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I think it will heal completely. If it scars it does, but I don’t think it will. We’ve had a lot of ear injuries in our main corral. Zeus is just too rough. Queens was as bad as hers at one point, and you would never know looking at her today. I have a fear that Zeus will eventually bite an ear off completely.
It's amazing how well skin injuries heal in horses.

Maybe Zeus would like to spend some time wearing a grazing muzzle? He could still eat, but not bite...
 

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We would call a horse like Bandit (if it is true that he gets injured all the time) a "hard luck horse." I have known folks who had hard luck horses, but I felt fortunate that I had never gotten one.

I bought Chorro from a photograph and had him delivered to me on a day when I was babysitting my friend's 3 kids. I had 2 young kids of my own, so a busy day. When baby Chorro came off the trailer, I almost wet myself, he was so beautiful. I never imagined owning such a lovely animal. He was everything I had ever longed for in a horse. And he would be mine forever! A whole lifetime of fun and dreams to share! All my life I had made do with other people's cast-off horses, mistakes, problem ponies. I had never gotten a beautiful friendly kind fun horse straight from a breeder. I was ecstatic!

For some reason which I now can't remember, the mom did not come back to pick up her kids until about 10:00 p.m. I wasn't able to spend much time with my new colt. We had fixed up the roomy foaling stall, which we had used for many years to fatten a steer. The stall had been pretty much in constant use. I had bedded it deep in shavings. Nothing but the best for my new colt!

Finally, my friend came to pick up her 3 kids, we got our 2 in bed, and I went out around 11:00 p.m. to check on my new treasure, my dream horse. He came up to the front of the stall walking funny. What was wrong? In the dim light of the barn, I saw with horror that he had stepped on a fat long screw, which had gone into his heel bulb and out his pastern.

I called the emergency vet and he said, "Pull out the screw, put a diaper on it with duct tape and call me in the morning." I said, "You don't understand! This is a barely handled yearling colt! He's halter broken and that's about it." The vet grudgingly came out, and I noticed the first thing he did was tranquilize my colt. Pull out the screw and slap a diaper on it, MY FOOT! THAT wasn't gonna happen. Before he left, the vet said there was a good chance that Chorro would be only pasture sound.

The vet drove away about 12:30. I knew my friend (a horse owner and horse lover) would still be awake. I called her in tears, sobbing that I had gotten myself a hard luck horse. I hadn't owned him 6 hours before I had a huge vet bill. And possibly never be rideable. My friend is somewhat psychic. She tends to know things.

She said, "He is not a hard luck horse. You will raise him and train him and ride him all his life. You will have wonderful adventures and great times with him. I know this." I believed her. And she was right.

Chorro does tend to get hurt a bit more than my other horses, but I've had the vet out for injuries to him fewer than 5 times and he is now 18 years old. Lucky me, he is not a hard luck horse. And Oakley won't be either.

Horse Working animal Liver Sorrel Fence


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I think we took this picture on Chorro's 2nd birthday.
 

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Bandit is bitten a lot because...well, he may share my personality. I got in a lot of fights as a kid in part because we moved every year and in part because I never knew when to shut up. 😕 He makes a lot of fuss at the other horses but doesn't seem to ever make contact - a degree of politeness they don't show him. But yes, if there is a splinter to find, a nail to be poked by, etc., then Bandit will find it. Fortunately The Wife was a nurse and did a lot of wound care for the elderly near the end of her time as a nurse. She'd look at Oakley's ear and mutter, "I'll go get my things..." Judging from her results with Bandit, that would work.

And Bandit, bless his soul, is a great horse to treat. He once got a splinter inside his hoof. I ended up using Q-tips soaked in alcohol, sticking them deep inside the hole and probing around, getting small pieces of wood out each time. Did that 3-4 times a day for nearly a week before the wood and pus went away. And Bandit? "Oooh! Owww! That hurts! But if you say it is necessary...." He'd stand there patiently, sometimes shaking a little but untied, because in his heart he believes humans do good things to/for horses. Trooper would probably try to kill me if I did the same thing. At a minimum, he'd think I was trying to kill him! But Bandit? "My person says I need this. Are we done yet?"
 

