What is the command to make a horse get down? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 03:34 AM Thread Starter
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Question What is the command to make a horse get down?

Often camels get down from a full-standing position to make it easier to mount the animal or load heavy gear.

What is this position called?

Can horses, burros and mules be trained to do the same?

It might be much easier to load a 200-pound muley buck onto the back of a horse if the pack animal is gotten as low to the ground as possible.

Unless you are an Olympic bodybuilder, you can't just sling that big deer carcass over the back of your pack animal while at a full standing position. If the horse could be made to get down low, I would think one could simply drag the carcass over the horse's back then secure the load properly. It reminds me of cowboy films where the bounty hunter throws the dead bodies of wanted outlaws over the backs of horse in his string then parades them into town.
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post #2 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 04:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jonbailey View Post
It might be much easier to load a 200-pound muley buck onto the back of a horse if the pack animal is gotten as low to the ground as possible.
It's also a lot easier to give the horse joint arthritis, muscle sprains and general soft tissue injuries if you ask it to do something like that. Horses aren't designed to weightlift loads off the ground, even if you can "make" them do it.

Just like in human beings, putting the skeleton under strain with the joints bent to that extent is asking for busted cartilage and arthritis. Unlike camels, horses are also prone to quick movements if they take a fright, and this could lead to serious injury under load in that position.


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Unless you are an Olympic bodybuilder, you can't just sling that big deer carcass over the back of your pack animal while at a full standing position.
But you expect the horse to be an Olympic bodybuilder on your behalf???

You might be better off with a 4-wheeler.


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If the horse could be made to get down low, I would think one could simply drag the carcass over the horse's back then secure the load properly. It reminds me of cowboy films where the bounty hunter throws the dead bodies of wanted outlaws over the backs of horse in his string then parades them into town.
Yes, let's all take our cues on the humane treatment of horses from what we see on cowboy films. That wording of yours I've highlighted above, and the idea that you can "command" a horse, deserves a reminder that horses are sentient beings and don't owe you anything - and that if we're going to work with horses, we owe them respect.

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post #3 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 05:08 AM
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Camels, unlike horses, use their hind legs first when getting up and laying down. Horses use their front legs first and then the hinds. I guess that's why my horses ignore me when I point at them and say "sit!'.
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post #4 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 06:52 AM
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Yes, we should all watch movies to learn how best to interact with horses óó- not.

Making it easier on yourself to sling a carcass up on the horse is making things very hard on the horse.

Build a travois to carry whatever you killed. Itís a lot easier for the horse to pull it.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #5 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 07:03 AM
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This is the sort of thing @walkinthewalk is referring to. And this is a Spaghetti Western, so it's all tongue-in-cheek.


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post #6 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by HombresArablegacy View Post
Camels, unlike horses, use their hind legs first when getting up and laying down. Horses use their front legs first and then the hinds. I guess that's why my horses ignore me when I point at them and say "sit!'.
https://youtu.be/7x-FJDRiS2Y

I guess it's called the LAYDOWN position. The trick is to have the animal be still as the deer (perhaps a doe up to 125 pounds) is loaded over her pack saddle.


Last edited by jonbailey; 12-30-2019 at 07:41 AM.
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post #7 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 08:43 AM
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We are all familiar with what you allude to.

If you start lifting weights, it will not only get you in great condition for hunting (itís not a sport for the inactive person:), it will give you the strength to just throw that carcass right up on the horse

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.

I CAN'T ride 'em n slide 'em. I HAVE to lead 'em n feed 'em Thnx cowchick77.
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post #8 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 08:48 AM
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Teaching your horse to lay down as a trick is completely different from teaching it to lay down so you can heave a 200 lb dead animal over them. Just think about that for a minute... horses are a prey animal. You want to heave a bloody carcass on them as they are in a prone (and therefore completely vulnerable) position. To the rest of us horse people, it sounds like you want to treat a horse like a machine, not the amazingly sensitive and intuitive animal they are.

Of course horses can be trained to carry dead animals around, but not lift them off the ground. When horses pack around carcasses, they are cut into smaller pieces so they can be lifted and placed onto their backs in special packs so you only have to lift maybe 50 lbs at a time and the load can be evenly distributed.

I'd suggest watching less Westerns and signing up for some riding lessons so you can learn a little about how horses actually behave in real life. Or find a rescue, volunteer to work with horses in exchange for lessons... fantasizing about doing something is fun, but if you really want to do this, start taking more realistic steps to make it happen.
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post #9 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbailey View Post
I guess it's called the LAYDOWN position. The trick is to have the animal be still as the deer (perhaps a doe up to 125 pounds) is loaded over her pack saddle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hho4lQBMQb0
Yes, we all know how trick training works, but it's not meant to be abused to make horses lift heavy loads off the ground for you - for reasons previously explained by several people, but apparently in vain.

It's not whether something could be done, but whether it should be done. It's about having ethics.

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post #10 of 55 Old 12-30-2019, 09:10 AM Thread Starter
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I figured if man were as strong as a horse and as enduring physically as a horse he would have no practical use for them. I think of a horse as a possible TOOL but also as a possible hunting buddy. A beast of burden. Some armies for a few thousand years have regarded them as WEAPONS of WAR even.

Last edited by jonbailey; 12-30-2019 at 09:17 AM.
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