b) female. I have no problems with it, I don't ride up next to them, that'd be rude.

I have more issues with the 3yo being broken in like a nutter and it gallops around the school- I refuse to ride with that horse in there. I think training of the horse takes a lot in to consideration too, and the other riders.
 

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I suspect some people don't realize how hormonal driven a stallion can be. We hear stories of how gentle and calm some is but there are many stories out there where people have been killed or crippled because a calm stallion suddenly turned on someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
SEAmom, what breed and age are the horses you ride? It is nice to hear that :)

DuffyDuck, Nice. Well that is ok. Clyde is more confused about other horses, he knows he what he is...others he always hopes are female. :p There is one horse I do not like riding around because the rider think it is funny that his horse is pawing out and rearing...at us. T-T Thank goodness they are far far away now.

Saddlebag, I have heard stories too that have made me think. I'm glad I'm still alive. I have had my share of close encounters with all my horses. I trust them a lot but I do tend to be safe. I mean, I wouldn't try to cuddle my horse who was all geared up to breed or battle, that would be asking for a paw in the chest.
 

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I've ridden an english pleasure pb arab stallion (a friend's horse) in the arena (show and at home) and on trails for the past 3 years. I started riding him when he was 10. He absolutely knows what he has to offer, but he absolutely knows the boundaries. I've trail ridden him with mares and heat and he couldnt care less. To be honest, I worry more about warming him up, getting those kinks out and staying on during it than him being stud-y while I'm riding him. He's been ridden by my daughter when she was 4-6 years old. He was shown by a girl when she was 9-14 years old and placed well with him at shows.

I also was a groom in high school and there was a pb arab stallion there for wp showing/training and he was perfectly well-mannered at every moment. Again, he knew what he was about and seemed to thoroughly enjoy his "fun times", but he never took a misstep. He was one of my favorite horses ever.

That same barn did have a stallion who was crazy, but he was only taken out to breed. Not groomed, no turnout, and you could tell the difference. I have no idea what would have happened if anyone ride him around mares, to be honest.
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
SEAmom, I have met a lot of stallions but they have been of the same breed. I met a few stallions that were quarter horses. They seemed ok . I have met some pure arabian stallions and they seem the most calm in fact I couldn't believe they were stallions. As for the native breed, you will have no doubt that they are. They are pretty aggressive in comparison to the arabians but it is just my opinion as I have only seen a few coming from different breeds. Also 10 is a nice age.
 

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I'm not sure what you mean by the native breed. Could you clarify?
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Ah, sorry. I'm from the Philippines. They seem to have these ponies here but don't have a particular name for the breed...at least not that I know of. Sometimes they just call them pinoy or visayan locally. They could be brought over from the spanish...maybe some from the Americans. I know some are imported from Australia.

So I am really not sure what to make of it. The native horses remind me a lot of the Mongolian Pony. Short necks very small usually no more than 13hh.. very narrow but super strong and sturdy/hardy. They come in a huge variety of colors but they have the same characteristic build.
Here is my album.
Pictrues of Horses pictures by cintillate - Photobucket
Not all these horses are mine. The last one I was told is Thoroughbred, he was big but the neck and other features made me thing he has native in him. I also have one of me next to my tiny stallion just so you get a sense of how small he is. I'm 5'6

These are my 3
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff457/cintillate/Pictrues of Horses/DSC01275.jpg
The 2 on the outside are native horses. The one in the middle is a Quarab with a bit of native.

But if you type it in google you don't get much. If you type Philippine horse you'll get them and mostly pictures of horse fights. They use the native one for horse fights, I wouldn't dream of putting mine in one and pretty sure it is illegal but who knows may be after years of being bred to fight that could explain their aggressiveness.

Here are some carrying riders
Horse Back Riding Moalboal Cebu Philippines

if you read they just refer to them as "our native horses"

So, I hope that helps. :D
 

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They are pretty horses! I definitely see the short neck, but I think they are gorgeous! I had no idea that there was a native breed of any type in the Phillipines. Thank you for sharing all of that information and the pictures. It is unfortunate that they are used for fighting. One could be indicative of the other. If they are a naturally aggressive breed, it is unfortunate that it is exploited like that if that is the case. Of course, any fighting is sad.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
They are pretty horses! I definitely see the short neck, but I think they are gorgeous! I had no idea that there was a native breed of any type in the Phillipines. Thank you for sharing all of that information and the pictures. It is unfortunate that they are used for fighting. One could be indicative of the other. If they are a naturally aggressive breed, it is unfortunate that it is exploited like that if that is the case. Of course, any fighting is sad.
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No problem, I love these little guys. Yes, it is sad to hear that they are used for fighting. A plus side to their being aggressive and not having natural predators here is that they are not flighty/spooky or high strung and can be very laid back. Downside establishing respect with them is a challenge. :wink:
 

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My stallion is the best behaved horse in my barn. I don't have to worry about much with him when I'm on him or have him on the lead. He sometimes gets a little studdy when he's out in the pasture or in his stall and a mare gets too close. But he knows who's boss and is nothing but respectful to his rider and everyone around when he's tacked up or on the lead.

