losing stirrups on pony & problems riding on a tiny pony - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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losing stirrups on pony & problems riding on a tiny pony

Lately I am somewhat frustrated. I learned to ride on the horse of a friend (and I keep on taking lessons.) I also ride in a horse school on a riding... pony... They matched me up with a pony because he is old and docile and experienced. He is basically a good pony. But the problem is that I am very tall and so my feet hang far below the belly of the horse. They gave me spurs to ride, but I still have to literally lift my leg and feet for giving aids so I either lose my stirrups or my feet slide too far in it (when applying heel pressure not to lose the stirrup.) I read that more experienced riders use their upper legs to apply pressure, but this is a school horse and he does not get the signal for galloping when I only apply pressure like that.



Also it seems to be impossible to sit the trot because he takes tiny steps.Because of that I bounce and hurt him and I don't want to be that kind of rider! So I try to go to a gallop directly from just stepping, but he also does not get that and first starts to trot (and then I am already bouncing and feeling guilty and then I want to quickly tell him to gallop and then everything goes wrong because I lose a stirrup, my feet get too far in the stirrup, I bounce and get frustrated... I know part of the problem is that the horse is a bit dead to certain aids, but I am just a client that rides once or twice a week and I can't retrain a pony that is ridden by so many people.



I will tell my trainer that I want to learn to do light riding while galloping and that I want to learn different (sensible) things that I can learn on the pony. I can by the way perfectly sit the trot without coming out of the saddle and perfectly gallop and stick to the saddle on a horse. I also have never had the problem of losing a stirrup while galloping on a horse. Of course I requested a horse, but they don't have one for a beginner. I already decided the pony and I are not a good galloping match, but I just wanted some advice from experienced riders. What can I do differently to make it a more pleasurable experience for both me and the pony? If it continues like it is now, I am gonna request that we refer from galopping. Let's be real, I would never purchase a pony... So I am not really motivated to learn to sit the trot on a tiny horsey. But I am very much motivated to be a rider that does not hurt the horse.
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post #2 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 02:35 PM
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How tall are you?
How tall is the pony?
Unless your knees hang past the equine's barrel, then you can cue with your calves. I have seen people 6+ ft. (183+ cm) on cute, tiny little ponies, and they both do just fine.

You are from Europe. For clarification, when you say "gallop" do you mean the three beat gait (10-17 mph (16–27 km/h); "canter"/"lope" in the U.S.) or the four beat gait (fastest gait)?

It sounds like you have been receiving some misinformation from the riding school and/or your trainer. Why are you wearing and using spurs? I have been riding over ten years and still feel like I do not have the leg control to use spurs. An inexperienced person should not be using spurs. If the horse is properly trained, the rider should not need to use spurs to cue a canter/gallop. Although spurs can be used as a "pay attention" cue, they are not meant to be used as a forward cue on a dead-sided equine.

When cueing for the canter/gallop from a trot, you should sit. Meanwhile, depending on your experience level, you can either post or two-point.

How do you catch a horse that does not want to be caught?
Make excited carrot noises.

Last edited by BHRST; 11-09-2019 at 02:44 PM. Reason: Clarification.
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post #3 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 03:21 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BHRST View Post
How tall are you?
How tall is the pony?
Unless your knees hang past the equine's barrel, then you can cue with your calves. I have seen people 6+ ft. (183+ cm) on cute, tiny little ponies, and they both do just fine.

You are from Europe. For clarification, when you say "gallop" do you mean the three beat gait (10-17 mph (16–27 km/h); "canter"/"lope" in the U.S.) or the four beat gait (fastest gait)?

It sounds like you have been receiving some misinformation from the riding school and/or your trainer. Why are you wearing and using spurs? I have been riding over ten years and still feel like I do not have the leg control to use spurs. An inexperienced person should not be using spurs. If the horse is properly trained, the rider should not need to use spurs to cue a canter/gallop. Although spurs can be used as a "pay attention" cue, they are not meant to be used as a forward cue on a dead-sided equine.

When cueing for the canter/gallop from a trot, you should sit. Meanwhile, depending on your experience level, you can either post or two-point.

Gallop: I mean the fastest a horse can go. We only have one word for that in our language it seems like English has two?



I can't use my calves because they are below the horse, my whole feet and a part of my lower leg hang below the belly of the pony. I am 1m82 cm. I don't know how tall the pony is, he is significantly tinier then a quarter horse (which I normally ride).