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That would have been horrible @knightrider! I’m glad your friend was right and that he’s been so good for you. I also don’t feel Oakley will be a hard luck kind of horse @bsms. I have had one, and it is rough. I think Bones is pretty well on that side too.

@SueC that would be a great idea!

I went and watched husband with Oakley today, and visited with her. I haven’t been around her much at all lately. He has done an excellent job! She loves people, and she leads lightly and pivots off both her front and hind end easily and athletically. She flexes lightly too. She is very smart and loves being worked with.

I finally rode Queen again! She was right where she left off. She was a little hot to start out with, but she settled down mostly.
 

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Queen

The fancy mare was ready to go, calling to the woman when she saw the house door open. At the trailer, after being saddled, something spooked the young mare, and she reared up pulling back. The woman was caught backwards, between the spooking mare and the giant of a horse tied beside her. She decided to simply stand there, for nothing she could do in her position would stop a wreck if it were to happen.

Surprisingly the big horse stood quietly beside her, and the mare stopped in a spot that did not wrap the woman into the soft homemade lead rope. She talked to the filly, trying to convince her back into her spot, but the mare was determined that something bad was happening there, so she left her where she stood tight on the rope with her nostrils flared.

She went into the house for a quick snack, and came back outside to find the mare in her correct position. She tightened her cinch, bridled her up, stepped her off and swung into the saddle. The mare was hot after too little of riding over the past couple weeks, but she felt attentive enough to the woman. They did their warm ups beside the trailer, in the open gravel under the trees.

The woman had just begun working with the mare on vertical flexion, and she hadn’t seemed to pick up what the woman was asking for. She didn’t push the mare on the idea, for she knew it would click eventually, and she had only had two rides of learning the concept.

They walked towards the worked up area, and the mare suddenly sucked back. She had no idea what spooked the filly, but whatever it was was not easing in the young horse’s mind. It clicked to her then, that she should take advantage of the fear. Teaching rollbacks was simplest when a horse was afraid of something. It killed two birds with one stone.

Working on rollbacks was somewhat difficult, and the correct movement was that of a spooking horse. It was correct when it was gathered and sucked back. It seemed difficult to teach a horse concurrently with spinning, for the spin was a forward motion, and a rollback was an almost backward motion. Since rollbacks were difficult, a spooking horse would eventually decide that it was too much work, and they had enough time without force to accept what was frightening on their own.

The woman had prior avoided asking the mare for athleticism. The mare was naturally an athlete through and through. Since she was not a naturally gentler type of animal, the woman had asked her to do everything calmly and slowly. She knew that the mare’s talent would eventually shine through, but she wanted her to be solid in her understanding of things before she asked for that sparkle.

The mare was at a point now that the woman felt confident in her understanding of basic maneuvers, and she knew allowing her to spook would not blow her mind. Quickly the mare understood what she was asking, and her rollbacks were fancy even without the fear driving them, although it did not dissipate quickly.

When she finally asked the mare to cross the spot that frightened her she did so only with a little tightness left in her muscles. The woman finally realized what was bothering the fancy animal. The drier was broken, and the woman had hung several loads of wash all around the lawn furniture and steps. The colors waving in the wind were a sight.

They continued their ride, and suddenly the filly understood vertical flexion. It just clicked in her mind, and she was soft and flashy. She tended to over flex, but the woman was not worried about such things yet, and the feeling of asking the mare to show a little of her ability had the woman floating on air. She smiled wide, rubbing the heavy neck. The mare was going to be something special, and she hoped she had spent enough time keeping her slow and calm that they were ready to start playing with what she was capable of.
Sky Cloud Horse Vertebrate Working animal
Horse Plant Tree Bit Sky
 

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It’s a great start @gottatrot! I always wait a long time to work on it. I don’t know why. I usually get it in a backup, and in my side passes, but I don’t work on it for its own sake until later. I think I like having that ability to pull them around a little until I’m really confident in my cues.
 

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Cashman and Queen

The woman was saddling both horses for herself when her oldest came home from work. The big horse had been neglected while she focused on the filly, and she knew he needed ridden as well.

