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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before I go any further, I need to say that Pony's saddle does fit -- I had two saddle fitters evaluate it, and it's also the one that I posted here and everyone said it fit.

That said, it does still slide forward from time to time. It has always done this. I think part of it is the nature of his conformation -- short flat back, no withers, wide wide wide, forward girth groove, and fat.

In the process of getting him fitted for his harness, the lady suggested that I buy this funky sort of girth to make the saddle (of the harness) sit right. I asked her if she knew of something similar for an English saddle, and she sent this link:


I would totally be on board with buying this if I thought it would solve the problem of the saddle slipping forward. From the pictures it seems like it might -- I can see how it would fix the angle of the billet straps (due to his girth groove they always end up sort of diagonal). And surely the angled billet straps are part of what is pulling the saddle forward, right? I'm hesitant to order because of the price. If it would work, it would totally be worth it to me. And... I do think his saddle sits right on the border of where his shoulder is, and this is supposed to fix that.

I need to add that even bareback, at the canter, I find myself pushed forward onto his withers. So I think part of it may be his short back and way of moving, which I suppose no girth could fix.

What do you guys think?
 

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They're not cheap...
Around since 2017, maybe sooner...
Seem to be reviews on it in several publications..
Not the first company to make a ergo girth
Do you think this is going to fix your issue or is it a combination of build and movement along with his weight that shifts your saddle?
I don't know...truly.
The fact that you riding bareback are shifted forward...

I heard nothing negative in reviews which honestly makes me suspect...no negative from anyone :unsure:
Those who sing the praises are paid endorsers of many products...how they get paid a living wage for sponsoring products..
Depending upon the material constructed from as little as $90 to $259.00...its only your money to separate you from.
Quite the marketing and advertising program they have...
馃惔...
 

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It might reduce the slipping forward, but only if the saddle is fitted level to begin with. My experience is it's not often a forward girth strap angle which causes a saddle to slide onto the back of the shoulder, but the horse's conformation, both of the back and the brisket. So you'd have to watch that the forward-cranked section doesn't interfere with the back of the horses's forearms ie.that if the girth still slides forward the central section is not too wide. Fairfax/Prolite overcome this by having 'standard' and 'narrow' fittings depending on the gap between the horse's front legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@unclearthur thank you for responding -- I was hoping you would.

I need to research what you said about the gap between their legs. I have just about used my quotient of brain power for the day on work, and still have a few more hours to go. That's kind of making my brain spin around in circles right now.
 
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I got one of these girths for Christmas on the advice of another TWH rider. My mare is A framed. Narrow shoulders but a wide back and a forward girth groove. I have only used it a couple of times - my issue is not saddle slippage but girth galls as my mares girth groove is very forward. The girth is well made and I like it. BUT I am not sure why it would work on a mutton withered horse. In my experience very few girths stop a saddle from moving on a mutton withered horse - the reason is that the saddle tree does not fit around the rib cage and the shoulder but rather sits on top of it. Nothing is going to change that.
 

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@ACinATX I feel ya! I know about the round, mutton withered shirt-backed types. I鈥檝e got one too. Even with proper fitted saddles, sometimes you get some slipping. Although for me, it鈥檚 because Mitch doesn鈥檛 like a tight cinch or girth so I always ride a hole looser than I probably should and make sure I use a breastcollar and crupper if necessary (looking into saddle breeching too, which is nothing new to him as a driving horse). Good thing I鈥檝e got good balance

Have you thought about trying an endurance girth? They鈥檙e sort of like ropers with that wider middle, but have buckles for english billets. I鈥檝e got one for my dressage saddle and one for my treeless. They鈥檙e a little less expensive than the Total Fit girths.
 

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What are you using for a saddle pad? I use a Skito pad with my treeless saddle because they tend to move around more. I also have a couple of saddle pads with a rubberized texture that helped keep my old Australian saddle in place. I don't have the saddle anymore, but I kept the pads because they worked so well.
 

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My wife uses one of these girths with her Australian saddle. She bought it to prevent chaffing and galling in her horse's "armpits." It worked. As far as preventing a saddle from slipping forward, I noticed the manufacturer makes no such claim, which you tell you something. My first Arabian mare was shaped like Pony, round back, no withers. Basically, her middle looked like an upside down pear. I never found anything to work. The only thing that might work is a saddle designed for mules. Good luck.
 

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The total fits are huge. Wide and heavy. While it works for what we bought it for it only looks in proportion on my draft.
 

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I've used an anatomical girth but found that what worked much better was having a very flat, mohair girth and also using a shorter girth with longer billets. If your saddle has short billets, you can actually use a billet extender to bring them down lower. This is something they do on treeless saddles, to help stabilize them more. The most stable position for a girth is just above the horse's elbow. Then if the girth is very flat, it is also stabilizing.

Ideally, your billets come out near the front of the saddle, because if you have far back billets it is even more difficult to keep the saddle from moving forward. It goes without saying that you want to use the girth on the front two if there are three billets.


This type of billet setup is very helpful for horses with round backs, low withers, and forward girth groove. Something to consider when looking for your next saddle.


My final setup for my very round horse that had saddle slipping issues was a very wide tree with flat panels, so the saddle sat low on the horse, forward, long billets, and a very flat, short girth. This fixed my saddle from slipping. It took years to get to this solution for me.
 

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My pony has the same problem with the saddle slipping forward, but his is mainly because he is very downhill built. I have tried the total saddle fit shoulder relief girths, both english and western, on him and they do not work. They actually made it almost worse. The curve just made it slide up against his "armpits" and in between his legs underneath. He was not happy. I also tried it on my Mom's horse which needed a little more shoulder relief and had the same problem: it made it worse.
My saddles fit him properly so I know it is not saddle fit. I ended up riding him strictly western with a mohair roper cinch and a rear cinch and rarely does the saddle slide anymore, only when I trail ride very steep hills or lope down hills. The other thing I changed was he now has a 100% wool felt pad, no fleece or fabric/canvas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A crupper would be the last-ditch thing I'd try. I'm actually desensitizing him to it right now, for driving purposes, so at least he should eventually be OK with it (he isn't yet LOL).

And it's not really THAT bad, and it doesn't happen that often any more. It's just that the place where I bought his harness is suggesting a similar style girth to keep his driving saddle in place correctly, and I thought if it helps with that, maybe it would help with his riding saddle.
 
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