"Lopes on a loose rein" - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 44 Old 06-17-2020, 10:44 PM
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@jgnmoose thanks for posting that video, it was really interesting. Really good-looking horse, too. I have two questions about it, though.

1. What were those noises throughout? Was it people? Why would they make that sound?
2. What is the point of having a rider? I mean, really. That horse, it seems like he knows what he's doing and doesn't need anyone telling him how to do it.
Here's a video of a horse with a lot of cow sense, doing cutting without a rider, and caring himself in a natural manner.

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Last edited by boots; 06-18-2020 at 08:47 AM.
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post #32 of 44 Old 06-17-2020, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
@jgnmoose thanks for posting that video, it was really interesting. Really good-looking horse, too. I have two questions about it, though.

1. What were those noises throughout? Was it people? Why would they make that sound?
2. What is the point of having a rider? I mean, really. That horse, it seems like he knows what he's doing and doesn't need anyone telling him how to do it.
Haha good question about those noises. I don't know why they do that. Probably a combination of something to do and it being too quiet without them. Personally I have never yipped or yeeeed. The Reined Cow Horse people go over the top with it.


In Reining the horse isn't supposed to do anything they aren't told to. If you are supposed to go slow and the horse goes fast, that is a zero score for going off pattern. That it looks like they are doing the pattern without any trouble is what you want it to look like but is not what is happening.

The hardest parts to do well are the run downs and the circles. Circles because they have to be actual circles and most horses will lean in or push out a little throughout the entire thing. Run downs because the horses start to know what is coming and get excited. The run down is supposed to be a gradual build up to speed and then a stop. Teaching a horse to keep going fast and wait for the stop cue is usually pretty difficult.

Spins and rollbacks look cool but are not terribly difficult for most horses to learn. Lead changes too, although I've come across a few that needed a lot of work to get it and one that kicked out so bad he'll never be competitive probably. Ideally it is so smooth that it isn't really noticeable anything happened, other than being in a different lead of course.

Reining is basically a sport about making technically challenging things look pretty easy and boring lol.
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post #33 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 01:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
@jgnmoose thanks for posting that video, it was really interesting. Really good-looking horse, too. I have two questions about it, though.

1. What were those noises throughout? Was it people? Why would they make that sound?



Holy cow..........they sound just like cow elk! They could get side jobs during hunting season!

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post #34 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 03:18 AM
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@jgnmoose I presume that in real life the rider tells the horse which cow to isolate and where to take it. I am presuming this is done to take cows away from the herd for a practical reason like vet care, not for the fun of it.
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post #35 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 03:22 AM
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Are they told which cow to go after in these competitions or do they just choose a random one?
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post #36 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 03:35 AM
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^If it's like Aussie 'camp drafting', the rider is told which to cut, or there are a few marked to choose from.

And yeah, Trailhorse, holy cow - never knew elk made that noise. The comp noises sounded to me like the weird noises many elite tennis players seem to feel the need for, whenever they make a shot!
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post #37 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 07:42 AM Thread Starter
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@jgnmoose I presume that in real life the rider tells the horse which cow to isolate and where to take it. I am presuming this is done to take cows away from the herd for a practical reason like vet care, not for the fun of it.
I will see what @jgnmoose says, but I think this originated in having to brand the cattle, and that's why they are often (or always?) working calves. So, once a year you'd bring all your new cattle into the corral, then you'd have to get them separated one by one so you could brand them (and, yes, presumably give them any vet work they needed).

What I wonder is, these horses that do this work in an arena, do any of them actually do real work on ranches as well, or is the skill only for show purposes?
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post #38 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 09:09 AM
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It certainly started as a competition between working horses/cowboys, like other rodeo type events, but I'm sure there are many that only do the competition these days.
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post #39 of 44 Old 06-18-2020, 09:12 AM
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When I have more time I'll come back...so quickly:

Loose rein...
Loping or doing anything on a loose reins from teaching a horse accountability for working cattle You don't want a mechanical robot. You guide the instinct not baby sit it.


In cutting, you get choose your cattle to work That's a good portion of the battle. You need to be able to read and pick cattle during your run that will best showcase your horse. Also knowing when to quit your cow and go back to the herd and cut a new one.

Whistling, hooping and hollering during a run...
It is to show excitement but it also has meanings. A lot of trainers have their own whistles, wrong lead, speed up, slow down, etc. Coaching from the stands sort of speak.
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post #40 of 44 Old 06-19-2020, 03:23 PM
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@jgnmoose I presume that in real life the rider tells the horse which cow to isolate and where to take it. I am presuming this is done to take cows away from the herd for a practical reason like vet care, not for the fun of it.

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Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
I will see what @jgnmoose says, but I think this originated in having to brand the cattle, and that's why they are often (or always?) working calves. So, once a year you'd bring all your new cattle into the corral, then you'd have to get them separated one by one so you could brand them (and, yes, presumably give them any vet work they needed).

What I wonder is, these horses that do this work in an arena, do any of them actually do real work on ranches as well, or is the skill only for show purposes?
Correct, it originated in sorting cattle for any reason you would need to pick specific cattle out of a herd and do something with them like load them on a truck for example. In the branding pen calves are usually roped because if you have good ropers it is much faster.

Cutting as in the sport is basically just that meaning if they are a Cutting horse they pretty much do it in an arena. Like Reining and Reined Cow Horse the big money is in the 3 and 4 year olds. At the end of the day, what drives these sports is winning the futurity. Winning it basically turns that horse into a profitable breeding business for the owners, especially true of stallions. For example the horse I linked is named Metallic Cat and his stud fee is $15,000.

Unfortunately that also makes these sports prohibitively expensive for average people at the competitive level.

There is a market for "cutters who don't make the cut", and some of hoses do get used in ranching. They are naturally gifted at working cattle and popular with people who need a young working horse that is already trained. I would still rather have a seasoned horse off one of the better ranches like the Wagoner personally though, but that is off topic.

As for what they are doing, the rider's most important job is to know cattle well enough to pick out a cow that is going to be a good match for the horse. There are also rules about having to go into the herd to cut them, you can't just pick ones off the outside. You don't want a boring dud, or one that is going to do crazy stuff, neither will give much of a score. There is basically no score for the person, it is all how well the horse works and the horse should work the cow as much as possible by themselves once the cow has been cut out of the herd.

They change out the cattle after so many runs to give competitors a fair chance. Each time they do someone rides through and around them to settle them down and get them used to a horse being near them. Cattle get dull or sour to being worked fairly quickly so they have to do this and it's another reason Cutting is expensive.

It would be a much different sport if the cattle were picked for you and the rider's job was to take them some place. In that regard events like Team Penning and Camp Drafting are more realistic to ranch work in my opinion.
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