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I recently was given a very beautiful and healthy 14 year old TB mare(That, may I add, I have quickly fallen in love with :D)

When she was at her old home, she was on grass 24/7 and wasn't being given food. So when she went to the barn that I ride at to be refreshed, she was put on 1/4 of sweet feed and slowly moved up to 1/2 scoop senior feed. She also had hay when she was in her stall, but she didn't get grass when she was out because the round pen she went out in didn't have any grass in it, so she got hay then too. Now that she is home with me, she was slowly bumped up to 3/4 senior feed to help her put on weight.

I started noticing that her poop wasn't as solid as it was, and she was peeing a lot, but it was rare when I saw her drinking. I thought it was just her getting used to the different senior feed (She gets Nutrena safe choice senior feed). Well, several weeks later and no change. She is on the same water as the barn is, so I don't know what could be doing it other than the feed. My older mare is on the same feed and she is fine.

My other two mares are not in the same fields because one can have hay but the other two can't, so they are separated. I am trying to come up with a way to keep them together (one being separating them while my TB eats hay and letting them together afterwards)


I apologize for this being soo long but I an trying to type every detail I can think of, because goodness knows what it could be, or if I even should be worried about it. Thx if you read through this far :loveshower:
 

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Being on grass 24/7 is the ideal food! Why are you worried about the horse, because she is peeing lots and not drinking water? If that is the case, it sounds like a health issue, call a vet maybe?
 
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I am worried because her poop hasn't been solid for a couple weeks, and I don't see her drink. She does drink after I ride and I make her drink, but I haven't seen her drink by herself :/

I mean, she is still acting fine. I guess I am just being a worrying horse mum haha!
 

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I was under the impression that grass 24/7 could cause foundering and laminitis (spelling?). I am pretty new to this, but it was something about grass storing tons of sugar when not "growing" under light or if brown and dry.
 

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Grass is a horse's natural food, but lush pasture 24/7 for a horse certainly could cause that. Most areas don't have lush pasture like that unless it's spring.
 

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Since you brought her home does she have pasture again? Green grass can cause loose stools and the moisture in the grass provides them with a lot of the water they need. It's been raining so much in my area that my horses aren't drinking out of their tank near as much as they do during dryer weather. If you're concerned you can make sure she's hydrated by doing a pinch test. I usually do it on their neck, right in front of the shoulder, because it's easier to get ahold of some skin there. Anyway you pinch and pull up on the skin for a few seconds. Let go and if the skin immediately goes back into place she's fine. If the skin stays tented up for any length of time then she's dehydrated.
 

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That's also what I was wondering...I got a little lost in the description.

If I understand right, she was somewhere turned out on pasture with no hay or grain.
Then you brought her to a barn for training and she was started on a little senior feed but was in a dry lot and only given hay, and she lost weight (probably wasn't getting enough hay is my guess).
Now you have her at home, and she is back in a field with grass but also has added hay and senior feed to help her gain weight.

You don't mention what type of hay you have. It's possible that it has higher protein than she was used to, and horses urinate out excess protein. A food that is richer than the horse is used to will also make the stools more runny for awhile until they adapt. So all of that would be normal with feed changes.

If the horse has access to a trough with fresh water all the time, you don't have to worry about them drinking normally. I rarely see my own horses drink, but they have access to water at all times so I don't worry about it. Unless the horse is sick or appearing dehydrated, then you may need to have the vet out.
 

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So, not sure how often you think a horse drinks...not every hour like a human does.
Horses do a deep quenching watering usually twice a day with a few smaller mouth wettings as I call them a day.
You might not see the horse actually drinking deeply....
If the manure is moist as you want it to be, not runny poop but not hard dried balls either....the horse is drinking adequate amounts of liquid.
Depending upon how much feed you are feeding, how soon you made manufacturing change-over and adjustments and how mush you just increased it again I might not be so concerned.
Some horses take time to acclimate their gut to a new recipe fed.
And you have again changed diet with now again being back on a pasture environment.
Do indeed do the pinch test for dehydration. If not dehydrated slow down what you keep introducing to the horse and let her get used to what it is you have changed on her diet....
Some horses also don't do well on certain brands of feed....just the way it is.

I would also be doing a poop test and checking for sand in the gut with the things you write of...
Testing Your Horse for sand in its stomach
Sand accumulation can do exactly what you describe...

Good luck.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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I am worried because her poop hasn't been solid for a couple weeks, and I don't see her drink. She does drink after I ride and I make her drink, but I haven't seen her drink by herself :/

I mean, she is still acting fine. I guess I am just being a worrying horse mum haha!
"You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink"

If she is drinking when you offer then she is drinking on her own. She is fine.

How long have you had her? She went from grass and hay to two? different types of feeds (What is the amount in lbs/qts?) and hay and no grass. How long was this transition? I don't find that surprising at all. Loose manure is not uncommon. Her diet changed dramatically and she also is in a new barn (times two!) with new friends. All very very stressful.

I would give her a short course of ulcergard but otherwise just monitor and try to keep any additional changes to a minimum or at least over a period of time. I wouldn't be too worried. You can always add water to her feed, it won't hurt anything and will at least make you feel better.

Do a pinch test to check for hydration but it's not like she forgets the bucket is there when you don't put her in front of it.

I'd be surprised if she didn't have a little upset after all that excitement!

Why can't the others have hay? Just make sure she still has friends around even if she can't be in with them.
 

