Working Dude Ranch Vacation? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 19 Old 01-21-2019, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
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Cool, I might try that! My pony definitely pins his ears, and he has sort of nipped a couple that didn't move fast enough in the past. And yes it was effective, LOL. I doubt the cattle here have ever been worked from a horse, though -- the way they move them if they need to is to pour a bunch of these cattle pellets they have into a bucket, shake it loudly to get their attention, then hop into the tractor and drive at a slow walk until they get where they want them to go.

Hmm, one possible issue -- the herd has a bull with them as well. The bull is docile and nice to humans and neither he nor the cows have horns, but is it possible that he might try to "protect" the cows or calves if I try to move them?
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post #12 of 19 Old 01-21-2019, 06:26 PM
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Use extreme caution with a bull, even a friendly one. I wouldn't work in a field with a bull as your first experience with cattle. Go to a clinic or elsewhere, or wait until the bull is elsewhere!


As a rule of thumb, you don't want to teach people or horses how to work cattle with cattle that live in a field with horses. You want cattle that are a little fresher, softer, and respectful of the horse to build the horse's confidence and to show you how your movements affect the cattle. A dull, sulled-up heifer your horse sees every day is not going to give you the same experience as a steer that has lived out on the range and has seen someone on a horse only rarely. The only time I would work really seasoned cattle with a young horse would be if there was no other option, or if I had a trained dog. A trained dog to back up your directions can rapidly take a sulled-up steer to an easily-moved steer when he learns that if he doesn't move when you want, you send the dog.
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post #13 of 19 Old 01-21-2019, 06:34 PM Thread Starter
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@SilverMaple thank you!
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post #14 of 19 Old 01-21-2019, 06:38 PM
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Not exactly a "vacation" but quite an opportunity for the right person (plus you can bring your own horse if you want)

http://www.ranchworldads.com/classif...listing=101035
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post #15 of 19 Old 01-22-2019, 06:55 AM
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Self train. Watch experienced people and videos. How - tos. Look up where and how they actually train this.

Ain't no Foal to this.
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post #16 of 19 Old 01-22-2019, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
Cool, I might try that! My pony definitely pins his ears, and he has sort of nipped a couple that didn't move fast enough in the past. And yes it was effective, LOL. I doubt the cattle here have ever been worked from a horse, though -- the way they move them if they need to is to pour a bunch of these cattle pellets they have into a bucket, shake it loudly to get their attention, then hop into the tractor and drive at a slow walk until they get where they want them to go.

Hmm, one possible issue -- the herd has a bull with them as well. The bull is docile and nice to humans and neither he nor the cows have horns, but is it possible that he might try to "protect" the cows or calves if I try to move them?
If you decide to try working the cattle your horse is in with, if you do not own them, please ask the owners. It is extremely rude not to.

Bulls are not protective of cow/calf pairs, they just fight other bulls over cows. If cows are bulling then trying to part him off can be difficult. Also they are a little different to work than cows or yearlings. Depending on temperament and previous handling, pressure and release is important. Plus if he's friendly or gentle they seem to be the worst to handle because they don't have much of a bubble.

In the beginning instilling confidence in you and your horse is important. Start just tracking/trailing, show your horse is capable of moving them. This is all fine and good if you want to get a feel for it and gain some confidence with your horse but I really do urge you to go ride with someone who can teach you and your horse. You'll learn more, faster. There's a lot more to it than just sitting behind a bunch of cows and yelling at them.

Where in TX are you?

I DON'T LEAD 'EM AND FEED 'EM, I RIDE 'EM AND SLIDE 'EM.
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post #17 of 19 Old 01-22-2019, 08:14 PM
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There are a couple outfits in Wyoming that offer "working vacations." One is in Douglas, Wyoming. Owned by the Daly family. I don't recall names of others. But you will get a lot of saddle time and be coached in general cattle handling.

It may seem odd, but some of my friends who own great ranches go to dude ranches in AZ in the winter. And one group of ranch women always takes a week off in the winter and goes. They love getting to do all the fun without any of the responsibility.

Someone else cooks. And they have hot tubs!
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post #18 of 19 Old 01-24-2019, 08:15 PM
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@ACinATX you should join Stock Horse of Texas! Aka American Stock Horse Association. They have an awesome format....cattle, reining, western pleasure(for lack of a better term...itís not a rail class) They do a clinic one or two days, then a show. You can just do the clinic portion, and get the feel for it!

I don't break horses, I FIX them!
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post #19 of 19 Old 01-25-2019, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACinATX View Post
Cool, I might try that! My pony definitely pins his ears, and he has sort of nipped a couple that didn't move fast enough in the past. And yes it was effective, LOL. I doubt the cattle here have ever been worked from a horse, though -- the way they move them if they need to is to pour a bunch of these cattle pellets they have into a bucket, shake it loudly to get their attention, then hop into the tractor and drive at a slow walk until they get where they want them to go.

Hmm, one possible issue -- the herd has a bull with them as well. The bull is docile and nice to humans and neither he nor the cows have horns, but is it possible that he might try to "protect" the cows or calves if I try to move them?

IDK. Most herd bulls, unless they're actively romancing one of their ladies 'in season', are pretty chill. They know what is expected of them. The ranch owner would know whether or not their bull is a jackwagon to horses. Most ranch owners won't keep one around if he's mean enough to mug a horse working the herd. They don't have time for that nonsense and a bull like that, or his female counterpart (See below - Crazy Cow) will be promptly hauled to the livestock auction and sold for hamburder. They simply won't fool with the mean ones... unless they're a rodeo livestock contractor, then all bets are off.

My personal experience: All of ours wanted nothing to do with horses. Carlos, our Charolais/white limousine looked intimidating, but a pleasant HOLA CARLOS! COMO ESTA!? and he was head up, pleased to see us. Always avoided the horses because he knew it meant they were about to drag him, forcibly, out of the neighbor's lease pasture. But even then, the neighbor lease owner had his own bull and even though they fought and competed for the attention of their ladies, neither was ever aggressive toward us or the horses (Unless they were RUNNING TO GET AWAY FROM BEING CAUGHT... then they'd run over you, so it was always best to keep a truck between you and Carlos, or be in the bed of the truck, or in the cab, or on a horse.... chasing Carlos.

However, you can be guaranteed there will be at least one or two 'crazy' cows in every herd. THOSE are the ones that will take on a horse and rider or pin you against the feed truck and 'wool you up'. They're at their most foul when they have a calf to protect. I've never known our bulls to protect the calves - only the cows have done that... and woooo... that is some scary stuff when they get you wadded up against a vehicle and those few seconds seem like minutes.

Also... Uhm... Well. Okay.

Ranchers... aren't exactly polite when they're doing work. Hope you're prepared for all manner of rude and exotic vulgarities to be shouted, uttered, yelled, screamed, etc.... beer during... possibly cigars later... and um. Yeah. The real ranchers I know are pretty salty and more intimidating than their bulls. I love their company, but you better have a thick skin and not take things personal if you throw in with a real working ranch set up.

"We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us."

Last edited by AtokaGhosthorse; 01-25-2019 at 12:30 PM.
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