It was a hot morning, and she had just finished cinching up the beast of a horse when the girl walked over. She was in a bad mood, and not feeling well. They talked for a bit, and then the woman told her to climb on the beast and ride him. Activity always seemed to help with a negative mindset. The girl planned on using the horse for team roping, so her riding him was not a stretch.

The woman climbed into the saddle of the little filly, and they headed to the worked up patch. She explained to the girl that she should practice her warm up exercises on the big horse. He was actually better at them than her little sorrel, and it would do her some good to get the feeling of what it should be when she went back to the little sorrel.

When she struggled, it was easy on the big horse to explain what she needed to change and how to ask for the correct movements. The filly next to him did the same exercises. The prior day the girl had gotten a lesson on the little sorrel from her grandfather, and they had shown massive improvement with the new exercises.

Once the warm ups were through, the woman told the girl to run through the exercises her papa had shown her on the big horse. She introduced the filly to the program she had long used, and the little mare was insulted by the difficulty of it all. It was a reaction she knew to expect from the fancy animal, and why she had put off the exercise until she was prepared.

They worked on that for a time, and the horses were ready for a walk down the pivot road when they finished. The woman spent the time on the road explaining to the girl much of the mentality of training a horse. She explained to her that even when one had a bad attitude, they needed to react to the horse with logic and patience over emotion. She explained that Cash was a younger horse than Bones, and he could still be messed up with bad handling and hands.

In the end, the girl treated the horse with more tolerance and kindness. He wasn’t her little sorrel, who definitely had his own issues, but he deserved the respect of what he was, and for her to see the value of such a strong and steady animal. Cash was more correct in his cues than the little sorrel, but she began to understand the work that went into that, and how she needed to ride him as a trainer, and not with the same mentality that she rode the little horse.

It was a beneficial ride for all of them. The girl’s attitude melted by the end of it, and the big horse was happy to be used.
Sky Horse Mountain Ecoregion Natural environment
Horse Cloud Sky Plant Working animal
 

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It is special @TrainedByMares! I mean, yes she works for him and gets a lot of that type of discipline, but the two of them were so particularly excited about the team roping, and her getting hurt put a total end to that type of thing.

My father is a very talented man with a horse. People always came to learn from him. Now, it seems at the time he would be best suited to teach, he wasn’t getting that opportunity with the girls. Our horses weren’t his caliber, and I have been doing my own thing with them.

Bones however is as talented as any. He is broke too, and she knows how to ride him, and so he fit the bill perfectly for them to have a lesson.

Seeing her ask him for help, and watching him climb on the fence and work with her, and how happy they both were, just make me glow. She has never been able to stop the horse. Oh they stop, but I mean with that fancy slide that Bones has. Their stops have been mediocre. I worked and worked with her. If I pulled the bridle off of him and made her do it without any hands it would be better, but she couldn’t for whatever reason translate that to riding with the bridle on.

My father taught her an exercise that I have always used, but never thought to bring out with either of the girls. He scolded her for over riding, and it just clicked. They had the most beautiful stop she has ever had on him. Bones tried so hard in that stop that he almost fell down. Lol. She was smiling from ear to ear, and telling my father how grateful she was for his help.

He helped her with her cutting too, and taught her an exercise I have never seen and was amazed by. It is definitely one I will pull out if I need to correct a diving over aggressive horse.

It was fun that it was such a successful thing. It is what I think they dreamed the team roping would be, and I so look forward to watching him work with her over the summer.
 

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That is something she will never forget. I'm sure it does make you glow. It would me too. I'm excited to read about it in your journal!

My grandfather had a small fruit and vegetable farm and I spent time working with him and my dad when I was a kid. I don't remember a single bad day! Passing on the knowledge to the next generation is so cool and I'm glad to see it's still alive.
 

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Teeter!

I don’t know who remembers Teeter. She was the leppied buffalo that Mama ended up taking on. I was happy to be rid of her come weaning time and so was Mama! I got a picture sent to me this morning of her. So, here is a Teeter update for everyone!

Vertebrate Bison Working animal Mammal Grass
 
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