I also agree with you on the spurs. I told the instructor I don't want to wear and use spurs so they gave me kids spurs/some kind of training things. In my opinion the horse is willing to work, it is confused by inconsistent training so I don't think using spurs is legitimized. I am also gonna refuse to wear the spurs next time.
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post #4 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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When cueing for the canter/gallop from a trot, you should sit. Meanwhile, depending on your experience level, you can either post or two-point.[/QUOTE]


I know you should sit to cue from trot to gallop, but I can't sit the trot on this pony because his movements are so tiny and fast... (that's why I try to make him go from stepping to gallop at once so I can at least not annoy him in the trot) I do sit during the gallop, I never did the two point during gallop, I can perfectly do the two point during trot but the horse doesn't understand more leg pressure means 'transition to gallop', he thinks it means: more schwung/faster trot. :)

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post #5 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 04:06 PM
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If they be given you a too small pony because that's the most suitable they've got, if they give beginners spurs... is there anywhere else you can go for lessons?

Some info I've found helpful; [COLOR=Lime][B]www.horseforum.com/horse-health/hoof-lameness-info-horse-owners-89836/
For taking critique pics; [COLOR=Lime][B]https://www.horseforum.com/members/41...res-128437.jpg
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post #6 of 47 Old 11-09-2019, 04:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
If they be given you a too small pony because that's the most suitable they've got, if they give beginners spurs... is there anywhere else you can go for lessons?

Yeah, I was thinking about that too. I don't get that a horse riding school doesn't at least have some beginner horses. I am gonna try some different horse riding schools... But it is hard to find western riding schools where I live... I already looked into it and I am gonna book some lessons elsewhere (it is further away and really expensive)...

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post #7 of 47 Old 11-11-2019, 06:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolien View Post
Yeah, I was thinking about that too. I don't get that a horse riding school doesn't at least have some beginner horses. I am gonna try some different horse riding schools... But it is hard to find western riding schools where I live... I already looked into it and I am gonna book some lessons elsewhere (it is further away and really expensive)...
This school doesn’t sound ideal. Do you have any English schools nearby? From your other thread I gather you are a beginner. At that stage, English vs. Western doesn’t make much difference. Riding is riding. Go to the English school, get a lot of hours in. You can easily switch to Western later. It really isn’t very different until you get to higher levels of a specific discipline.
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post #8 of 47 Old 11-11-2019, 06:59 AM Thread Starter
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@Horsef Well erm... English is more popular so there are lots of English riding schools, but I have some issues (hard to explain) with my motoric movements. The problem is that automatisation of things take a lot of time and once something is ingrained it is really difficult to forget/overwrite it... I specifically chose western because I would not have to have contact with a bit and would be able to focus on my seat, neck reining and leg cues. I found that I can easily follow the movement of the horse with my body but have to think actively and hard about specific leg and rein cues. I am afraid that riding English will mess my learning proces up and I am almost certain riding with contact will be impossible for me. :( I cannot coordinate hand movement whilst remaining in contact + legs + seat.) Seat comes the most natural to me. I actively think about legs, feet in stirrups and the properly holding of the reins while neck reining.



If I would try to ride with contact it would probably take me 10X more time then an average rider. I would also cause the horse to suffer. Not okay. :( So I am gonna try to find a good western school... Even if I have to pay much and have to travel far.



Maybe I can switch to English when I can do all the rest very good (because then I would only have to focus on the rein contact??)
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post #9 of 47 Old 11-11-2019, 07:32 AM
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How about you just take the stirrups off? I don't know if that would work, given what you said about your issues with movement, but I think it could solve both of your problems.

1. No stirrups means no stirrups to lose.
2. I personally find it a lot easier to sit the trot without stirrups, and most people I've talked to have said the same.

Riding with no stirrups is generally considered to be really good for you.
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post #10 of 47 Old 11-11-2019, 08:02 AM
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We have two words in english for canter and gallop because they are two different gaits. I am guessing you perhaps are meaning the canter when you are talking about the gallop. In english we call the same gait canter as they call the lope in western.

You know what walk and trot are, and the canter is the third gait which is a three beat gait and is faster than a trot. The fourth gait is gallop, which is a four beat gait. When the horse transitions from canter to gallop, the three beat smoother motion becomes a rougher four beat motion.

The canter is not the fastest gait a horse has, but is usually the fastest gait that horses are ridden in an arena or during lessons. The gallop is the fastest gait a horse has, and is what racehorses are competed in. Sitting the canter is nice on most horses. Sitting the gallop is not nice on many horses, since it is rougher. Many riders get up in two point for galloping.
This horse is galloping.


This horse is cantering (loping in western).
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