*picture* Am I pulling my bit too much? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 12-17-2018, 05:42 PM
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I'm going to post this since it was definitely a one rein stop. When I finally on reined him, I had my hand about six inches from the bit and it pulling laterally. A one rein is a way of disengaging the haunch until the horse in mechanically forced to brake. I don't like the hand up by the body for a one rein. You lose your power (you're now pulling up against the horse and your arms are not in a position of strength) whereas if you are "bending" the horse- albeit tightly, you reduce the risk of "running out of rein" and in another aspect of feeling trapped and going up in a rear or you unbalancing both of you. A one rein as youre doing it is punishing the top of the horses mouth and the lips (which when you're trying to avert disaster is definitely better than smashing into a fence) I find that out to the side works better for high strung horses, and I'd encourage you to develop a habit even on broke quiet horses that will help you later on with somewhat spirited mounts.

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post #22 of 29 Old 12-18-2018, 07:03 AM
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First of all, when turning using the rein, make sure the other rein isn't lose like yours is. Keep contact on both reins and add outside leg to "push" the horse around to turn. If you only pull on one rein the horse overbends and shoots his outside (in this case the right shoulder) out and makes him harder to turn. In every turn make sure the horse's outside shoulder stays in place using your outside leg and outside rein, the inside rein is only supposed to lead the horse in the right direction :)
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post #23 of 29 Old 12-18-2018, 10:49 AM
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@lostastirrup - your video is a perfect example of where I see terms like 1 rein stop, which seems to be more of a US/western riding 'thing', being used to describe something that riders in the UK have been doing in suitable situations 'forever' without calling it a name.
Essentially you're just spiraling the horse in ever decreasing circles until it's forced to slow down - though I have seen ponies fall over rather than oblige.
It works when it works but not something you should ever attempt unless you're in safe open space with enough room to circle the horse

Just winging it is not a plan
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post #24 of 29 Old 12-18-2018, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
@lostastirrup - your video is a perfect example of where I see terms like 1 rein stop, which seems to be more of a US/western riding 'thing', being used to describe something that riders in the UK have been doing in suitable situations 'forever' without calling it a name.
Essentially you're just spiraling the horse in ever decreasing circles until it's forced to slow down - though I have seen ponies fall over rather than oblige.
It works when it works but not something you should ever attempt unless you're in safe open space with enough room to circle the horse

And I guess for me, I would not call that a one-rein-stop what Losta did in their video. To me, that's just a spiral to control the horses speed (although, certainly a very valid and smart thing to do!) When I think of a ORS, I think of a horse that has spooked into a bolt, and you make a very serious sharp turn to stop the horse. IMO

So toe-may-toe or toe-MAH-toe! It still got the job done, no matter what you wanna call it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lostastirrup View Post
I'm going to post this since it was definitely a one rein stop.
For discussion purposes for the OP: I do not mean to pick on you at all by saying this, but I just wanted to comment on your body position throughout the video. At no point during the video do I see you asking the horse to stop with your seat. So, essentially, you ARE cueing the horse to continue going. That might have been why you had a hard time stopping him. Next time, think "sit" with your mind and then actually "sit" with your body to cue him to slow down.

As an example, see how far you are leaning forward in this snap shot? Again, that's just telling your horse to "go".




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post #25 of 29 Old 12-18-2018, 02:57 PM
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@beau159 I can see what you're saying with riding him rather forward. However I know full well he will happily gallop 3+ miles at a good clip with me essentially in a "brake" seat. He's of the unfortunate type that brakes from the seat had to be installed and they don't exist unless we're schooling and I've done all the homework for that nice stop. I don't like to compromise my balance on a speedy horse that is leaning dramatically while tearing around on a slick arena. A couple times I sat back on him, to no results. I'm not sure how I feel about the one rein stop that is immediate nose to knee on a running horse. Mostly because I've tried it with useless results- I get a horse that is bolting still, but now he doesn't know where he is going. They can do quite a lot with their nose by your knee. Lol. In the interest of safety I kinda have this list: 1. Stay on the horse. 2. Keep you and the horse from getting hurt. 3. Work towards a safer situation (ie stop) to me, a jarring stop or sharp turn is more likely to put us in danger and less likely to get a stop (heck he may rear and go over cause he feels trapped) than a incremental decrease in circle radius.
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post #26 of 29 Old 12-18-2018, 03:07 PM
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In addition to my post above. I just noticed the bit, so out of habit I gave you the way of english riding. Dunno what they teach you in western classes. My bad ;)
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post #27 of 29 Old 12-19-2018, 11:11 PM
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YES!!!!! I try not to use bits at all. I only use them at shows and practicing in actual bridles. Most of the time I just practice in Hackamores.
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post #28 of 29 Old 12-20-2018, 12:27 PM
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80% of “teaching” a ORS to RIDERS is so the body weight goes BACK when the hand is pulled to the hip, and they quit “riding”. The innate default panic position is DOWN, but that does not keep the body balanced on the horse, as UP does!
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post #29 of 29 Old 12-22-2018, 04:20 PM
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Quote by beau159 "Does Weiser know how to do a one-rein-stop? Based on this picture, I wonder. He looks to be very resistant to the bit and fighting you. That is not what a beginner rider should be riding, IMO. You will not learn how to be light with your hands if you end up pulling (it looks like you were very much pulling in the picture)."
My question also. I assume this is a lesson horse and not your horse. Personally, I would not think a beginning rider should be teaching the horse this move. You will learn as you go along some horses are very flexible and others are like trying to bend an oak branch. My Arab/Saddlebred bends like a willow, the Paint, well, the oak. I like to work on flexing from the ground (good video except I don't use a tail hair as a connection), and always use pressure and immediately release when the horse responds. For me this makes it easier when you ask for a response when you are in the saddle. Just something to keep in the old "data bank" for future use. : )
Good luck and happy riding!
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