"Lopes on a loose rein" - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 44 Old 06-19-2020, 06:15 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Montana
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When I rode for Bill Hunter in high school, he told me there are two types of cattle - movers and shakers. The movers will try to sneak by you on the outsides, so will get a bit of running in as they try to circle you. The shakers are the ones that hunker down and do 3, 4, 5 quick rollbacks in a row as they try to bamboozle your horse into falling behind. Ideally, you want at least one of each during your run, to showcase your horse's ability to handle either type. A good cutting horse is "a mover and a shaker" meaning he can keep up with whatever the cow throws at him.

I'm adamantly against cutting horse futurities where 2 year olds are expected to cut that is too much for young bodies in my opinion. But I really really love the sport of cutting as a whole, the idea of it, and riding a good cutting horse is definitely an experience everyone should have at least once. There is something supremely awesome in dropping that rein hand down on your horse's mane and telling him "Okay dude, it's all you now" and feeling him really MOVE to get after that cow, all on his own, because he wants to. I just love it when they get pinny eared and stare down that cow like they're gonna eat it alive if they get half a chance. Mm, baby. That's some sexy stuff, right there. In my opinion there isn't another sport in the horse world where the rider gives over complete control to the horse like that, where the horse becomes the 'brain' so to speak and the rider becomes, for all intents and purposes, an ornament.

-- Kai
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post #42 of 44 Old 06-19-2020, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Kaifyre View Post
When I rode for Bill Hunter in high school, he told me there are two types of cattle - movers and shakers. The movers will try to sneak by you on the outsides, so will get a bit of running in as they try to circle you. The shakers are the ones that hunker down and do 3, 4, 5 quick rollbacks in a row as they try to bamboozle your horse into falling behind. Ideally, you want at least one of each during your run, to showcase your horse's ability to handle either type. A good cutting horse is "a mover and a shaker" meaning he can keep up with whatever the cow throws at him.

I'm adamantly against cutting horse futurities where 2 year olds are expected to cut that is too much for young bodies in my opinion. But I really really love the sport of cutting as a whole, the idea of it, and riding a good cutting horse is definitely an experience everyone should have at least once. There is something supremely awesome in dropping that rein hand down on your horse's mane and telling him "Okay dude, it's all you now" and feeling him really MOVE to get after that cow, all on his own, because he wants to. I just love it when they get pinny eared and stare down that cow like they're gonna eat it alive if they get half a chance. Mm, baby. That's some sexy stuff, right there. In my opinion there isn't another sport in the horse world where the rider gives over complete control to the horse like that, where the horse becomes the 'brain' so to speak and the rider becomes, for all intents and purposes, an ornament.

-- Kai
You know, you helped me figure out whats different about them - they move like a predator.
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post #43 of 44 Old 06-19-2020, 06:31 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Montana
Posts: 983
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It is super aggressive isn't it? It's weird about cutting, too - if you teach a horse that he can control a cow, that he can put it exactly where he wants it, for some reason horses really like doing just that. I've seen cutting horses given time off cut a big ball, or the neighbor's dog, or small children if they can't cut cattle. Strangely, I've never seen a horse try to cut another horse lol just other things.

-- Kai
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post #44 of 44 Old 06-19-2020, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: CenTex
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Originally Posted by Kaifyre View Post
. I just love it when they get pinny eared and stare down that cow like they're gonna eat it alive if they get half a chance. Mm, baby. That's some sexy stuff, right there. In my opinion there isn't another sport in the horse world where the rider gives over complete control to the horse like that, where the horse becomes the 'brain' so to speak and the rider becomes, for all intents and purposes, an ornament.
-- Kai
I worry about their joints, but... yeah... I love to see a horse getting pinny eared at those cattle -- it makes it seem like they really love their job. I say this because my Pony used to live out with a herd of cattle, and he just loving bossing them around, even the bull, and especially when they tried to boss his friends. He'd get all pinny eared like that, snake his head, and run them off, then trot around like he was super proud of himself.

One of these days we will make it to that cattle penning class, and it may be that he discovers a new vocation after that LOL.
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"Saddle fit -- it's a no brainer!"" - random person
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