difference between trot & jog? how about canter & lope? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woodhaven View Post
I looked up an AQHA west pl class one time and at the lope my husband came over and looked at the screen. he said "all those horses are lame, what's going on?"
He is not a horse person and that was just his observation.
Well, as a long time horse person who just had no clue as to WP, as in for showing, a few years ago I did/thought exactly the same as your husband... posted here with questions(& admittedly some assumptions) and got blasted. It just looks so awful & uncomfortable for the horse...
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post #12 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 03:57 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Spanish Rider View Post
I had the opportunity to ride an Appendix a few years ago. To my English-trained self, the 'jog' was slower, yet also had a decidedly lateral movement in the hinds, and I was told that this is typical of a quarterhorse jog. So, I believe that breeding also comes into play in defining the difference. In asking your child to feel the difference, perhaps it was speed as well as laterality.
I don't understand what you mean by 'lateral movement of the hind'? Do you mean hips swing more or something? I'm familiar with riding pacers, where they sort of 'side to side' rather than 'up & down' of a trot...
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post #13 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 04:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Jolien View Post
why do you think I ride western? Lol. Those horses are a dream to ride. The cantering can indeed be really fast and extreme on reining horses, but they are taught to speed up along certain lines in the riding area so... :p I definately learned to stick to the saddle on those horses, haha.
Jolein, I now understand this difference in *terminology*(thanks everyone), but I'd say to the above, you haven't ridden a well trained 'English'(or just other than 'Western') horse then, if you feel that is why you ride Western - differences in speed within a gait aren't just a Western thing - for eg. I could comfortably do a slow trot bareback on my old boy for hours, or I can ask for a fast trot, which is uncomfortable for too long if I don't rise to it.
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post #14 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
I don't understand what you mean by 'lateral movement of the hind'? Do you mean hips swing more or something? I'm familiar with riding pacers, where they sort of 'side to side' rather than 'up & down' of a trot...
'Lateral'/lateral movement is just a term for side to side movement or 'to' the side.

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post #15 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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^Hmm, haven't thought about that with a slow trot - will have to pay attention as to whether their hips swing more.
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post #16 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 05:23 PM
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Ok guys, then what is the beat of a jog. It used to be a two beat gait that looked amazingly like a trot. When did jog change from just another word to a complete different gait?
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post #17 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 05:24 PM Thread Starter
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^I got the idea from what others said here that it is indeed a trot by another name, only the speed is the difference.
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post #18 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 05:36 PM
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I'd like to add that a jog and a lope aren't exclusively Western things. Thunder has both a jog and a trot, and a lope and a canter. With his jog, as in every jog, there is minimal knee and hock engagement and the overall motion is flat and smooth. He has a horrendous draft horse trot, very up and down with higher knee and hock action and it will darn near knock the fillings out of your teeth. The difference between his lope and his canter is less marked but it's still there - again, minimal knee and hock action and much smoother ride overall.

I've yet to find Dreams' canter, though he also has a definitive trot and jog. When pressed Dreams' lope will get faster, his strides longer, but it never really changes in smoothness nor in engagement of his hocks and knees. It's just as easy to sit loping slow circles in the arena as it is moving right out on the trail. Just faster motion, is all.

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post #19 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriF View Post
Ok guys, then what is the beat of a jog. It used to be a two beat gait that looked amazingly like a trot. When did jog change from just another word to a complete different gait?
Jog=2 beat gait,,,ie a slower , softer trot
Lope=3 beat gait, ie a slower, softer canter

I don't think anyone has said they are 'complete different gait',,,that was asked in the original post , and clarified by responses to be same gait, just slower versions that got their own names.

Clear as mud? ..lol...
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post #20 of 37 Old 02-26-2020, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
I don't understand what you mean by 'lateral movement of the hind'? Do you mean hips swing more or something? I'm familiar with riding pacers, where they sort of 'side to side' rather than 'up & down' of a trot...
Maybe what they mean is this here starting at 8:16. What I see is a very unbalanced horse with his hip being pushed to the inside to give the illusion of deeper hock action. This looks very labored to me, either that or lame which I doubt. To me, that is more a gimmick than a gait.


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