We've put sooooo much work into him though. And it is never ending. He needs constant training so he doesn't forget. But he's truly a good boy, and very well tempered. He gets embarrassed when he gets in trouble, so he avoids it at all costs.
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He gets embarrassed when he gets in trouble, so he avoids it at all costs.
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I had to chuckle at this, I told someone that my stallion was embarassed because I got after him and they told me I was 'Nuckin' Futz'. They were not horse folks. But I totally know what you mean, it's that head duck, lip lick, sideways, "AW SHUCKS" look they give you when you've had to correct them.

I have friends who will not ride with me if I'm riding my stallion. They refuse to go on any ride with a stallion, if they know there's a stallion ahead of time. I've learned to enjoy riding by myself because of them. I just refuse to let other people dictate who I'll ride or not, when my stallion is trained to within an inch of his life. I always ride drag so that I can see what he's thinking about before he thinks it, I'm always ready to kick his rear if he needs it for getting studly under saddle and would NEVER allow him to get close enough to a mare to cause trouble. If 2 stallions show up on a ride, I'll ride the opposite end of the ride from the other stallion, just to make sure the peace is kept. I know I sure as H*LL don't want to be on board during a stallion fight or when old Romeo decides to grace some girl with his manly presence!

Unfortunately, many people don't keep their stallions in line or train them to behave. They just say, "Well, he's a stallion", like that excuses anything. I want my stallion to think he's a gelding unless it's breeding season and he's in his special halter on a date with a mare. Otherwise, no talking, screaming or squealing, no striking, no bowing up, none of that is tolerated.
 

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My stallion is one loud mouthed boy! But again, never under saddle or on the lead. If I hear even the slightest squeak out of him he gets corrected.

And I totally understand what you mean about people allowing stallions to be disrespectful "because he's a stallion." Its frustrating. I think far too many people pass judgment based soley on the word "stallion." Because an intact male horse should be allowed to act differently then any other horse?

My husband thought a stallion was a breed of crazy horses. This was of course many years ago, and long before we ever owned one ourselves. But he said the its the media that puts these images in people heads. There are so many movies with crazy stallions in them, that it creates a bias.


Tell your friends to be a little open minded. If not for stallions there would be no horses.
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My stallion is one loud mouthed boy! But again, never under saddle or on the lead. If I hear even the slightest squeak out of him he gets corrected.

........

Tell your friends to be a little open minded. If not for stallions there would be no horses.
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My boys all know what, "NO TALKING" means. From the time they're little, if they make a sound while being led somewhere or screaming at a mare in their stalls, they get shanked hard and told, "NO TALKING". By the time they're full grown they are very quiet. Out in their stallion yard they can talk all they want but on the lead or under saddle, or basically if I'm around, they better hush.

As for the friends, I've learned that the sound of a mind slamming shut is pretty final. I don't fight them. If I want to ride one of the boys I don't go with them. If they call up to see if I want to go on a ride, I take my 'go to' mare and go with them. If we run into each other and I'm on one of the boys, I just step aside and let them pass. It's funny, their MARES are the ones who make a scene, my boy will stand and just graze as they go by. You should see them trying to handle their squatting, squealing mares......it's pretty dang funny. :D
 

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Sarah, do you think it's a case of being close minded, or mindful of one's own safety?

I've ridden my lovely mare with several stallions over the years, and they were gentlemen, but the riders were very experienced and watchful. I have had the unfortunate experience of riding with one stallion and rider that were not. Made for a very tense ride. I have never ridden with that particular stallion since.
 

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Futurity colts come the trainer intact, in the beginning it can be a little chaotic dealing with them. Especialing when you end up with several at a time. It doesn't take long before everyone settles into the training program and everyone is taught that they are not allowed to talk or be rude. I found it to be more a personality trait as far which ones are very obedient and want to please and those who are a pain and can't help to hollar at a horse at the other end of the arena even though he knows he will be corrected.

But no matter what stallions are stallions and horses are horses - saftey is priority for yourself and others around you.
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