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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all!

I am trying to put together a worming schedule for my girls. I live in the Midwest US, and I wanted to know... should I do anything different? Is there different parasites here that I should be looking out for? I've not cared for horses in the Midwest, only the West and the South. It might be a dumb question, but I just want to do right by my horses.

Their last worming was 3/31 with Fenbendazol. I was going to hit 'em with Ivermectin at the end of the month, then Pyrantel at the end of July. Starting the cycle over at the end of September with Fenbendazol.

How do you guys do your worming? Thanks in advance for any help! (or pointing me in the right direction)
 

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I don't do this because my guys are boarded and the barn owner worms (or at least she used to, long story) but I believe the current best practice would be to get a fecal egg count and then figure out what to worm with or if they even needed worming. Some don't.
 

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I don't do rotational. Fecal egg counts are the better way to go about it than randomly hitting them with something they might not need.


You need to worm for tapes and bots, otherwise just what you see on the counts. My vet has said my horse only needs 1x a year with rechecks in between.
 

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Fecal counts are good; we do fecal counts. Most people (for most horses) either worm as needed, once a year, or twice a year. The Midwest shouldn't be any different.
 
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I'm from the midwest. Our humidity level keeps the worm eggs viable even during high heat. I no longer use fenbendazole as the resistance has built up against it here. I don't know the ages of your horses, but roundworms and strongyles have become a problem in young horses until they build up some natural immunity. My youngsters are kept on a tighter worming schedule until they reach the age of 2. My older horses get wormed fall and spring for bots and tapes. I use ivermectin and moxidectin. I suggest working with your vet with fecals to get an idea of your worm load and identify any high shedders. I had one high shedder in a herd of 10 that needed special attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh wow, thank you all for the help!! I was stuck in the past with rotationals, it would seem!

I'll do that, I have the vet coming out to essentially get a base-line on the girls for me (they're 23 and 24 years old by the way! I saw the question asked!) so I will go ahead and get him to do fecals too. How often do you guys get fecals done? Every 2 months?

Thank you all again so much for the help! I am really glad I asked (especially since I asked before I've had the vet out to do their initial check in stuff!)
 

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I only get fecals once a year. My herd seems to do pretty well with the twice yearly worming. As my high shedder aged combined with the program I kept him on, he is no longer considered a high shedder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I only get fecals once a year. My herd seems to do pretty well with the twice yearly worming. As my high shedder aged combined with the program I kept him on, he is no longer considered a high shedder.
Do you think with my girls being in a boarding facility where they will surely swap turnout pastures that they'd need more fecals than just yearly? I'm excited to speak with my vet about this, I'd much rather worm effectively, not just all scatter-shot.
 

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Do you think with my girls being in a boarding facility where they will surely swap turnout pastures that they'd need more fecals than just yearly? I'm excited to speak with my vet about this, I'd much rather worm effectively, not just all scatter-shot.
A lot of it depends on manure removal and the worm load of the other horses at your barn. All of mine are at home, and I have complete control of the deworming. If your BO has their own routine, you may just be stuck with that. If not, then your vet may recommend more fecals.
 

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Yes for fecal counts but the worst worms - tapeworm and encysted strongyles - don't show up in fecal counts and they both need a specific active ingredient to clear them - the most effective now are moxidectin and praziquantel respectively.
Just because a horse isn't a high shedder doesn't mean it isn't full of worms - they just aren't producing eggs.
There's a high resistance now to ivermectin and fenbendazole due to past over use
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A lot of it depends on manure removal and the worm load of the other horses at your barn. All of mine are at home, and I have complete control of the deworming. If your BO has their own routine, you may just be stuck with that. If not, then your vet may recommend more fecals.
Yeah unfortunately it isn't just the barn owner. They have 4 horses of their own, then there are... 6 other horses owned by individuals, and the barn isn't responsible for worming the horses. So it's really up to the boarders (which like, I don't know if or how the others worm. 3 of the horses are owned by people under 18 and I do not see parental involvement other than dropping them off so I am unsure how those horses are done)

So yeah it may be better to do more fecals then. I'll ask my vet when they come out what their thoughts are, I really wish I had mine at home. Soon, hopefully. I like having more control over care, having horses at home. But... city life :( One day I'll move out of this apartment, haha! Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes for fecal counts but the worst worms - tapeworm and encysted strongyles - don't show up in fecal counts and they both need a specific active ingredient to clear them - the most effective now are moxidectin and praziquantel respectively.
Just because a horse isn't a high shedder doesn't mean it isn't full of worms - they just aren't producing eggs.
There's a high resistance now to ivermectin and fenbendazole due to past over use
Man, that's a shame about Ivermectin and Fenbendazole. It makes sense, because those were two of the most commonly used during my time in CA. I've known owners in the past who only wormed with Ivermectin (because of the price) and never rotated. Good to know about the tapeworm/strongyles, it's another thing I'll add to the list to ask the vet! Thank you again!
 

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Egg counts are great, but some worms don't show up on them. I do one about once a year, but have also had horses who showed low worm load, but just 'weren't doing right' and perked up considerably after a deworming.
 

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Yes, do a fecal count. Haven't had to worm in 4 years. Have excellent manure control. Your vet will let you know how the count looks, how often it should be done and what wormer you need for your area.
 

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I agree with talking to your vet, they will work with your specific needs as well as update you on any health care you may be unaware of in that area. And yes, fecals first is standard (better really) practice as an in general.
 

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Man, that's a shame about Ivermectin and Fenbendazole. It makes sense, because those were two of the most commonly used during my time in CA. I've known owners in the past who only wormed with Ivermectin (because of the price) and never rotated. Good to know about the tapeworm/strongyles, it's another thing I'll add to the list to ask the vet! Thank you again!
I have sheep as well and both sheep and goats have worms showing resistance to the point of being life threatening (or fatal). It's pretty scary. Horses are nowhere near as bad but they're heading in the same direction. I hope the awareness isn't too little too late as it has been with other species. FWIW we did almost lose a goat many years ago to worms (right after she kidded and her immune system was run down, it wasn't an acute attack or anything special), after trying many things we gave her chewing tobacco and it worked... Filed that away lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just as an update!

I got lucky with my vet, he is actually the vet that they've had for the last 10 years (he serviced the broodmares at the university) and he knows them very well. He said that he could do a fecal if I wanted to, but, they (and the others) were recently tested and there were no big issues. He recommended keeping them on a rotation 4x per year. They had Fenbendazole, their next will by Pyrantel, then in the fall he said that this area is notorious for tapeworms so he wanted them to get Quest (Moxidectin) specifically to treat against that (honestly I think that's what he said, it was a few days ago and I am very sun faded right now from working in the heat/humidity today) then Ivermectin. Then we do it all over again. I asked if he felt I should do a fecal each rotation and he said that I wouldn't need to, and wouldn't do it for his own horses, but he would do it if I requested it.

So yeah! I asked a boat load of questions and even remembered to ask the worming question lol!
 
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Good glad you found a good vet that knows the horses!! That said, I would recommend a fecal going into it, it doesn't matter that the others are clean because yours are new to this routine.

I'm also a little confused by the rotation that doesn't quite make sense or match up, but maybe you're just not remembering right lol.

I wouldn't do a fecal everytime unless you're concerned, it won't hurt but is likely overkill. I usually do once a year in the spring.
 
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