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Do they?? Another thing I'm more horse-like on then!
No, they don't....
I will rephrase and clarify that....
No, my horses do not drink every hour of every day.
They appear to drink 2x a day deeply...then they may go occasionally to moisten, wet their mouth but that is it... a quick sip and off they go.
Just what I have observed in my yard.
:runninghorse2:....
 

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No, they don't....
I will rephrase and clarify that....
No, my horses do not drink every hour of every day.
Exactly, but what you said was humans do ~ but I don't. ;-)
 

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:oops: :redface: :oops: ....
You're right.
I did say it ....
My bad!

I don't know how people drink so much some of them...
I would spend to much time in the bathroom from floating...:icon_rolleyes:
And I have better things to do with my time & life... :riding: :cowboy:
:runninghorse2:...
 

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When I first bought my horse he was on a similar situation to yours. 24/7 pasture, and then when he came with me he was stalled and pasture part of the day (not usually a lot of grass). He had a lot of digestive issues adjusting to the change and I worked closely with my vet. We did a 30 day omeprazole treatment for ulcers and I continued him on a probiotic and electrolytes in his grain (which was also a senior feed). He was on grass hay free choice with 1-2 flakes of alfalfa each day. I also did a sand clear treatment and he was fecal tested and dewormed accordingly. Bloodwork was totally normal and we did his teeth twice in the span of 6 months. Eventually after a few months he adjusted to the change but it was definitely a challenge to get him to firm up his stools. The only extra thing I could have done was scope him but I wasn't going to dish out a ton of money on a diagnostic that might not tell me anything when he was essentially healthy otherwise (great energy, a joy to ride, playful in the pastures, and friendly with everyone). I think it was just a huge adjustment to him from one diet to the other, and after almost 7 years of ownership he is absolutely terrible with any type of change. If the weather changes drastically he has diarrhea, or if his routine is suddenly off (like we can't go outside for a day or something) he will have diarrhea. I've just learned to combat it with probiotics and electrolytes.
 

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"You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink"

If she is drinking when you offer then she is drinking on her own. She is fine.

How long have you had her? She went from grass and hay to two? different types of feeds (What is the amount in lbs/qts?) and hay and no grass. How long was this transition? I don't find that surprising at all. Loose manure is not uncommon. Her diet changed dramatically and she also is in a new barn (times two!) with new friends. All very very stressful.

I would give her a short course of ulcergard but otherwise just monitor and try to keep any additional changes to a minimum or at least over a period of time. I wouldn't be too worried. You can always add water to her feed, it won't hurt anything and will at least make you feel better.

Do a pinch test to check for hydration but it's not like she forgets the bucket is there when you don't put her in front of it.

I'd be surprised if she didn't have a little upset after all that excitement!

Why can't the others have hay? Just make sure she still has friends around even if she can't be in with them.
I have had her since the beginning of April, and I use a 3 qt scoop so she gets whatever 3 quarters of that is, haha!

The others can't have hay because one is allergic to it. She almost died the last time we gave it to her.

She also gets extremely worked up when we take the other one away from her, so it is just easier to keep them together and separated from Nina. (Sorry if this is hard to follow :/)

Their fields are right next to eachother, so they constantly touch noses over the fence and play together, even if they are separated :D
 

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^That's very interesting but what happened you gave her hay once and she got sick? Hay is the staple of a horses diet. In the rare situation a horse actually can't have hay (typically an older horse with no teeth) you need to make sure to not only balance the diet appropriately but to feed much more frequently to try to "recreate" the effects of feeding hay, and that's still far from ideal. Even with out old gelding who was on a "mush" diet he still got a little hay to keep him happy (he had enough teeth he could chew without danger of choking but it was no longer appropriate as the main diet).

Also, you can't be allergic to hay, that doesn't make sense. You can absolutely be allergic to something IN the hay. I also know horses allergic to a certain type of hay, say alfalfa or timothy but those allergies are rarely severe to the extent you're describing. Have you pinpointed what exactly she was allergic to? I'd be shocked if it was something that's in every single type of hay to the point she can't have hay and is actually "allergic to hay". I'm hoping she's on hay replacer at the very least?

I know it's completely O/T but you're not feeding two horses something that they need because one was sick once in the past and the other you don't want to separate even for feeding. Just feel like there should be an easier way around that... I can imagine that was a scary situation so am not trying to give you a hard time. Just think about it!

How is the new horse doing at this point?
 

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Also, you can't be allergic to hay, that doesn't make sense. You can absolutely be allergic to something IN the hay. I also know horses allergic to a certain type of hay, say alfalfa or timothy but those allergies are rarely severe to the extent you're describing. Have you pinpointed what exactly she was allergic to?
I'm curious about this too. What does the horse eat?
It sounds like the horse is outside...so is the horse on pasture? If the horse is on pasture, then the horse is not allergic to hay made from any of the varieties of grass that are growing in the pasture, at least.
 

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I worked at a racehorse stables where one of the horses was supposedly allergic to hay. So he had to be fed chaff & grain only.... & turned out to grass far more than the others did. I was a teenager at the time, so that didn't strike me as incongruous then. I wonder if it was about dust/mould spores in hay...
 

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I'm curious about this too. What does the horse eat?
It sounds like the horse is outside...so is the horse on pasture? If the horse is on pasture, then the horse is not allergic to hay made from any of the varieties of grass that are growing in the pasture, at least.
I imagine the horse is sensitized to dust or mold in the hay.Once sensitized, it takes very little to have a reaction.
These horses then do best on pasture, if available, or need all hay watered, and kept turned out as much as possible. COPD (heaves)
 
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